Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_30_second_exp_2_winners.thumb.jpg.b5430b40547c40d344fd4493776ab99f.jpg

Sign in to follow this  
Jeff-Colorado

I'm a believer now

Recommended Posts

I've read reports over the years that bino-viewers enhance the experience of solar system observing, so I finally decided to buy one. I didn't want to spend too much money, so I got the Celestron one for $175 on Amazon and since I already had one Celestron 8-24 EP, I bought a second one. I have an 8 SE scope.

The seeing was below average tonight, but it wasn't cloudy so I pointed my scope at Jupiter, not expecting much. Wow--the detail in the cloud belts was amazing with both eyes. I switched back and forth between bino-viewing and mono and I'm a believer now in bino-viewing (at least for solar system and brighter deep sky). It looks a bit 3D too (as others have said). It is absolutely worth the money (to me). 

I look forward to viewing Mars, the Moon, and globular clusters later this week when I go camping.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good stuff Jeff. I’ve been a slow convert to binoviewing but now do nothing else for solar, planetary and lunar observing. Still prefer mono for most deep sky, but binoviewers are great for reducing floaters and showing the detail. Some people don’t get on with them at all so I’m glad you do!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the report.. I was thinking of getting some binoviewers.. but wasnt sure, this report makes me think that it will be a good idea.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried them recently but despite several evenings using them I cannot get my eyes/brain to combine the image :(

On the upside, I bought a used pair from Steve at ENS and he has now bought them back from me, so I am not out of pocket too much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, cv01jw said:

I tried them recently but despite several evenings using them I cannot get my eyes/brain to combine the image :(

On the upside, I bought a used pair from Steve at ENS and he has now bought them back from me, so I am not out of pocket too much.

It’s not impossible they were out of collimation? I have struggled with binoviewers in the past, and I found certain versions with set screw fixings for the eyepiece could give me issues. That’s why I like the TS style ones with self centring eyepiece holders, they seemed easier for me to view with. The Baader Mark IVs I have only have a single set screw, not even a compression ring but the tolerance on the holder itself is so precise that there is no problem, except that some eyepieces won’t even fit! Luckily the only pair I use do fit perfectly. 

I have had 6 pairs now, and have settled on the Mark IVs and the TS now as suiting me. It has taken a number of years of perseverance to get there, but I’m glad I have because the floaters in my observing eye have worsened and this had been impacting my enjoyment of high power planetary observing. By effectively retraining my brain, I can now get the best out of them and floaters are much less visible. I am really enjoying Jupiter at the moment!

I guess I really just need a 5” or 6” apo frac to give a bigger exit pupil, but that is unlikely at the moment unfortunately.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought some a couple of years ago and after a few tries on Solar System objects just couldn't get along with them, others swear by them, I ended up the opposite so the only thing they're gathering is dust ATM
Occasionally dig them out for another try but I think it must be my eyes or maybe I just need to spend more money.

5 minutes ago, Stu said:

I guess I really just need a 5” or 6” apo frac to give a bigger exit pupil, but that is unlikely at the moment unfortunately.

Got the Tecnosky 6" but I don't think I've ever tried the binoviewer in it, will try on Jupiter to see if it helps, floaters were a problem last night trying to view it in the twilight.

Dave

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately I have an eye condition that precludes binoviewers but I can imagine the benefit.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Stu said:

It’s not impossible they were out of collimation? I have struggled with binoviewers in the past, and I found certain versions with set screw fixings for the eyepiece could give me issues. That’s why I like the TS style ones with self centring eyepiece holders, they seemed easier for me to view with. The Baader Mark IVs I have only have a single set screw, not even a compression ring but the tolerance on the holder itself is so precise that there is no problem, except that some eyepieces won’t even fit! Luckily the only pair I use do fit perfectly. 

I have had 6 pairs now, and have settled on the Mark IVs and the TS now as suiting me. It has taken a number of years of perseverance to get there, but I’m glad I have because the floaters in my observing eye have worsened and this had been impacting my enjoyment of high power planetary observing. By effectively retraining my brain, I can now get the best out of them and floaters are much less visible. I am really enjoying Jupiter at the moment!

I guess I really just need a 5” or 6” apo frac to give a bigger exit pupil, but that is unlikely at the moment unfortunately.

