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A_P_O_L_L_O

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Because I was not a member here when I recorded these :)

 

I love the sun, and 99% of what I do is animations.   Ive studied the sun for 10 years now, and have actually made a new phenomena discovery.    I have talked about them on many social forums but nobody has ever caught up with me on imaging them. Alot of people just flat out tell me they can not  see them and that these do not exist, but I have, time after time proven their existence. Repeatedly.  I have even documented exactly how they form with scientific literature. Yet   I am still the only person that has ever imaged them, after I announced the discovery.

 

 I have even been permanently banned from cloudy nights, AND solarchatforum for showing how to build the filter arrangement to image these things.

I started to call the phenomena ferrets, because it is directly related to an iron "fog",  tracing a magnetic surface flux.  Iron being ferrite. Thus, "ferret's"..  .  No other amateur has ever recorded or documented them.  Scientifically they are referred to as "serpentine lines".   You cannot see them by stacking images and this is why they have gone unnoticed by all solar imagers.  They are visible for only a matter of seconds, and can only be seen with real time imaging. They are extremely short lived, and sometimes they stretch across the entire surface of the sun.

 

Anyways,

 

My Name is Apollo Lasky and I introduce myself here, to the stargazerslounge.   If I bother you, please, kindly let me know.  

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=148861

https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/576967-non-protuberance-filaments-393nm-a-new-solar-feature/

 

apollo-lasky-aligned_pipp_1505560018.gif.f32e16d3aea7e551b92a07e38c27325b.gifapollo-lasky-septermber-10th-2017-loop-prominence_1505823501.gif.6e843d833a52ca76aa04ea95f91fc8c7.gif

Apollo-P-Lasky-Long-ferret---solar-serpentine-line-by-apollo-lasky_1540170220.gif.21de73ebf29adfa3234e3b1b34b1b28d.gifApollo-Lasky-calci-filament2_1487458528.gif.cfd44ea179af329af5c4967ccd79592c.gif782977410_Apolloferrets-photosphericserpentinelines.jpg.2fd0716a1ffb5a386ecaf02ab1e44109.jpg

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Hi Apollo,

Welcome to the forum.

Are you saying this is a discovery you have made, or just that you are the first to see it with amateur equipment? Is it reported in scientific journals etc?

Stu

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Some very impressive images and animations there. As a pretty experienced solar imager and observer, I cannot say I have observed these features, but maybe the modest aperture I use (80mm max for Ca-K and H-alpha)  cannot detect them. Besides, I was not on the lookout for these features. I can definitely see some filamentous detail in your images. What equipment do you use to capture them? The latter two look like Ca-K images. As an image processing researcher, I am wondering whether an automated detection method could be developed, to see if these filaments can be detected automatically in other images as well. It might well be that post-processing techniques used by many obliterate these fine features. Should the 80mm aperture suffice to detect these structures, I could have a look through my archive of unprocessed (or only stacked) images to see if such filaments can be found. 

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17 minutes ago, Stu said:

Hi Apollo,

Welcome to the forum.

Are you saying this is a discovery you have made, or just that you are the first to see it with amateur equipment? Is it reported in scientific journals etc?

Stu

It is certainly my discovery, nobody has ever imaged this, nor tried to explain it.  There are some pieces online about serpentine field line's but this was all simulation based trying to explain coronal heating jets with magnetic re-connection  but has zero association with what I have photographed as being a visible photo-spheric phenomena.    It is not reported in any scientific journals.

 

Do a google search for serpentine field line, see what comes up :)   You will see my images match the theoretical diagrams perfectly, these diagrams are the only evidence I can find that can prove what I am imaging.   

 

It has never been documented because the imaging technology just did not exist until recently for violet wavelengths, and most imager's focus on hydrogen alpha, and stacking single images.  I made note that the ferrets are not visible in stacked images, and are essentially invisible during maximum solar activity because the faint feature get's over exposed by active regions. 

