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Liquid-sun

Question about images and what you actually see through the telescope

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33 minutes ago, ollypenrice said:

Colours can be measured and calibrated so that the same camera which can take a convincing colour photo in daylight can take one over longer exposures at night. There is no reason to suppose that it becomes inaccurate in its colour balance when doing so. And there are plenty of stars varying between blue and red which allow the astrophotographer to check that the camera is delivering the right colours. I use a star's published B-V colour index in conjunction with a B-V colour chart to check a selection of stars in the field of an image. The resulting image, I believe, will be very close to what an enormous and colour sensitive eye would see. 

By the way, Saturn is a deidedly warm colour to my naked eye, tending towards light orange and very different from Jupiter.

Olly

But your comparing a cameras sensor to the human eye as what I’m mainly talking about is the actual eye and how far color can be seen . In order for the human eye to see color a given object must be a certain size to do so and the farther an object is away the smaller an object is making it harder to see color . Here’s a short article that explains what I’m getting at and the short video kinda explains quickly what is said in a shorter way . BTW seeing Saturns colors naked eye also depends the distance in orbit Saturn is to Earth and just how good individuals eyes are . Not everyone has perfect vision . 

https://www.livescience.com/33895-human-eye.html

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On ‎11‎/‎08‎/‎2018 at 11:19, Radioamateur said:

Aperture is king

Yup, it's OK through the 8", but 12" is more than many beginners have available and I don't get a view like that!

It does make you wonder though if you could take a spaceship close enough to say M42 so that they eye could be a comparable distance away to the standard processed image you see created by the imagers I wonder what colour/s you would actually see?

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On 18/08/2018 at 15:02, celestron8g8 said:

But your comparing a cameras sensor to the human eye as what I’m mainly talking about is the actual eye and how far color can be seen . In order for the human eye to see color a given object must be a certain size to do so and the farther an object is away the smaller an object is making it harder to see color . Here’s a short article that explains what I’m getting at and the short video kinda explains quickly what is said in a shorter way . BTW seeing Saturns colors naked eye also depends the distance in orbit Saturn is to Earth and just how good individuals eyes are . Not everyone has perfect vision . 

https://www.livescience.com/33895-human-eye.html

You are forgetting that a human eye cannot see colour in the dark. We need a certain amount of light to exite the right nerv endings in our retina

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44 minutes ago, Waldemar said:

You are forgetting that a human eye cannot see colour in the dark. We need a certain amount of light to exite the right nerv endings in our retina

No i did not forget , if you had read the article to the end you would have read where it said there must be at least two light sources to produce color ..... , thanks for mentioning that tho . 

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4 minutes ago, Waldemar said:

Sorry Ron, my bad...

No please don’t apologize , no need . Glad you mentioned it tho cause the article explains better than i do . Article talks about cones of our eyes . I say light sources because I don’t know the parts of our eyes except pupil and iris ;) . 

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Thank you. Yes there are cones and rods. to keep it simple I called them nerve endings.

Rods are for lower light levels and register only mono. Cones are for higher light levels and register also colour.
The central fovea, the focuspont of our lens, is only populated with cones. That is why we see more with averted vision in the dark: More rods are available there to register low light conditions. 😉

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