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BinocularSky

Binocular Sky Newsletter, November 2018

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The November edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have:

* Uranus still available
* Comet 46P
* Mira brightening
* Asteroid occultation for southern England

So grab those binocs (or small telescope) and enjoy the glories that the night sky has to share with us.

To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab. You can also subscribe (also free) and have it emailed each month.

Edited by BinocularSky
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Thanks this is very timely as I take my new 100mm Binos from Altair Astro to La Palma ?

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