I think it is my eyes, i have pretty severe astigmatism which after research generally means I will struggle to use bino's.  After reading this I went outside and had a go with my trusty binoculars which I have used for years.  I tested looking through them 'normally' and then covering each eye and discovered that I only use them as a monocular!  In fact once I had focussed on something (in this case the church in town) i could not see my wife waving her finger in front of the right lens.  My right eye does nothing, so all my years of using binoculars I have been using one eye.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found with mine that if an eyepiece isn't centred properly (due to catching an undercut) the images won't merge so a miscollimated pair would show the same result. 

Edit: just seen the new posts. I did not know astigmatism could cause issues like that. 

Edited by Ricochet
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, cv01jw said:

I tried them recently but despite several evenings using them I cannot get my eyes/brain to combine the image :(

On the upside, I bought a used pair from Steve at ENS and he has now bought them back from me, so I am not out of pocket too much.

I had that problem initially, but after I rotated/tweaked each one and then adjusted the distance between them, it came into focus as a single image for me. Glad you were able to recoup most of your investment since they didn't work for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, cv01jw said:

I think it is my eyes, i have pretty severe astigmatism which after research generally means I will struggle to use bino's.  After reading this I went outside and had a go with my trusty binoculars which I have used for years.  I tested looking through them 'normally' and then covering each eye and discovered that I only use them as a monocular!  In fact once I had focussed on something (in this case the church in town) i could not see my wife waving her finger in front of the right lens.  My right eye does nothing, so all my years of using binoculars I have been using one eye.

Binoculars are probably a good test for anyone considering a bino-viewer. If you enjoy binoculars, you'll probably love bino-viewing of the solar system and brighter deep sky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, cv01jw said:

discovered that I only use them as a monocular!

That is normally down to having the inter occular distance incorrect, I assume you adjusted it? I guess it is possible your eyes are outside the range of adjustment, it does happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"binoviewers are great for reducing floaters". 

Just in the last couple week or so, i have realized that i have more floaters than usual. I also have hay fever for the first time in my life and its mainly effecting my eyes.

Honestly, the next piece of astro gear i want is a binoviewer.  I dont wanna spend a lot. 

BRB, there one (WO) for sale here on SGL with 2 same EPs for about 200 squids.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, I set both 8-24mm zoom EPs to 18 mm. You get a slight "zoom" from the extra length of the bino-viewer, so my guess is that it was roughly equivalent to a single 15mm on my SE 8. I had no problem focusing with those EPs and Jupiter looked sharp and detailed. On a night with better seeing, I'll zoom in more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Kronos831
      Hello guys! Its  me kronos, and i have been wondering about getting a binoviewer sometime in the near future!
      I do have some questions tho, (Binoviewer Budget Up to 200Euros *shipping and vat included)
       
      1)Which One??( Please recommend sites from the EU only,Brexit is happening in a few days and i live in the EU so rip FLO for me)
      2)Can i use my barlow lens on it(the lens part) i have a BST Barlow Or do i need to buy another one
      3)Can i use 1.25" filters ? and if so, can i stack them with the barlow lens?
    • By Hitman77
      SOLD! Admins - feel free to remove........Mint condition Williams Optics binoviwers with WO 20mm ep's and a pair of 25mm ep's. Comes as bought with WO barlow. 
      Retails new for £284 so grab yourself a bargain and have them for £190 plus packaging. Get in touch if you fancy taking advantage of the rest of the season.
      Andy


    • By JonH
      Hi All, 
      I have for sale the following:
      William Optics Binoviewer - £135. This is boxed and in excellent condition. SOLD.
      Telrad Finder - £22. This is boxed and in excellent condition although being used, it will need new sticky pads on the bottom. SOLD
      Baader Sky Surfer III - £15. This is also boxed and in excellent condition. SOLD.
      All items can be cash on collection or posted if the buyer pays postage.
      Also a heads up for future sales posts: most of the major items for a full PST mod, including PST, D-ERF filter, Coronado BF10, Vixen A80M, filter holder and finder. Also a MN190 + NEQ6. Pictures and prices to follow.
      Cheers,
      Jon







