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Littleguy80

Campbell's hydrogen star

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Campbell's hydrogen star first came to my attention after I purchased an H-Beta filter. It was one of twenty or so objects on a list of targets suitable for the filter. It's a small planetary nebula in Cygnus. HD 184738 is the star sitting at the centre of nebula which is red in colour. A hubble image and more details can be found here: 

https://www.spacetelescope.org/images/potw1337a/

Tonight I had a short session at my local dark site which was ended prematurely by cloud. Before the cloud arrived I was able to log my first observation of Campbell's hydrogen star. Starting at Albireo and moving up to Cyg 9, I used SkySafari to identify the little planetary neb. It's tiny but reasonably bright. At 133x it definitely had a red tint when compared to the stars around it. Adding the H-Beta filter brightened it noticeably. I increased magnification to 200x and then 300x. The size of the nebulae increased compared to the stars around it but still remained very small. I was really pleased to have finally observed this. From one H-Beta target to another, I next observed the California nebula. Faint but quite easy to catch an edge when observing under dark skies. The California nebula is very different to the tiny planetary, being large and diffuse. While the H-Beta filter is most commonly referred to as the Horse Head filter, I've been really pleased with the other less famous targets that I've been able to observe with it.

Interstellarum star chart showing Campbell's hydrogen star. For reference, SkySafari lists it as ARO 11.

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Nice report :thumbsup: I've been thinking of a H-beta...

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1 hour ago, niallk said:

Nice report :thumbsup: I've been thinking of a H-beta...

I was lucky and got a secondhand 2” Astronomik one for £60. There’s quite a few targets you can use it on. It should help bring out the M43 region in Orion. Also good for the Trifid in Sagittarius. If you’re a SkySafari user, I created an observing list of H-Beta targets:

 

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Thanks Neil for the information on Campbell's hydrogen star - I was not aware of it. I will have a go with my H.Beta next time out.

 

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Neil your thread made me undertake some more research and in Sue French's book ''Deep Sky Wonders' I picked up information on Minkowski 1-92 (shown on your chart) which is a Protoplanetary Nebula at mag 11.7. Apparently if you use a high magnification you can see a 'Footprint' - hence the name Minkowski's Footprint.

So I will have a go at both the Campbell's HS and this Footprint hopefully on the same night.

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1 hour ago, Mark at Beaufort said:

Neil your thread made me undertake some more research and in Sue French's book ''Deep Sky Wonders' I picked up information on Minkowski 1-92 (shown on your chart) which is a Protoplanetary Nebula at mag 11.7. Apparently if you use a high magnification you can see a 'Footprint' - hence the name Minkowski's Footprint.

So I will have a go at both the Campbell's HS and this Footprint hopefully on the same night.

Good find, Mark. I’ll have a go at that myself. Thanks for sharing :)  

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Very good report of an interesting and unusual object Neil. I have a 1.25” Lumicon Hb filter which, embarrassingly remains unused by me. Need to sort that.

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2 hours ago, Stu said:

Very good report of an interesting and unusual object Neil. I have a 1.25” Lumicon Hb filter which, embarrassingly remains unused by me. Need to sort that.

Thanks Stu. I was determined to go out and make use of mine so I could feel justified in buying it! Seen some great targets as a result :) 

Edited by Littleguy80
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15 minutes ago, Littleguy80 said:

Thanks Stu. I was determined to go out and make sure of mine so I could feel justified in buying it! Seen some great targets as a result :) 

You set a fine example! If ever the weather co-operates around a planned dark site trip I will give mine a go in the 14”

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Very interesting account and link Neil. This tiny reddish planetary had escaped my attention, focused more on the close by and not easy observation, super nova remnant that comprise the Little Veil.  Also as Mark has remarked, the Minkowski's Footprint, another interesting object to pursue, a lot to go on in this vicinity. Anyhow as you describe, increasing power enables the gas glow to become apparent, one to note (along with Minkowski's Footprint) for another time. Good that you are gaining a little more on the California, repeated attention will increase definition as the season evolves, quite looking forward to this to. 

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1 hour ago, scarp15 said:

Very interesting account and link Neil. This tiny reddish planetary had escaped my attention, focused more on the close by and not easy observation, super nova remnant that comprise the Little Veil.  Also as Mark has remarked, the Minkowski's Footprint, another interesting object to pursue, a lot to go on in this vicinity. Anyhow as you describe, increasing power enables the gas glow to become apparent, one to note (along with Minkowski's Footprint) for another time. Good that you are gaining a little more on the California, repeated attention will increase definition as the season evolves, quite looking forward to this to. 

The little Veil being SH2-91! I didn’t realise that until you mentioned it, Iain! I just had a read of Gerry’s account of seeing this last September with his 15”. How tough is the little Veil? I get the impression it’s out of reach of my 10”, at least at my current experience level. 

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That's right Neil SH2-91 and Gerry's account is a very good guide for this. In the vicinity are other Sharpless objects such as SH2-94 and SH2-96. As with all of these difficult or to put another way, elusive objects, its just about getting your eye to become more attuned to the yet dimmer and fainter, which you understandably are doing. Worth an attempt, could be one to wait until next season maybe as best elevated as possible. It took myself some effort to grasp and comprehend, I am still learning to see it and distinguish in its features but I now have the competence to focus upon it at least once or twice each season. This is what I really enjoy, testing your eyes (and I would bet that your younger eyes will probably be more able than my own),  judgement and ability, in the right conditions many of these - more perceived challenging observations, are in fact probable. Also using to the very best the equipment that you currently have, venturing to dark skies, fully dark adapted pupils, the right placement for the target, patience and always honing your observation skills and ability-  that is all it is and needs to be about. 

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