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Olli

Reflector or frac for imaging?

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Hi

Sorry to bring this up i know there are many different opinions about this. 

After going back and forth if i should get a scope for visual or go for a nice imaging rig i have decided to go for the latter as thats what im really interested in ( thanks to you lot).

I am currently planning  on what i want to get as my imaging set up and stuck which scope to get.

 I wont be getting my equipment untill christmas ( present to my self ) i have tried to narrow it down but cant. What do people seem to enjoy more?

I also like to point out that i love the diffraction spikes that you can get., ive heard you can only do this with a newt? 

I will be Probably image Nebulae and galaxies as thats where my interest lies most. I think im going to be using a mono camera have no idea which one yet.

I would like to hear your thoughts on what i should go for. 

All help/advice is much appreciated 

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Well, the Skywatcher ED 80 is a very popular scope for DSO imaging.

Coupled with the HEQ5 it should keep you busy for quite some time.

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/pro-series/skywatcher-evostar-80ed-pro-heq5-pro.html

or bump it up a fair amount to

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/esprit-professional-refractors/skywatcher-esprit-ed-80-pro-triplet.html

or

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/esprit-professional-refractors/skywatcher-esprit-ed-100-pro-triplet.html

 

It all depends on the size of your wallet.

?

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I would not use an RFT unless it could be permanently set up in an observatory. The RFT is my weapon of choice. 

They don't suffer from flexure, focusing is easier and they also have more thermal stability. And above all. There's no collimation. 

As for what make-model. I would look seriously at Altair Astro and the wide range of AA fracs they have to offer.

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RFT in an observatory? Most people put their rich field telescopes on photo tripods ?

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Olli,

I’m new to this forum but have done a lot of imaging, including teaching it. Actually, I think you’d find substantial agreement among practised imagers about the best sort of scope to go for if you’re starting out. As the guys have said, shortish focal length refractor. 80 to 100mm aperture, preferably apo. And a good solid mount that swallows it up.  For example, a set-up I enjoyed using for several years was a 98mm William Optics apo on an EQ6; before that, an 80mm. People do image successfully with Newtonians, of course, but I doubt that anyone would put them forward as first choice. By comparison with a Newt, a decent refractor frees you from worrying about collimation, cools down quickly and doesn’t really have ongoing thermal issues, is compact and much easier to mount solidly - as Anthony says, a Newt will wobble around and be more affected by wind, and wobbling of any kind, as well as loss of true in the optical train, will wreck the quality of your data. With bigger scopes and longer focal lengths, everything in imaging gets more difficult - and potentially annoying. So, I know we hum and ha constantly around scopes, eyepieces, etc, but I think that, for once, there is a straight answer to your question. Get the frac.

And please don’t think that if you do you’ll be settling for some sort of ‘beginner’s set-up’!  With the right camera, it’ll continue to be an optimal choice for exciting wide-field work. There is some great stuff shown on this site that proves the point.

However, I’d like to add a ‘BUT’.  A nice small apo refractor is superb for imaging and delivers beautiful images when used visually as well. But it’s still a small refractor. I have a nice refractor and a bigger SCT and Dobsonian. The frac gives lovely jewel-like images, which arguably are aesthetically more pleasing, but the bigger scopes show more.  So, before plumping, I’d suggest being very clear that getting started in imaging is your priority. Of course, the best solution is to get both. ?

John

TEC140, C11, 14.25in Dob, AZ EQ6, EQ6, QSI camera with Astrodon filters, eyepieces mostly TV Delos AND Plössls and Tak orthoscopics, Baader MkV binoviewer, numerous boxes of clutter.

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27 minutes ago, JTEC said:

Olli,

I’m new to this forum but have done a lot of imaging, including teaching it. Actually, I think you’d find substantial agreement among practised imagers about the best sort of scope to go for if you’re starting out. As the guys have said, shortish focal length refractor. 80 to 100mm aperture, preferably apo. And a good solid mount that swallows it up.  For example, a set-up I enjoyed using for several years was a 98mm William Optics apo on an EQ6; before that, an 80mm. People do image successfully with Newtonians, of course, but I doubt that anyone would put them forward as first choice. By comparison with a Newt, a decent refractor frees you from worrying about collimation, cools down quickly and doesn’t really have ongoing thermal issues, is compact and much easier to mount solidly - as Anthony says, a Newt will wobble around and be more affected by wind, and wobbling of any kind, as well as loss of true in the optical train, will wreck the quality of your data. With bigger scopes and longer focal lengths, everything in imaging gets more difficult - and potentially annoying. So, I know we hum and ha constantly around scopes, eyepieces, etc, but I think that, for once, there is a straight answer to your question. Get the frac.

And please don’t think that if you do you’ll be settling for some sort of ‘beginner’s set-up’!  With the right camera, it’ll continue to be an optimal choice for exciting wide-field work. There is some great stuff shown on this site that proves the point.

However, I’d like to add a ‘BUT’.  A nice small apo refractor is superb for imaging and delivers beautiful images when used visually as well. But it’s still a small refractor. I have a nice refractor and a bigger SCT and Dobsonian. The frac gives lovely jewel-like images, which arguably are aesthetically more pleasing, but the bigger scopes show more.  So, before plumping, I’d suggest being very clear that getting started in imaging is your priority. Of course, the best solution is to get both. ?

John

TEC140, C11, 14.25in Dob, AZ EQ6, EQ6, QSI camera with Astrodon filters, eyepieces mostly TV Delos AND Plössls and Tak orthoscopics, Baader MkV binoviewer, numerous boxes of clutter.

Thanks for that advice appreciate it :)

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I started with the ED80 on a HEQ5 mount and yes, it is a very nice setup. About a year ago I bought a Saxon 200DS (rebranded SW 200PDS) and must say I love it. f/5 compared to f/7.5 makes a huge difference. I have a smaller FOV (objects appear larger) and require half the exposure time. With a DSLR noise increases significantly after 180sec exposures dur to the sensor heating up. Collimation isn't all that hard. I use a home-made collimation cap and can do it in a couple of minutes. The draw back is that with the guide scope (SW ST80) attached the mount has reached its limit. Wind does become a problem and a larger mount would be recommended.

The ED80 gives a very crisp image but on fainter objects I was always battling noise from the sensor. One day I will get a cooled camera - maybe...

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