    • By Cosmic Geoff
      A review of a budget Binoviewer.
      As a preamble, binoviewers split the image so that it can be viewed by both eyes. These were originally invented for microscopes, where they are usually described as 'binocular viewers'  or the like, and seem to be in common use. If you are good in the workshop it is possible to convert a microscope binocular viewer for astronomical use - the used microscope viewers tend to be cheaper.  Why use a binoviewer? Essentially because two eyes are better than one. If you want to see what a binoviewer might do for you without investing a three-figure sum, try looking at this screen (or your HDTV) using just one eye, then the other one, then both together. Which is better?   So why are they not universally used? (1) cost and complication. (2) Light loss. (3) Adds about 10cm to optical path length.
      BST Starguider appears to be a trading mark of "Sky's The Limit" who supplied this item at a cost of £120.  They say that it is identical to the Arcturus binoviewer sold in the USA.  The device and packaging however are not marked with any name or identifying marks. In general appearance it looks like other budget binoviewers (a lot of the budget binoviewer brands come from the same factory.) It comes with two 32mm Plossl eyepieces, a x1.8 Barlow and a x3 Barlow, which is more accessories than most of these outfits offer.
      The unit appears fairly well made and is packaged with sealing bags, and various plastic caps. The eye-spacing is controlled by a hingeing arrangement (like conventional binoculars) The eyepieces are gripped by compression rings and at least one can be individually focused. The eyepieces are claimed to have a FOV of 48 degrees with 22mm eye relief. They are unmarked and look budget, and I suspect that given the clear aperture of the binoviewer itself is more like 25mm, some vignetting must occur.
      I tried the binoviewer first in daylight, using my 127mm Mak on a AZ-4 mount. In summary, it does work, and gives a distinctly 3-D view of satellite dishes and the like. The aluminium nosepiece can be unscrewed and replaced by one of the Barlows.  Getting focus in a Mak cassegrain telescope was no trouble at all, but the magnification seems higher than expected. Hopefully the Barlow lenses will allow focus to be attained in other designs of telescope.
      At night, on Mars and Venus, I could not get a clean image with my right eye without the Barlow lenses, but with x1.8 I could get a clean image with both eyes. The problem seemed to be with my eye, as I re-tried after rotating the binoviewer through 180 degrees. I compared the results with a regular 15mm Plossl and confirmed that the binoviewer results were acceptable considering the observing condtions.
      On the Moon there was a striking 3-D effect, and picking out fine detail seemed less of a strain when using both eyes.  Castor (double) was well split with the x1.8
      Last night I tried it on Jupiter with the x1.8. (magnification x100 - x120?) The seeing was awful, but I could make out two cloudbelts which seemed to have uneven edges. I have seen (glimpsed) more detail with regular eyepieces in previous seasons, but using both eyes seems less of a strain.
      I am still waiting for a 20mm Plossl eyepiece  to make up a 20mm pair.
      I bought a second 20mm Revelation Astro Plossl and was able to try them on 14th March. I found that with these I had difficulty in merging the images. This is not a fault with the binoviewer; the 32mm eyepieces still work fine. One of the Revelations has a safety groove on the barrel while the other has not. It dawned on me that the 32mm Plossls supplied are specially designed to minimise the path length, as the entire barrel apart from the eyecup goes inside the eyepiece holder. Not so with the typical astro eyepiece! With some fiddling around I was able to get the images to merge, and found that the 20mm eyepieces work quite well on Jupiter. Some extra winding of the Mak focus knob is needed to get them in focus (it is easier to do this on a bright star or planet).  On the Moon, the magnification seemed higher than nominal. With the x1.8 Barlow there was marked off-axis chromatic aberration, worse than with the 32mm eyepieces.
      In summary, binoviewing does work, and if you want to try it out with an entry-level device, this model, at half the price of some of the other popular binoviewers, seems worth buying.
       
    • By JonF
      Revelation binoviewer for sale, complete with two pairs of eyepieces. In very good condition, complete with original aluminium box, a pair of FMC 12mm wide angle eyepieces and a pair of FMC 20mm wide angle eyepieces. New from Telescope House the binoviewer alone is £125. For both sets of eyepieces plus the viewer the price is a mere £120, plus postage. Postage will be £8. Can also be collected from Victoria area of London.





×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.