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Eyepiece and filter kit?


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I'm very new to all this and have brought a 6" Skywatcher Dobsonian. With my telescope, I got a 25mm eyepiece and 10mm. I was looking online for more lenses and came across this Celestron Eyepiece and filter set.

Where I need help is do I really need a kit like this or should I buy individual lenses? My other question is do filters make a difference and are they recommended. 

All recommendations are welcome, 

Thank you for reading.

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Hiya,

Personally speaking, I'd recommend staying with what you've got for now. As you use them  you'll start to identify their shortcomings, and get a better view of the sort of features you want in an eyepiece (field of view, magnification, eye relief, etc). They you can research particular eyepieces, and start building up your own set. I've never seen a EP and filter set I was impressed with ...

Kev

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The starter eyepiece sets are usualy poor value as while you may end up with a usable eyepiece or two (doubtfull) you’re paying for other rubbish accessories. As mentioned better to buy decent budget eyepieces separately.

Can be a good idea though to buy a zoom eyepiece which will let you find out which focal lengths work for your scope. One of the budget 8-24 or 7-21 zooms can be had for £25.00 to £30.00. Will also teach you a lot about using the right amount of magnification as how quite often reducing the magnification actually gives you a better view.

Edited by johninderby
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 Hi Final Pr0di9y,

I second kev100's opinion. I have used this kit, on the filters I have only used them to dim the intensity of light when viewing Venus and the Moon very rarely. Of the eyepieces I used 32mm quite a bit (and still do) for low magnification wide fields. Way back I used the 4mm eyepiece on planets on a 4 1/2" 900mm scope - it did the job but the very low eyepoint made it a devil to use! If you are in a hurry it may be better to purchase a decent (like for example from the Celestron Omni series) lower power eyepiece like the 32mm for wider views, if your seeing allows maybe one higher power eyepiece like 6mm for planets. 

Cheers!

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A Barlow lens is defiantly the right step forward with regards to using lower mm eyepieces (i.e 25mm / 20mm) for comfy Planet / Moon observing. I would agree the bundled EP's are substandard, that's because all the value is in the scope to be fair.

Take note of this site : http://www.astroboot.co.uk/AstroBoot

Here you will find some Barlows & EP's .. Keep an eye out for GSO Barlows & EP's. That's a nice first step up. From there you can decide on more Premium items. But it will allow you to start using the scope & learn the skies.

Best Rob

Edited by Rob
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Personally I would say "No!" to the set and go for individual/prime eyepieces. You may want an eyepiece that give a wider field of view (FOV) later on and that may end up with a duplicate of one you may already have in the set. Plossl's are about 50 deg. FOV. Another option is to buy a zoom eyepiece, (either 7-21mm or 8-24mm), as mentioned above and note which size gives you the best/pleasing view and then decide. 

Colour filters are useful for teasing out detail at different wavelengths. One filter that I call my 'Swiss Army Knife' filter is the Baader Neodymium. Some say the No: # 82A [pale blue] is their 'Swiss Army Knife' filter. 

Another filter I find useful is this variable polarising filter set ---> 5addf27ccac70_variablemoonfilter.jpg.e490ce031fc7badb2a139b6d8384c995.jpg  ...note: some polarising filters do not include the 1.25" eyepiece holder.

If you want to observe the Sun in white-light you will need a full aperture solar filter, either Baader safety solar film, (ready made or DIY) or glass, (can be expensive). DO NOT use anything else and remember to make a solar filter for your finderscope/RDF... better still remove them prior to viewing and use the shadow to line up/aim.

 

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Hi,

I also pretty new to all this and would agree to wait a while and use what you have.

The supplied ep's are probably not the best but I am sure are fine for now.

From my experience and what I read on here I think we are all the same when starting out and eager to buy something that will improve what we are seeing, sometimes because we are so underwhelmed at what we first see.  Truth is what we see is mostly very small and apart from the planets very feint.  I personally think one or two good quality ep's will do you far more good than a whole range of poor cheap ones. And do not be tempted to buy ep, that will provide high magnifcation then add a X2 barlow to get big images, there is a limit to the useful magnification you will get with any scope, takes a bit to realise when starting out.

 So the X2 barlow and your supplied ep's is not a bad idea for now.

Also there are loads of good 2nd hand EP's for sale fairly regularly on this forum so will save you lots in the long run. 

And regarding filters, again temptation to buy lots but in the end probably end up using very few of them for observing, as said maybe need an one one to reduce light intensity for viewing moon or venus, I bought quite a few and generally only use one a Baader Neodymium (not over expensive).