Another explanation why they were never discovered is because the solar focus was always on high flare activity. Ferrets were always concealed by the high activity, and 15 years ago high solar activity was all the buzz.

  There are some documentations on research gate about magnetic serpentine line's dated from 2014 but they explain nothing.

 

Now that there is zero solar activity, we easily find the ferrets and realize that yes, they are something new associated with solar minimum,

This is a major activity during solar minimum.

 

 These are literally tracing some field activity like a wake caused by a boat.  

 

I have confirmed the discovery with several world class solar imagers, and they will all agree that this is my discovery.  

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I see that stacking could also obliterate faint structure, unless special care is taken. It is interesting that you note that the structures can only really be seen during low solar activity (if only because it gives us something to look for). I am currently working on a project with the Kapteyn Astronomical Institute and other groups of professional astronomers to detect faint structures surrounding galaxies, including ultra-diffuse dwarf galaxies. It would be interesting to see whether such techniques could be used to detect the structures you see. The nice thing about our method is that they also give a statistical likelihood that the structures detected could be generated by random noise. So again, what equipment did you use to create these images, and what post-processing was used (if any).

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7 minutes ago, michael.h.f.wilkinson said:

Some very impressive images and animations there. As a pretty experienced solar imager and observer, I cannot say I have observed these features, but maybe the modest aperture I use (80mm max for Ca-K and H-alpha)  cannot detect them. Besides, I was not on the lookout for these features. I can definitely see some filamentous detail in your images. What equipment do you use to capture them? The latter two look like Ca-K images. As an image processing researcher, I am wondering whether an automated detection method could be developed, to see if these filaments can be detected automatically in other images as well. It might well be that post-processing techniques used by many obliterate these fine features. Should the 80mm aperture suffice to detect these structures, I could have a look through my archive of unprocessed (or only stacked) images to see if such filaments can be found. 

You can definitely see them with your lunt 2.4 angstrom calcium filter,  believe it or not the calcium wavelength is loaded with Iron sub tracers.    I actually called this fact the "Solar iron majority"  .  I have documented this trying to explain why these "ferrets" are there.

 

https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/581229-the-solar-iron-majority-393nm/

 

All the images I capture with are with a standard 90mm x 800mm meade scope. You can definitely see them with 80mm.   

 

I am currently building a prototype telescope to observe these things with greater resolution, because there are zero telescopes on the market that are corrected for 393nm.      I have tried repeatedly to get major companies to make 393nm corrective optics as well, but nobody will make anything less than 20+ pieces.     It is a slow process. Telescope inventions are not cheap, milling parts is not something everybody has access to and designing optics is not easy.

 

I have even invented an optical tilting device that allowed me to make this discovery!   I Had a mutual  partnership established with williams optics but I could not afford to follow through.

 

Some people may have heard of the device, it is called "Skybender"  and I gave away over 20 units free of charge world wide trying to get people to see what I was.

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13 minutes ago, A_P_O_L_L_O said:

You can definitely see them with your lunt 2.4 angstrom calcium filter,  believe it or not the calcium wavelength is loaded with Iron sub tracers.    I actually called this fact the "Solar iron majority"  .  I have documented this trying to explain why these "ferrets" are there.

 

https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/581229-the-solar-iron-majority-393nm/

 

All the images I capture with are with a standard 90mm x 800mm meade scope. You can definitely see them with 80mm.   

 

I am currently building a prototype telescope to observe these things with greater resolution, because there are zero telescopes on the market that are corrected for 393nm.      I have tried repeatedly to get major companies to make 393nm corrective optics as well, but nobody will make anything less than 20+ pieces.     It is a slow process. Telescope inventions are not cheap, milling parts is not something everybody has access to and designing optics is not easy.

 

I have even invented an optical tilting device that allowed me to make this discovery!   I Had a mutual  partnership established with williams optics but I could not afford to follow through.

