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I've not opened the link yet but yes HA and any narrowband filter will be alot better with longer than normal subs..10mins plus..

But depends on you setup and equipment used

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7 hours ago, david_taurus83 said:

Looks good to me! Just need more subs! What equipment did you use and how much went into this?

20180809_212915.jpg

Thanks! This was taken with a Canon 450d astromodified and a Astronomik 12nm clip filter. This is 6 hours and 30 mins of 5 min subs

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I have the same filter with a 600D so I'm pleased to see what can be achieved with a DSLR. It'll never be as sensitive or noise free as a cooled CCD/CMOS but you have pulled off a good result I think. Would probably benefit from more exposure time.

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3 hours ago, david_taurus83 said:

I have the same filter with a 600D so I'm pleased to see what can be achieved with a DSLR. It'll never be as sensitive or noise free as a cooled CCD/CMOS but you have pulled off a good result I think. Would probably benefit from more exposure time.

Alright thank you. Let’s just hope that the skies will be clear!

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