Spend your money carefully, believe me spending is easy in this game  ? .

Steve

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Thank you, everyone, for your recommendations they are all really helpful! Reading everyone's comments regarding eyepiece most people are saying getting a wider FOV (stupid questions is the FOV the same as the magnification e.g. 34mm has a wider FOV than a 10mm) what would be best for this 34mm? I have also noticed people recommending an X2 barlow lens.

So for now if I get a eyepiece with a wider FOV and a x2 barlow lens that would be a safe bet?

Edited by Final Pr0di9y
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Hi there. Do you have a particular 34mm EP in mind? 

As for the barlow idea, again personally speaking, I'd hold off on that for a while. With your scope (assuming it's a 1200mm FL) the max useable magnification in the UK will be around 200-240 times, so something like a 5 or 6mm eyepiece (Something from the BST starguider range, for example). I'd then go for a decent mid range eyepiece, something in the 12-16mm range (maybe an Explore Scientific 82 degree, or again a BST), and finally a low mag EP, 24-32mm (again, BST/Explore Scientific are well regarded). As for field of view, anything from 68 degrees and up will blow your current EPs out of the water, and you'll get a couple of years use before itching to upgrade. I don't use a barlow, and with a decent spread of EPs, feel a barlow is unecessary...

Just my 2 cents

Kev

Edited by kev100
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Hello, Chris,

can you tell us more about the scope you've bought? 6" Dobsonians are available usually with a focal ratio of 6, (f/6), which means a focal length of 900 mm, or as 6" (f/8) with 1200 mm focal length. They can be supplied with 11/4" or 2" focuser units; all these criteria have an influence on the choice of eyepieces. Moreover, what objects do you intend to observe? Moon and planets can be viewed with eyepieces of a smaller field of view, whereas extended objects (nebulas, some galaxies) will be observed better with wider fields of view. So, just let us know, so that we can give you sound advice; and have a read on the pinned thread "Eyepieces - the very least you need" here in the "Getting started - General Help and Advice" section.

Take yourself time with the decision; enjoy the journey!

Stephan

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Hi Stephan and Kev

My scope is this Sky-Watcher.

I have this information if it helps 153mm/1200mm and 2" focuser with a 1.25" adapter. I will hold off on the Barlow lens in that case. In regards to what objects I want to see right now I looking at planetary objects and the moon. I am currently reading "Turn Left At Orion" and at some point would like to move to Nebula, Clusters and Galaxies.

Edited by Final Pr0di9y
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43 minutes ago, kev100 said:

With your scope (assuming it's a 1200mm FL) the max useable magnification in the UK will be around 200-240 times, so something like a 5 or 6mm eyepiece (Something from the BST starguider range, for example). I'd then go for a decent mid range eyepiece, something in the 12-16mm range (maybe an Explore Scientific 82 degree, or again a BST), and finally a low mag EP, 24-32mm (again, BST/Explore Scientific are well regarded). As for field of view, anything from 68 degrees and up will blow your current EPs out of the water, and you'll get a couple of years use before itching to upgrade.

Given your info, Chris, kev 100's advice sums it up for me. You might consider a 2" widefield eyepiece like this, to get a max. field of view of 1,87°(frames the whole Pleiades cluster nicely!) for easy star-hopping at a magnification of 37x; depending on your budget:

https://www.teleskop-express.de/shop/product_info.php/language/en/info/p956_TS-Optics-WA32-ERFLE-Weitwinkel-Okular---32-mm---2----70--Gesichtsfeld.htmlhttps://www.teleskop-express.de/shop/product_info.php/language/en/info/p956_TS-Optics-WA32-ERFLE-Weitwinkel-Okular---32-mm---2----70--Gesichtsfeld.html

Stephan

Edited by Nyctimene
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Hi Chris, depending on the particular nebulae you might want to consider an OIII filter, and/or a UHC filter (either 1.25in or 2in, depending what EPs you choose). Neither will be in a filter kit. Big clusters, like the Plieades and the Beehive will need low mag, wide FOV, as Stephan has suggested. 'Smaller', denser clusters (globulars, or M46 & 47, or 36, 37 & 38, for example) will need higher magnification for you to be able to resolve individual stars. As for galaxies, the two main EPs I use for these are my 20mm Myriad (2in) giving x60, and, for more detail, my Explore Scientific 8.8 (giving x136). 

You don't need hi mag for galaxies or nebula.