 

Some people may have heard of the device, it is called "Skybender"  and I gave away over 20 units free of charge world wide trying to get people to see what I was.

I assume you are referring to the spherical aberration that is often poorly corrected at 393 nm, even in an APO triplet like mine (which can still produce razor sharp images in good seeing). Having said that, this aberration is reduced very much by using slow optics, so I could put my 80mm tri-band ERF on a colleague's 100mm F/10 scope, creating an effective 80mm F/12.5. At such a focal length, there should be no problems, and the use of a tri-band ERF (which passed small bands around Ca-K, H-alpha and the solar continuum band in green) reduces heat build-up in the tube, thereby reducing tube currents. I have not noticed any tilting problems when imaging Ca-K on my largest chip, but could look into that later.

As a scientist, I do have one worry: that these structures are simply caused by a superposition of noisy structures and granulation in the images. This could be tested by generating noisy images with simulated granulation using e.g. Markov Random Fields, but without any filaments added explicitly. That would allow me to rule out artefacts caused by noise.

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I am an inventor and I have  custom engineered filters :)  , I developed The narrowest calcium  filters ever manufactured with the highest transmission in the world. over 90% at 1 angstrom. fully blocked xray to 1500nm

 

The only tilt tunable calcium module in the world, 100% designed by me.

IMG_6806.JPG.e61e8c8aa5484fe105ad4b13213215f7.JPG

996434727_000frontviewfiltercells12548to28000.JPG.f61326dcbce9e666219c8bcab937e28b.JPG

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1358861512_003askewfrontskybender125in48mm002.JPG.918411010c07455e28eb7a54c42f265b.JPG

1913170297_004topviewfilterholder003.thumb.JPG.5e99d7a54f6d81346babb2ec7c13fb8c.JPG

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, A_P_O_L_L_O said:

I am an inventor and I have  custom engineered filters :)  , I developed The narrowest calcium  filters ever manufactured with the highest transmission in the world. over 90% at 1 angstrom. fully blocked xray to 1500nm

 

The only tilt tunable calcium module in the world, 100% designed by me.

IMG_6806.JPG.e61e8c8aa5484fe105ad4b13213215f7.JPG

996434727_000frontviewfiltercells12548to28000.JPG.f61326dcbce9e666219c8bcab937e28b.JPG

140700444_001frontview1.25cellin48mmcellmacro.JPG.955ef04d7de6327abc250c9f98ebcfa3.JPG

1358861512_003askewfrontskybender125in48mm002.JPG.918411010c07455e28eb7a54c42f265b.JPG

1913170297_004topviewfilterholder003.thumb.JPG.5e99d7a54f6d81346babb2ec7c13fb8c.JPG

 

 

 

OK, so the tilt refers to the filter, rather than the camera. That makes sense

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1 minute ago, michael.h.f.wilkinson said:

I assume you are referring to the spherical aberration that is often poorly corrected at 393 nm, even in an APO triplet like mine (which can still produce razor sharp images in good seeing). Having said that, this aberration is reduced very much by using slow optics, so I could put my 80mm tri-band ERF on a colleague's 100mm F/10 scope, creating an effective 80mm F/12.5. At such a focal length, there should be no problems, and the use of a tri-band ERF (which passed small bands around Ca-K, H-alpha and the solar continuum band in green) reduces heat build-up in the tube, thereby reducing tube currents. I have not noticed any tilting problems when imaging Ca-K on my largest chip, but could look into that later.

As a scientist, I do have one worry: that these structures are simply caused by a superposition of noisy structures and granulation in the images. This could be tested by generating noisy images with simulated granulation using e.g. Markov Random Fields, but without any filaments added explicitly. That would allow me to rule out artefacts caused by noise.

You know I had a dozen people argue with me about that aspect too, and then I found them on Gong, and then on SDO..... :)

 

I took every scientific appoach to fully prove what I was seeing is real.  I called it the "solar magnetic anomaly" because I agree, it should not of been there.     I have tried and tried and tried to find everything to make sure this is real.    Everyone comes to the same conclusion,  They are real....    

