Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

stargazine_ep15_banner.thumb.jpg.34f8495864951c81ec35e285b4d7b2e0.jpg

Recommended Posts

Hi. Was up at dawn observing Mercury rising in the southeast and slowly swept my binoculars left. I was able to vaguely see a small triangle formed by Upsilon Ophiuchi, HR  6128 and HR 6137. That was the limit of view as sunlight was washing out anything else to the left of that. But I clicked on the adjacent HR6144 star in my Sky Guide app and it lists as being 6,900 light years away. When I checked the Ski Safari app, the same star is listed as 1,900 light years. I went online and found little info but, “In the Sky” web page it’s HR 6144 at 9 kilo years / 9,000 light years. Does anyone have any info as to why the huge discrepancies?

https://in-the-sky.org/data/object.php?id=TYC5627-1490-1

Thanks in advance for your help. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stellarium has it at about 4500 ly.

Apparently, its  spectral type is A9 II/III, somewhere in the giant to bright giant range. It may be difficult to pin down its precise absolute brightness, which of course has a bearing on its distance.

http://simbad.u-strasbg.fr/simbad/sim-id?Ident=HR++6144 call it a post asymptotic giant branch star and a proto planetary nebula.

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ruud, thanks very much for the concise explanation. All those numbers at Simbad make my head orbit. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From Gaia the parallax is 0.3612 mas

To find the distance in parsecs divide 1 by the parallax in arcsecs.

For this star it will be 1/.0003612 = 2768 parsecs
A parsec is 3.26 light years so this star is about 9000light years distant.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, wxsatuser said:

From Gaia the parallax is 0.3612 mas

To find the distance in parsecs divide 1 by the parallax in arcsecs.

For this star it will be 1/.0003612 = 2768 parsecs
A parsec is 3.26 light years so this star is about 9000light years distant.

The parallax error in DR2 is +/- 0.0557, so the star's distance is between about 7,800 and 10,700 light-years. I believe these small parallaxes (large distances) are not so reliable in this data release.

Edited by Waddensky
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Waddensky said:

The parallax error in DR2 is +/- 0.0557, so it's distance is between about 7,800 and 10,700 light-years. I believe these small parallaxes (large distances) are not so reliable in this data release.

Yes, just showing an example so the op can see if the quoted distances are close or not.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Gazer 1996
      Barely used, no damage.
      £40 or nearest offer
      Contact me for anymore information!

    • By Rhushikesh-Canisminor
      Hello!
      I am looking for variable star databse using which I can practice star light curves in spreadsheet programs.
      I am doing this as my statistics project where I can do visualization, little bit of error reduction etc.
      I did see a few ones like AAVSO, but they either need some specific job title or specific star etc.
      I need something to have in general, like here is the data-choose what star option you want etc.
      Thanks!
    • By BinocularSky
      The July edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. Astronomical darkness returns to the southern part of the UK this month, and we have:
      * Yet another "promising" comet
      * Asteroid Ceres
      * Neptune and Uranus return
      I hope this helps you to fill your evenings (actually, more likely pre-dawn mornings!) enjoyably.
      To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab, where you can subscribe (also free, of course) to have it emailed each month, and get archived copies.

    • By Rhushikesh-Canisminor
      Hello!
      I have been really inactive here, so apologies.
      Here are a few images of the Solar Eclipse, happened on 21 June 2020. It was annular, but partial from Mumbai region (around 60% covered). Maximum phase of the eclipse was at around 11:30 a.m. IST.
      This is actually onset of our 4-5 months of monsoon season, so getting decent skies was a tough part. Luckily got decent cleared patches here and there with occasional rains.
      I had to use whatever I had to make a comfortable view of the eclipse, thanks to the lockdown.
      I simply took a box, made a whole of the size of the eyepiece on one end, cut the opposite side and attached a paper. I had to do little bit here and there attachments for perfect angle. But was really happy with the results. 
      One of the best experience was when I was seeing the Sun while it was drizzling at the same time.
      Thanks!
      -Rhushikesh Deshpande.




    • By Dannomiss
      So after ordering the skywalker heritage telescope (awaiting 3 weeks for delivery), I decided after reading through a lot of posts on here to also purchase some binoculars so I can start getting used to the sky and what to look for. (Althought its now cloudy for the next 2 weeks. Typical!

      Anyway, at first I ordered the Praktica 7x50 Falcon Porro Prism Binoculars which cost £27. I was advised that the 7 x 50 would be the best for my needs because of the wide view. However I decided in the end to purchase the Olympus 10x50 DPS I Binoculars which cost £59.99. I am not sure I ahve made the right decision, but I made the decision on the basis of my eyesight and that even with glasses I have certain eye issues and thought the extra magnification would help. Even though I udnerstand the lense shake and stability hence the original 7 x 50 choice.

      The Olympus also had a lot more reviews and positive feedback. Well they arrive tomorrow so I will feedback on what i think. 🙂

      What do others have and recommend? And have a I made the right choice?
       
       


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.