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mark81

M110 confirmation

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Hi all, just a quick one, last night I finished up a session with M31 as I have been meaning to have a closer look for the other two galaxies there.  Couldn't see anything else untill I nudged the scope up and just as M31 left the FOV I noticed a small grey glow - so definate space between them .

No matter which star atlas I look in they all display M32 and M110 on top of M31.  So was that 110 or 32? 

Thanks Mark

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What scope and magnification were you using? At low magifications, Messier 32 is very small and bright - almost star-like. It's located to the south of Messier 31, very near to the core. Messier 110 is a subtle haze, a bit difficult to see under mild lightpolluted conditions. It's about half a degree north of Messier 31's core.

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6 minutes ago, Waddensky said:

What scope and magnification were you using? At low magifications, Messier 32 is very small and bright - almost star-like. It's located to the south of Messier 31, very near to the core. Messier 110 is a subtle haze, a bit difficult to see under mild lightpolluted conditions. It's about half a degree north of Messier 31's core.

Thanks

I was using an ST80 at x26 with very good seeing conditions.  

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Assuming a 15mm 50 degree afov eyepiece giving x26 and a 1.9 degree field of view, M110 should have been visible in the same field as the core as in the attached image. Does this look correct?

As said, M32 is fairly much stellar at low power, like a fuzzy star closer to the core. M110 a fuzzy oval further away on the opposite side.

1B587E65-891D-4A8C-8DB6-4F2BB7D4DDBB.png

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Just now, Stu said:

Assuming a 15mm 50 degree afov eyepiece giving x26 and a 1.9 degree field of view, M110 should have been visible in the same field as the core as in the attached image. Does this look correct?

As said, M32 is fairly much stellar at low power, like a fuzzy star closer to the core. M110 a fuzzy oval further away on the opposite side.

1B587E65-891D-4A8C-8DB6-4F2BB7D4DDBB.png

That's the one!  Maybe I didn't nudge the scope up as much as I thought.  Thanks Stu

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2 minutes ago, mark81 said:

That's the one!  Maybe I didn't nudge the scope up as much as I thought.  Thanks Stu

Don’t forget also that you would not see M31 extending as far as shown in the image because it gets faint quickly as soon as you get away from the core.

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Yes, since the ST80 only allows you to see the bright core of Messier 31, both galaxies may seem much further apart than in pictures or on charts. Congratulations! Messier 32 is up next I assume? :)

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22 minutes ago, Waddensky said:

Yes, since the ST80 only allows you to see the bright core of Messier 31, both galaxies may seem much further apart than in pictures or on charts. Congratulations! Messier 32 is up next I assume? :)

Indeed. With the darker nights coming, I will have a closer look..

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8 minutes ago, mark81 said:

Indeed. With the darker nights coming, I will have a closer look..

Actually under a really dark sky a widefield refractor can really start to show you the full extent of M31. It might be worth getting something like a 24mm 68 degree eyepiece to get a large field of view, doesn't have to be stupidly expensive 

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59 minutes ago, Stu said:

Actually under a really dark sky a widefield refractor can really start to show you the full extent of M31. It might be worth getting something like a 24mm 68 degree eyepiece to get a large field of view, doesn't have to be stupidly expensive 

I've always been put off because of the low mag they yeild.  But with the use I get out of the 15mm I will definitely look into one in the future

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9 minutes ago, mark81 said:

I've always been put off because of the low mag they yeild.  But with the use I get out of the 15mm I will definitely look into one in the future

It depends to a degree on the skies you have access to. The 24mm will give you 4.8mm exit pupil which may give a more washed out view under light polluted skies. Under nice dark skies however the additional field of view would be lovely for  those larger objects such as some of the big open clusters, M31 and M45.

If you have a UHC or OIII filter aswell, you could give the Veil and NAN a go. Dark skies, good dark adaptation, filter and a big enough exit pupil should give you a decent view. Worth a try to get some additional variety out of the scope.

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6 minutes ago, Stu said:

It depends to a degree on the skies you have access to. The 24mm will give you 4.8mm exit pupil which may give a more washed out view under light polluted skies. Under nice dark skies however the additional field of view would be lovely for  those larger objects such as some of the big open clusters, M31 and M45.

If you have a UHC or OIII filter aswell, you could give the Veil and NAN a go. Dark skies, good dark adaptation, filter and a big enough exit pupil should give you a decent view. Worth a try to get some additional variety out of the scope.

Very dark skies here on the west Norfolk coast so it sounds like a good idea .  With Christmas coming up... Who knows ?

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On 05/10/2018 at 18:18, mark81 said:

I've always been put off because of the low mag they yeild.  But with the use I get out of the 15mm I will definitely look into one in the future

These short focal length RFTs are ideal for open clusters. I love the views through my Bresser 102xs with BST 12mm on M13, M34, M45 and NGC884/869.

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