 

 Now with gong, I have the exact date and time and moment of capture aligned with my image. So any scientist can take all the FITs data they want and compare it to any other instrument..  The crazy part is that the final proof was in the low laying hydrogen alpha chromosphere, just weak enough so that the photosphereic iron tracer is slightly visible.     This brings us back to the the "solar iron majority".  Even the h-alpha line has iron subtracers.    

 

There is an area slightly above the photosphere, and slightly below the chromosphere. That's where the ferrets are like to linger, like  a fog over a lake.  

 

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=148861

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3 minutes ago, michael.h.f.wilkinson said:

OK, so the tilt refers to the filter, rather than the camera. That makes sense

Camera used is a basler 1300-30gm gigabit ethernet monochrome camera.

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i have been doing this for 10 years,  i have done hundreds of filter experiments and thousands of filter combinations so its not like, some random event..  I have built 10 solar telescopes, and have three more in development right now.  One of which is just for the ferrets.

205831366_newpositionofcak1.jpg.25f62444a438c7202f568c477f236407.jpg

829221347_apollocalciumk-linebraggfilter.jpg.d46d3b2c844204ed18e7f42b074ad47f.jpg

 

 

 

I have documented everything how to replicate the results so anybody that wants to capture them, can..  

 

Tilt is absolutley vital to changing the wavelength on a sub angstrom degree, I spent 5 years of my life researching just how filtration affects light on the sun...  

1136542862_Skybenderfiltertiltingtmb2.gif.5651649b335307255c9b07baffd862f8.gif

 

 

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I dont mess around ;)  Im a good guy.  I got no reason to lie, and I have spent close to 20,000$ using trial and error to get where I am today.

I do own an 80mm x 1200mm F/15 RVR optical telescope as well....   Its just not the same as having a telescope  that is 203mm, desinged specifically for 393nm wavelength at .98 strehl :)          Aperture is everything.  Full aperture energy rejection is a must, a single made custorm refractor scope with UV400 spec is $10,000....  

 

1648343955_mk393solartelescope.jpg.8f22eed7c22ff063207ca4b07aa69652.jpg

 

2393.thumb.jpg.4acc6c20b25fcba3481320af84f49035.jpg

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2393b.thumb.jpg.1dd035481c7434aaef775524e6e236c2.jpg

 

 

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Basler_acA1300-30gm__21387166__20180309_132451463_f01.gif.2f58e4443c147a086c3202397a393f58.gif

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21 minutes ago, A_P_O_L_L_O said:

You know I had a dozen people argue with me about that aspect too, and then I found them on Gong, and then on SDO..... :)

 

I took every scientific appoach to fully prove what I was seeing is real.  I called it the "solar magnetic anomaly" because I agree, it should not of been there.     I have tried and tried and tried to find everything to make sure this is real.    Everyone comes to the same conclusion,  They are real....    

 

 Now with gong, I have the exact date and time and moment of capture aligned with my image. So any scientist can take all the FITs data they want and compare it to any other instrument..  The crazy part is that the final proof was in the low laying hydrogen alpha chromosphere, just weak enough so that the photosphereic iron tracer is slightly visible.     This brings us back to the the "solar iron majority".  Even the h-alpha line has iron subtracers.    

 

There is an area slightly above the photosphere, and slightly below the chromosphere. That's where the ferrets are like to linger, like  a fog over a lake.  

 

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=148861

In that Space Weather post of a GONG image I cannot really see the structure you mean, or rather, I see many similar patterns in the background texture, and see no reason to single out that particular one. What really is needed is multiple, preferably simultaneous recordings of the sun from different locations, and use of statistical methods to prove that these aren't features that emerge from stochastic processes.

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Hi Apollo and welcome to SGL. :hello2:

An interesting post. I am at present purely a 'white-light' solar observer and intrigued by your Skybender. I have two questions...