Kev

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Hi Stephen and Kev,

 

Thank you both for your time with this! Looking at all the lenses and taking a budget and everything into account. Right now budget only allows for one lens. I am enjoying looking at the planatery objects so will this eyepiece do the job?  BST StarGuider 5mm.

 

Do any of you have a useful link where I can learn about FOV and Magnification?

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Hi Chris,

The 5mm BST will give you 240 times mag, which is at the top end of what's useable (at that mag things start to get a little fuzzy). It'll be very useful on the moon, double stars, globulars, etc. I have one and I like it a lot, but often I find that my 6mm EP (giving x200) gets more use and the views are crisper.

Kev

Edited by kev100
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Chris,

For the ins 'n' outs of choosing EPs, you might find this post a help in guiding you through the basics: "Eyepieces - the very least you need".

Also there is/was a primer ( "Understanding and choosing eyepieces" by Andrew* ) here in the forum, but I can't seem to find it any-more. 

I'd be tempted not to buy anything for now, just use what came with the 'scope. With eyepiece time under your belt you'll know what needs replacing or if there's a "gap" that needs filling.

HTH :D

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18 minutes ago, david o said:

I'd be tempted not to buy anything for now, just use what came with the 'scope. With eyepiece time under your belt you'll know what needs replacing or if there's a "gap" that needs filling.

HTH :D

You may be right, I may be running before I can walk here.

Although this was very useful and have learnt so much.

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Hi Chris,

The 6mm (x200) would definitely be good on planets, and the difference between it and the 5mm, in terms of mag, would be minimal. You have to bear in mind that the more you magnify the target, the more you magnify any atmospheric humidity, moisture, haze, pollution and whatever else there is in between you and the planet. Lower magnification often results in crisper views, albeit smaller ones. Higher magnifications on all but the crispest, clearest night can be disappointing. Having said all that, I often bung in the 5mm for the hell of it, just for a look, though more often than not I'll back off a bit because the view's better. My most used EPs, on planets, the moon, clusters, nebulae and galaxies are the 8.8mm and the 20mm. I could easily get by with just those two.

Of course, it's personal preference. 

Before you spend any money, are you able to have a look through another scope, at a club or other event? Going along to a star party (like the upcoming Astrocamp) is priceless, in that you get to try out all sorts of EPs and scopes, and really get a good idea of where you want to put your money ... and why.

Kev

 

Edited by kev100
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1 minute ago, kev100 said:

Before you spend any money, are you able to have a look through another scope, at a club or other event? Going along to a star party (like the upcoming Astrocamp) is priceless, in that you get to try out all sorts of EPs and scopes, and really get a good idea of where you want to put your money ... and why.

Hi Kev I'm looking at a club near around 45 mins away and they meet up the last Wednesday of the month. Astrocamp looks really good thou so thank you for that one. That is something I would definitely look into!

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Hiya. To get the right EP for you, it's definitely worth holding off until you get a chance to look though a variety of scopes and EPs. Having said that, if you went for a 5 or 6mm BST, I doubt you'd ever regret it. They're great EPs, and will definitely get used. 

There's no right answer in this. What works for one will be wrong for someone else, and the learning process always involves trial and error (and what you want to get out of the hobby will change over time too). Right now the planets are pretty well positioned, and higher mag for the planets, double stars, the moon and globular clusters is definitely the order of the day. Later in the year, when jupiter, Saturn and Mars have gone, it'll be time for big open clusters and galaxies, and that's when you'll want lower mag and wide fov.

Jupiter and Saturn in the 5mm will be amazing, in the 6mm also amazing, but just slightly sharper on all but the best nights.

Kev

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13 hours ago, kev100 said:

Having said that, if you went for a 5 or 6mm BST, I doubt you'd ever regret it. They're great EPs, and will definitely get used. 

There's no right answer in this.

kev is right, there's no real right answer, it will be down to your individual choice at the end of the day.
I have the same scope only larger at 200mm and its an f/6 focal ratio. Most if not all my eyepieces would work on your scope and to good effect, especially the BST ED Starguiders. They have  comfortable eye-relief, and 60° afov, and their pretty cheap  too, considering what you get. That said, some pretty expensive eyepieces have been used on my scope and in my opinion, were no better, so I've kept what I feel are the best ( check my signature ).

Now kev100 recommends two  BST's, now if their the Starguiders, its of my opinion that the 5mm will be less than useful on your f/8 scope, too powerful and the 6mm Starguider does not exist?

That said, the 8mm would  be a perfect match for an f/8 scope and/or the 15mm next. 

 

Edited by Charic
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