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Mrastronomer101

Collecting MicroMeteorites During The Perseids

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1 minute ago, John said:

Micrometeorites are a maximum of 2mm in size, the vast majority are considerably smaller. By the time they reach Earth they have little or no velocity and are drifting down under their own weight.

I was pondering on this very fact earlier this evening.  It struck me (hah!) that it's entirely possible that due to their low mass, micrometeorites from the Perseids might drift about in the atmosphere for weeks before actually landing on someone's roof.

James

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52 minutes ago, John said:

Micrometeorites are a maximum of 2mm in size, the vast majority are considerably smaller. By the time they reach Earth they have little or no velocity and are drifting down under their own weight.

 

 

If one can feel sleet less than 2mm smacking the skin on a windy winters day why could one not feel the same size but heavier objects called micrometeorites on a windy day ?

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8 hours ago, SIDO said:

If one can feel sleet less than 2mm smacking the skin on a windy winters day why could one not feel the same size but heavier objects called micrometeorites on a windy day ?

I'll be "feeling out" for micrometeorites from now on and will examine myself for micro impact craters each time I shower :smiley:

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10 hours ago, John said:

I'll be "feeling out" for micrometeorites from now on and will examine myself for micro impact craters each time I shower :smiley:

Or you could just check your gutters like everyone else, after I stop laughing I'm going to check all my mirrors and objectives for microscratches. Maybe my light buckets are catching more than just light...lol...

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On 11/08/2018 at 01:50, SIDO said:

If one can feel sleet less than 2mm smacking the skin on a windy winters day why could one not feel the same size but heavier objects called micrometeorites on a windy day ?

I'll let you know when ive been hit by one............

haha

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You'd feel this:

Campo de Cielo.

I have a couple of fragments, and they are big enough to ruin your day (or kill you) if hit by one. You get a lot of iron meteorite for your money when you buy a Campo.

campo-del-cielo-26.jpg

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
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I had an "iron meteorite" when I was a lad, given to me by an uncle, according to him it had been handed down since Victorian times, it was about as big as my ( at the time ) fist.

Also a similar sized lump of blue glass supposed to have been unearthed somewhere local.

He was probably pulling my leg but any way they got "lost" when we moved house when I was 10YO, I think my mum chucked them out as rubbish :grin:

Dave

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The laws of physics are the same for all matter, momentum and inertia do not act in weird unpredictable ways just for micro meteorites. We have just been instructed that meteorites so rarely hit humans ( wich is so silly since they are in continued and ongoing mass freefall and have been for billions of years, they are what you are standing on, lol ) we can't consume the actual real truth that they often do and quite often so often it is common. I even find them at the bottom of our family swimming pool. 🙂

Edited by SIDO

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8 minutes ago, SIDO said:

The laws of physics are the same for all matter, momentum and inertia do not act in weird unpredictable ways just for micro meteorites. We have just been instructed that meteorites so rarely hit humans ( wich is so silly since they are in continued and ongoing mass freefall and have been for billions of years, they are what you standing on, lol ) we can't consume the actual real truth that they often do and quite often so often it is common. I even find them at the bottom of our family swimming pool. 🙂

Terminal velocity within Earths atmopshere is 120 Mph. I still wouldnt like to be hit by something falling at that speed.

Talking about speed..............i heard the new Mars probe is traveling at 160 kps (kilometres per second). Cant get my head around that. 

 

Edited by LukeSkywatcher

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Fortunately most micro meteorites are falling with the force of an average snowflake, thanks to our atmosphere. 

I have a hard time realizing we are traveling 66,600 mph and rotational galactic speed coupled with galactic forward speed equates to us being 1.4 million miles somewhere to our left just one hour ago.

 

Edited by SIDO

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My understanding is that micrometeoritic dust arrives at the earths surface at a rate of around 100 tons a day.

Spread over Earth’s surface, that amounts to a "hit" of just one particle per square metre each year. The largest particles are just 1 mm or less in diameter.

Here is a recent Sky & Telescope article which is relevant:

https://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/new-study-hunts-for-rain-gutter-micrometeorites/

Note just how much material had to be examined to isolate 500 candidate particles - 300 kilograms collected from an area of 30,000 square metres.

 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, John said:

My understanding is that micrometeoritic dust arrives at the earths surface at a rate of around 100 tons a day.

Spread over Earth’s surface, that amounts to a "hit" of just one particle per square metre each year. The largest particles are just 1 mm or less in diameter.

Here is a recent Sky & Telescope article which is relevant:

https://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/new-study-hunts-for-rain-gutter-micrometeorites/

Note just how much material had to be examined to isolate 500 candidate particles - 300 kilograms collected from an area of 30,000 square metres.

 

 

 

One hit per square meter each year, very suppotive of what I have been saying, thank you John.

Edited by SIDO

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23 minutes ago, SIDO said:

One hit per square meter each year, very suppotive of what I have been saying, thank you John.

When you are killed by a micro-meteorite, send me an email.

LOL

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3 minutes ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

When you are killed by a micro-meteorite, send me an email.

LOL

I never once said anyone got hurt by a micro meteorite or that it was even posiible, don't understand why folks take up the defensive postition that I have, it is fantasy. The facts state I have never implied such a statment condone it or am willing to accecpt the blowback from making it.

The sarcasm is unwarranted and misapplied, the argument behind it incorrect 🙂

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20 minutes ago, SIDO said:

I never once said anyone got hurt by a micro meteorite or that it was even posiible, don't understand why folks take up the defensive postition that I have, it is fantasy. The facts state I have never implied such a statment condone it or am willing to accecpt the blowback from making it.

The sarcasm is unwarranted and misapplied, the argument behind it incorrect 🙂

You did say this in an earlier post in this thread which might have confused things:

"..... I just said folks get hit all the time. Pretty amazing we are being pelted on our knoggins quite regular and there's so few injuries...."

 

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8 minutes ago, John said:

You did say this in an earlier post in this thread which might have confused things:

"..... I just said folks get hit all the time. Pretty amazing we are being pelted on our knoggins quite regular and there's so few injuries...."

 

It was ment in the context of my other previous statement lumping micro meteorites and meteorites together as they are all meteorites.

Taking statements out of context during scientific debate often leads to the assumption of facts. One must always follow the dialog closely 😉 

Edited by SIDO

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1 minute ago, SIDO said:

...TaKing statements out of context during scientific debate often leads to the assumption of facts. One must alwaysfollow the dialog closely 😉 

Thanks for that advice on how debate on forums. Much obliged I'm sure :icon_salut: :icon_biggrin:

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1 hour ago, SIDO said:

I even find them at the bottom of our family swimming pool. 🙂

How do you find them?

 

1 hour ago, SIDO said:

One hit per square meter each year, very suppotive of what I have been saying, thank you John.

This seems like an incredibly low rate?

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I think with this thread Stu I am content and agree to disagree, I think with that being said and my points well made I must digress in further discussion on the topic.

A wonderful weekend for everyone I hope. Ω

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3 minutes ago, SIDO said:

I think with this thread Stu I am content and agree to disagree, I think with that being said and my points well made I must digress in further discussion on the topic.

A wonderful weekend for everyone I hope. Ω

It was a genuine question, not a disagreement.

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On 09/08/2018 at 04:06, Mrastronomer101 said:

set a small cardbox box somewhere open or up high put a piece of paper and a magnet underneath and leave it there for 2 maybe 3 depending on weather conditions.

Did this last night from 22.00 to 8.00 a.m; my old and rarely used microscope will be put to good use again - for the first time, a completely un-medical use; very curious. How do I get the sample from the paper to the object slide? Suggestions, please.

Stephan

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