  1. is Skybender a cheaper or dearer version of other Hydrogen-alpha 'scopes and filters that exist? :icon_salut:
  2. what do/will dedicated solar observers gain from it? ...unless I have misread something. :help:
Edited by Philip R
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8 minutes ago, michael.h.f.wilkinson said:

In that Space Weather post of a GONG image I cannot really see the structure you mean, or rather, I see many similar patterns in the background texture, and see no reason to single out that particular one. What really is needed is multiple, preferably simultaneous recordings of the sun from different locations, and use of statistical methods to prove that these aren't features that emerge from stochastic processes.

the good thing about gone, is that it is all stored online in high resolution. frame by frame.

 

https://gong2.nso.edu/products/scaleView/view.php?configFile=configs/hAlpha.cfg&productIndex=0

 

There is more than one location, and you can compare all the gong information directly with SDO.  The image sequence i put up for space weather was 100% captured. In the shortest cadence time, second by second.   It was literally a full capture.   Just input the exact date and time, for cerro tololo and you get the full resolution images.

 

Spaceweather uses image compression.  Gong has all the fits data, and raw format

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16 minutes ago, Philip R said:

Hi Apollo and welcome to SGL. :hello2:

An interesting post. I am at present purely a 'white-light' solar observer and intrigued by your Skybender. I have two questions...

  1. is Skybender a cheaper or dearer version of other Hydrogen-alpha 'scopes and filters that exist?
  2. what do/will dedicated solar observers gain from it? ...unless I have misread something. :help:

Skybender is the only optical tilt module in the world designed specifically for telescopes, 100% customize to any wavelength you want.  Yes it can do hydrogen alpha and hydrogen beta if you have a 1.0 angstrom filter and install a collimator.   It can do calcium right out of the box.  It can do iron, it can do sodium, it can do helium, it can do mercury, it can do aluminum, it can do magnesium, it can do any element on the sun.  You can buy alot of the filters off ebay beleive it or not.  $140.00 for the 1.0angstrom h-alpha filters.  $299 for the 2.4 angstrom calcium filters.      

 

you need to build the proper energy rejection  pre-filter setup, and also the desired finalized transmission by the specific wavelength blocking filter.     Its not any different than a coronado or lunt system.  You just build it yourself.  All solar telescopes operate on the same principle.  Energy rejection, narrowband filtration, infrared rejection, ultraviolet rejection,  intensity control,  polarized reflective extinction, and out of band blocking.   

 

edit: i forgot to add the all important collimated / parallel / telecentric light path.

 

IMG_6629.JPG.5aa980211ef140c4b512a1843423e299.JPGIMG_6630.jpg.5655f925b3e076ccfb00962daa03f3b7.jpgIMG_6631.JPG.01c006eea6a59571582d381e9abc8b5e.JPG

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Edited by A_P_O_L_L_O

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All solar filtration systems are multi element optical devices.  The operating parameters work specifically on temperature. 

I designed this chart awhile ago to make it very simple for anybody to understand.    Filtering light waves, is no different than panning for gold using multiple mesh screen s

You start with a large coarse mesh filter, and end with micro-mesh filter.    In the case of light,  micromesh, is actually an angstrom mesh :) usually called an etalon, but the way technology is today any coating manufacturer can design you a sub angstrom single element single cavity hard coated bandpass filter that will perform equal to or better than any faby-perot etalon.

 

 

508613663_Idealenergyrejectionchartupdate.PNG.a5143b26b7a51b74da3188fc31f67089.PNG

 

 

 

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My favorite thing about  skybender in my opinion, is that when connected to a full spectrum modified DSLR camera and do wonderful things..... Like fluorescence or flowers and insects/ fish/ rocks, infrared photography, microbiological staining experiments etc.  Its not just for telescopes.....  Its for anything that requires a filter.  Including telecommunications that requires fiber optic encryption.......

