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BinocularSky

Binocular Sky Newsletter, December 2018

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The Binocular Sky Newsletter begins it's 8th year! The 7th Anniversary edition is nothing special, but we have:

* Comet 46P at naked eye visibility
* Mira and Chi Cygni near maximum
* Uranus still available in the evening
* Pleiades and Orion Nebula are evening objects


The nights are longest this month, so you'll have plenty of opportunity to see --  and share -- what the sky has to enthrall us with.

(Or, for the pedants among us, "...what the sky has with which to enthrall us." ? )

To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab. You can also subscribe (also free) and have it emailed each month.

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Steve,

Mind if I share a link to your website on our club Facebook page? We have a lot of people who come to our public viewing events asking about our equipment and I think some are put off by how big and expensive some of our rigs are. I've told several that they can do astronomy with a simple pair of binoculars, but I don't think they know what to look at. Your newsletter filled with targets might be just the thing they need to get started.

Side note, I was actually out looking for 46P/Wirtanen last night with my little Steiner Predator 10x42's. I live in a fairly light polluted area so all I saw was an extremely faint wisp. Certainly not naked eye visible and barely detectable in my binoculars from my location. Had I not read up on what to expect on Sky & Telescope I probably would have missed it or mistaken it for a galaxy.

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On 30/11/2018 at 11:26, Buzzard75 said:

Steve,

Mind if I share a link to your website on our club Facebook page?

Please do. The whole purpose of it is to "spread the word" that binocs are very useful for astronomy and to get people looking up and enjoying our universe, so it's all done on a Creative Commons license (as is the website) so that people can share/use whatever they want as long as they don't do it commercially.

 

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7 hours ago, BinocularSky said:

Please do. The whole purpose of it is to "spread the word" that binocs are very useful for astronomy and to get people looking up and enjoying our universe, so it's all done on a Creative Commons license (as is the website) so that people can share/use whatever they want as long as they don't do it commercially.

 

Thanks, Steve! Hopefully you'll get a few more subscribers out of it. We have approximately 1000 followers on our Facebook page and our most recent public events have had anywhere from 150-200 people in attendance. Like I said, I often make the recommendation to start with binoculars as a lot of people already own a pair, they just don't know what to look at with them to start.

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Thanks Steve, you never know I might get to have the same pleasure comet Lovejoy gave on this new comet using the binoculars.

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4 hours ago, happy-kat said:

Thanks Steve, you never know I might get to have the same pleasure comet Lovejoy gave on this new comet using the binoculars.

Easy in 6.5x32 binoculars at the moment and trivially obvious in 10x50.

Edited by BinocularSky

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    • By BinocularSky
      The November edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have:
      * Uranus still available
      * Comet 46P
      * Mira brightening
      * Asteroid occultation for southern England
      So grab those binocs (or small telescope) and enjoy the glories that the night sky has to share with us.
      To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab. You can also subscribe (also free) and have it emailed each month.
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