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Ham radio ISS contacts


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Howdy folks! I was just curious how many amateur radio operators are on the forum. Also have any of you made Ham contact with the ISS? I'm currently working on a hand held dual band yagi antenna. I've

Have'nt done ISS but I did several with the Space shuttles and regularly used the Japanese Fuji sats FO20/29. Plus Oscar's 10 and 13 which gave world wide coverage. BTW I'm G1HWY Here are the

Hi, Theres a guy down the end of our road who has talked to the ISS. He's got a quite incredible aerial setup, though! I've never been round to see how it's all operated, radio is something

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My grandfather was a HAM, previously he was a radio operator on HMS Repulse and submarines and ended up teaching radar at Cranfield.

My dad was more interested in radio control, starting by building bang-bang servos and valve transmitters/receivers. Now he uses gigahertz kit and despairs of some of today's RC'ers who don't even understand how a fuse works...

I've got an SDR setup with a ~2m yagi for meteor detecting using Graves radar. I must admit I'm tempted to try using it to pick up slow scan TV from the ISS, apparently Russian crews set this up from time to time.

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I remember the first time the space shuttle operated on VHF over the UK, it was mayhem.

It was not the proudest moment for amateur radio I'm afraid. From AOS to LOS it was bedlam with people calling willy nilly and someone broadcasting Nellie the Elephant by Mandy Miller trying to block signals from the shuttle.

I did manage to hear W5LFL but didn't try to contact with my QRP setup.

 

I'm G0DKR by the way but G6XWR when the above happened.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Nice! Thanks for that info since I'll be using a UV 5 or UV 8 when I attempt it. Unfortunately I've had to put this project on the back burner for a bit. 

On a side note, had a pass of the ISS the other night that would of been perfect for it. The -2.4 pass took six minutes according to my tracker. Unfortunately I was at work so all I could do was watch.

 

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My old dad was G3YGU, he maintained his license even after many years of radio silence. He was strictly HF only and talked to the States frequently. When He died I had a serious trip down memory lane as I cleared the remnants of his shack. 

I kept his old station log books and his framed RAE certificate, which are still at the side of my bed still. I still hear the heterodyne whistle and smell the solder when my mind wanders back to my childhood, looking over his shoulder.

I passed the RAE in '81 when I was 16/17 but never took up a license for various reasons. 

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Sounds like memories to definitely hold on to. Glad to hear that you kept his logbooks. Those are one of a kind things that was strictly his.

There is just something about the hums and whistles that definitely carry a person back in time. When I got my general license, people tried to get me to buy new digital equipment. Nope, not for me. I gotta have the hums and whistles. Both of my HF radios are old tube boat anchors. Swan 500c and Heathkit HW 101. 

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  • 1 year later...

I’m a ham but never tried to make contact with the ISS. To be honest my station has been packed up since we moved house nearly three years ago 😟 . Need to get it sorted. 
 

I do fancy trying to grab one of their QSL cards (the ham version of a post card to confirm a contact) that the licensed hams on board sometimes send via SSTV. Think one if the Russians currently on board is transmitting on and off at the moment. 
 

As for getting licensed-if you know one end of a soldering iron from the other then the M6 foundation license is very straightforward. The 2x0 intermediate licence is eminently achievable given a bit of study. If you can get your head around astronomy you can get your head around the material. 
 

The M0 full licence is a different kettle of fish and being a member of a local ham radio club is desirable although I did the RSGB distance learning course and found a friendly club that let me sit it there. I somehow scraped a pass. 
 

Great hobby to be involved in and with all the digi modes etc there’s plenty of scope to get into some niche areas :)  

73 de M0SDB

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4 hours ago, merlin100 said:

This is my humble setup. 😉

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The good thing is an expensive station is not needed to reach all round the world.

Yes it's easy to spend a fortune but simple gear can still do the job.

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6 hours ago, wxsatuser said:

The good thing is an expensive station is not needed to reach all round the world.

Yes it's easy to spend a fortune but simple gear can still do the job.

Very true. My Yaesu FT-817ND that I sold about 2 years ago, was used portable a lot. It even got me a contact with Ian VK3MO on 20m with just 5W, mind you, Ian's stacked yagis are something else! 

I must admit, I do like my valve (tube) amplifier. This is the second amplifier I've owned, the last one was traded in part exchange to buy the Alpin 100 MKIII. That was an Ameritron AL-811H. I love seeing glowing glass valves, must be something from my childhood! 

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