1963765973_TigerLilly.GIF.d140cde573f0f590f86ec8763310b49d.GIF

You can also do night time imaging of nebula and such but i live near chicago so that is impossible for me, thats why I focus on the sun.

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As I have stated I have been banned from other chat forums and people have attempted to scrub everything releated to my name, but there are still some traces on the internet of my posts about ferrets that will never be removed , especially the comments from world class imagers.  Including Comments from Valery Deryhuzin, the president of Aries instruments suggesting i get a grant to study the ferrets.  Comments from Mark Townley stating they are real.  comments from  Alexandra Hart, solar imager of the year and featured on national geographic, she is also presented directly on https://solarscope.co.uk/.com home page, she has also stated that she has seen the ferrets but never thought anything about them other than it was her imagination.  Comments from Christian Viladrich (WORLD FAMOUS IMAGER)  requesting the exact day time and moment so he could also prove they were in fact on gong like I had shown.

 

So as you can see, this is a very well documented on going issue directly associated with my name ;)

https://solarchatforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=25251

https://solarchatforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=25256

https://solarchatforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=25219

 

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Some of those posts seem to be asking whether you have submitted any scientific papers about your discovery. Can I ask why you haven't done this so it can be properly peer reviewed and confirmed (or otherwise)?

That would seem to be a sensible step to take.

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2 hours ago, Stu said:

Some of those posts seem to be asking whether you have submitted any scientific papers about your discovery. Can I ask why you haven't done this so it can be properly peer reviewed and confirmed (or otherwise)?

That would seem to be a sensible step to take.

I just do not know how, or even where to start.  Who would I send it to, who do I contact?  What would I write?   I feel that when other people actually attempt to replicate the images and reveal these ferrets as well,  this officially becomes a scientific fact. Anything with replicated results becomes undeniable and then there is no other conclusion to be made.    I have very reputable people confirming all this for more than a year, so its not like anybody can steal the publication. It needs to be verified by multiple individuals.

 

All scientific discoveries must be replicated by other parties with no relation to the discoverer.  The individual(me) making the claims can say whatever he wants but that doesnt make it a fact.  This is why I am trying so hard to get other people to actually see these things.    

 

If anybody wants to help me get published,  I will gladly give you some credit for the assistance. I need all the help I can get because all science involves team work.  Anybody that images them, gets their images and names published as part of the collaborative team effort of people who discovered this.

 

I have tried my hardest to build a team.  The solar imaging world is extremely tiny, and not everyone owns a calcium filter to even attempt the imaging.   Most people dont even own a telescope that can provide clean focus with a calcium filter.  All optics, have very poor strehl ratio down at 393nm unless it is an F/15 telescope. Strehl ratio is what determins if your scope is diffraction limited or not.  All sct telescopes, are .5strehl below 400nm. That is terrible and can never achieve good focus!

 

F/15 telescopes are extremely long, and people are reluctant to own them, but they have the highest strehl ratio you can get providing the cleanest images..

  I have two f/15 telescopes. ;   a 150mm x 2250mm f/15.  Its more than  8 feet long and I cannot even mount it. the thing weighs 35lbs, and i need mount with a 70lb payload capacity,  EQ8 minimum which costs $3k to $6k..  I produce very minimum income, and have the lowest paying manual labor jobs humans are offered so my money saving capability is a slow process to acquire the parts.  .    

I also have a 80mm x 1200mm f/15, it has great focus at 393nm but I am limited by my eq4 mount.  The slightest chicago breeze sends the thing flip flopping all over the place and I get zero stability with imaging.

.   As you can see from the picture, the 80mm f/15 telescope is more than half the length of a 6' door.

 large aperture F/15 telescopes are difficult to work with due to their length, they require a very potent mount to account for the "moment arm"

 

I also have a very minimal income. so its not like I can spend 7000$ on the proper mount to get the 150mm 8 foot telescope operating.  

