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ACross

COMPLETED - Steel pier - surface rusted

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I have a steel pier for sale. This was purchased along with a pulsar dome and believe it is an older Pulsar model. The pier sat in a yard, exposed to the elements for a few years before I purchased it so there is some surface rust and flaking paint but will clean up nicely.  £250 and buyer will need to collect from Suffolk. 

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Yes, the pier is still available but due to its weight you should be able to collect from Suffolk.

Edit:  If you were wanting this before Christmas, I am around today but not available after that until 30th Dec.

 

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Hello,

No not required for Christmas, so until after the 30th December would be fine. I am very interested in this. Collection from Suffolk should not be a problem for me. First refusal please.

 

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