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Posted (edited)

For the first time in my life I today saw moons other than our own moon. First light of my SW 200P  watching Jupiter, Callisto, Europa and Gandymede. Just had to let the world  know... Looking forward to darker night skies in the autumn (does not really get dark in Norway at mid summer).

Edited by Viktiste
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That is amazing! now you are hooked, enjoy every sight!

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Welcome from Land Down Under

Have a SW 250, and use for school, scout/guide groups presentation

Your SW 200 fixed or collapsible tube?

Your next time out, try viewing the rings of Saturn, and you also should be able to detect the Orion Nebula

Been in the Southern Hemisphere, have other deep sky objects to view as well

Not sure if where you are also able to observe Omega Centauri Global Cluster

I use APP called Heavens Above to assist with observing as well, and there are other star chart APPs available depending if you have an Android or Apple mobile phone

John

 

 

 

 

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HI, Viktiste, and welcome to SGL.

The 200P is a good scope and you have many more great "firsts" in store.

If you have the chance, do swing the scope round onto Saturn ... that will definitely blow your mind, despite the low altitude this year. Mars will also be worth a look, although the dust storm is hiding much of its surface at this time - and again the low altitude does not help.

Unfortunately, Omega Centauri is far too low to be visible from Norway, but there are many great sights in store as the year progresses and you start to get some real darkness again. A great resource for things to try is Turn Left at Orion (your internet will give you better access to Norwegian suppliers than mine).

Enjoy the journey.

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Excellent stuff. I remember my first time I saw craters and than jupiter and saturn through a telescope.. it was through a 60mm not a 200mm scope but I can still relate to your excitement.....

The best is still to come.

 

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Truly wonderful!  Next time you look, it's highly likely you'll see Io as well.  Many, many more wonders await you - have fun!

Doug.

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Welcome to SGL and congrats on that find! A 200mm Dob will show you a lot more moons, nebulae, galaxies and the rest. Have fun and keep sharing the observations!

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I agree with the others here. You will enjoy so many targets with the 200P. Its prob the best suited scope for UK skies, and a very capable instrument.

Grab yourself a decent star atlas and start planning the sessions!.

Clear Skies Rob

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I can relate to that post, it's only the past few months since I started viewing and seeing jupiter and its moons totally blew me away.. I even held the cat up to the eyepiece to show him!! 😀 

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Thanks for the comments folks 🙂  Apart from the wow feeling I got I guess I also start to realize how much time this hobby might take...

Saturn was behind a obstacle so i did not get a look at that. Was planning to look at Mars, but realized that was only appearing very late at night, so that will be for some other time...

@cletrac1922: It's a fixed tube - bought it 2nd hand but brand new with some cosmetic transport damage. Did a lot reading before I bought equipment, and as everyone advises I put most of the money in the mount -went for a HEQ5 from FLO. 

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Viktiste

Solar viewing

Located in the plastic lid, there is an detachable small hole cover

Get some Baader solar film, and sticky tape a small piece over the small hole, with small hole cover removed, and you are able to do solar viewing

Remember to leave your spotting scope off as well

Attached pic was taken during the 2012 solar eclipse, where I was we only had 80% eclipse, and taken with mobile phone to eyepiece

 

 

Solar Eclipse.jpg

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Posted (edited)

That has crossed my mind actually... Did not know that one of the two small hole cover came off (just had to go and check... and yes it does). Thanks for the tip. Guess it does not matter that it is off center? Baader film will be on order pretty soon.

Edited by Viktiste

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Welcome to the SGL.

I too suffer from the twilight issue here in NE Scotland, UK. My scope hibernates for the Summer?

That small 2" aperture cap also works just fine when observing the Moon?  having a smaller aperture, there's less light to virtually blind you. 
When you remove the cap, it stows over the immovable cap. so as not to lose it!

Enjoy  your future observations.

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Congratulations on your first observation of the Galilean moons, @Viktiste, hope you continue enjoying the sky in the future. Do not worry too much about the bright summers at our high latitudes. As you already noticed there is plenty that can be done in the twilight, as planetary observing (as you did), lunar and even observations of bright double and variable stars. As has been mentioned, the long days suit themselves very well for solar observing, clouds permitting. Good luck!

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Congratulations! Absolutely wonderful to catch a glimpse of the moons of another 'world'. Some moons of Saturn are well within reach of your scope too, although this planet doesn't rise very high from Norway these years.

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