 

IMG_6820.thumb.jpg.5e3e548a0f1747e9161586957c47db4b.jpg

 

 

 

Scientific discoveries are not cheap.... The astronomy world, is not cheap...    Heck, its $7000 just for a 60mm etalon from isle of man!   

https://optcorp.com/products/solarscope-sf-60-60mm-0-7a-h-alpha-solar-filter

 

 

Edited by A_P_O_L_L_O
removed the double posted image.

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Forgive me Apollo but this all seems a bit odd!  One of the great things about our hobby is that committed amateurs can make a contribution to scientific discovery.  I do not know enough about solar imaging to comment on the validity of your work but you write with some passionate intensity.  Given your committment how can you not know suitable research bodies where you can share your work?  A 2 minute Google search gave me several options e.g. NASA, university research departments such as Imperial college and so on.

 It is interesting to see your work but it is a big thing to believe you have made a new discovery and you need to share this with the professional scientific community.  So get on with it man! You won't progress this on internet fora

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38 minutes ago, MartinB said:

Forgive me Apollo but this all seems a bit odd!  One of the great things about our hobby is that committed amateurs can make a contribution to scientific discovery.  I do not know enough about solar imaging to comment on the validity of your work but you write with some passionate intensity.  Given your committment how can you not know suitable research bodies where you can share your work?  A 2 minute Google search gave me several options e.g. NASA, university research departments such as Imperial college and so on.

 It is interesting to see your work but it is a big thing to believe you have made a new discovery and you need to share this with the professional scientific community.  So get on with it man! You won't progress this on internet fora

I will look more into university contacts.   However It just seems a little out of the ordinary to send actual PH.D , and NASA officials  phone calls and emails that state  "hey i found something on the sun, can you look for it?  You cant see it with your eyes because human eyesight cannot visually perceive 393nm......, Oh Also it disappears in less than 60 seconds., oh and one more thing you can only see them in real time. No lucky/speckle imaging....,."

 

   One of the problems i face is the constant banning from forums and the removal of my files from the internet.  I have had gigabytes of data deleted with very clear evidence, so I have to acquire new data now.  This is very difficult in the winter, and these file deletions have really damaged alot of the work I have already achieved.    Raw video data is very large and consumes incredible amounts of hardisk space so saving all the information without multiple terabytes is impossible.  

 

I owned the domain 393nm.com and I recieved a TOS violation for getting too much download traffic, they shut down the site and I have yet to find a new internet host for the amount of bandwidth with these data files.

 

One high resolution solar imaging session can fill up a 2 terabyte SSD completely in just 30 minutes, 14bit raw data fills it up even faster.    The faster  frame rate cmos camera's also eats up your disk space exponentially.  Just 60 seconds of capture time at 240fps is twenty eight 500 frame subfiles, each at 1.2 gigabytes..   

 

twenty eight files at 1.2gigs each..  For just 60 seconds......   How do I email that?  Where do i Post it?  :)  it is rather difficult to upload 30 gigabytes of raw uncompressed data.   Companies literally require entire data centers for this kind of operation.

 

Here is very tiny example   from my google drive. This is a direct download to a  100 megabyte gif file animation.  I have a 15gb file limit.  So i will be filling it up very rapidly,  I have to use multiple gmail accounts for just 1 hour of imaging.

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1zXOCLHw7HQwqIXCDEVgW5xzBLM-4RgR_/view?usp=sharing   

  Not much you can do with .gif file except drag and drop into your chrome browser or internet explorer browser ,  maybe load it up into virtualdub.   But,  .gif file compression is junk. Totally useless.  

 

 I have tried to upload raw high definition video data to youtube,  This was ultra high uncompressed resolution, timelapsed.   But youtube compression turned it to junk.  (right click the video option tab and hit loop)  

 

 

 

 

Edited by A_P_O_L_L_O

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Google “Nature Astronomy” That will then give you all the info. you need to start a peer review process of your work.

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