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StarFiveSky

How bad is my situation (to get inton astronomy)?

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As you have a pair of binoculars then have a look at this site, and subscribe to the free monthly binocular observing list.

binocularsky link

 

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Welcome..

Well its dilemma situation here!.. Humm you maybe best looking at a strong photo tripod, that clearly folds down well. Hunt Ebay for a good deal. Once you have that options could be big bino's or a mak. This would mean the back pack could cope!. You will need a few eyepieces and a barlow also.

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On 13/07/2018 at 15:13, Rob said:

Welcome..

Well its dilemma situation here!.. Humm you maybe best looking at a strong photo tripod, that clearly folds down well. Hunt Ebay for a good deal. Once you have that options could be big bino's or a mak. This would mean the back pack could cope!. You will need a few eyepieces and a barlow also.

What about my location? Light pollution etc?

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Posted (edited)
On 13/07/2018 at 11:19, StarFiveSky said:

EDIT: How do people watch the night sky with their binoculars? Mine (20x50) don't seem to do much, (magnification is not that great). Maybe its my location, where's the nearest "dark spot" / best place to view the night sky? Location (with a bit of privacy ofc ;), who would post their exact pos. online??)

<-- Correct loc: Ennepetal, 58256 

Edited by StarFiveSky

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3 hours ago, StarFiveSky said:

What about my location? Light pollution etc?

If you go to this light pollution map for your area, you'll see you're in red/yellow area which means you won't be able to see the Milky Way, but you should be able to see many brighter stars and use them to locate star clusters and brighter nebula via star hopping.  You'll probably need a UHC or OIII nebula filter to bring out more detail in them once centered.  Notice that if you go south and east just a little ways, your sky conditions will improve quite a bit.

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5 hours ago, Louis D said:

If you go to this light pollution map for your area, you'll see you're in red/yellow area which means you won't be able to see the Milky Way, but you should be able to see many brighter stars and use them to locate star clusters and brighter nebula via star hopping.  You'll probably need a UHC or OIII nebula filter to bring out more detail in them once centered.  Notice that if you go south and east just a little ways, your sky conditions will improve quite a bit.

I see which area you mean, it's not far away and I could get there pretty easily.

Though in which area (light pollution color) do I need to be in order to watch the milky way or most of the sky?

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4 hours ago, StarFiveSky said:

I see which area you mean, it's not far away and I could get there pretty easily.

Though in which area (light pollution color) do I need to be in order to watch the milky way or most of the sky?

According to map, your location is mag 20.3 skies, that is quite good compared to some other red locations.

My location is around 18.5 (also red), so almost 2 magnitudes difference - that means that my sky is about 6 times brighter than yours.

Even at 18.5mag skies, I'm able to glimpse milky way sometimes (if sky is really transparent), only at zenith.

You should be able to do quite a bit of observing from your location (both planets and DSOs). Do a little reading on internet on how to optimize your observing experience (dark adaptation, best spots for observing, shielding from direct light sources, judging the sky conditions, ....) - and be aware that observing is a skill to be learned - to more you learn how to observe - more you will be able to see.

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Posted (edited)
On 16/07/2018 at 13:07, vlaiv said:

According to map, your location is mag 20.3 skies, that is quite good compared to some other red locations.

My location is around 18.5 (also red), so almost 2 magnitudes difference - that means that my sky is about 6 times brighter than yours.

Even at 18.5mag skies, I'm able to glimpse milky way sometimes (if sky is really transparent), only at zenith.

You should be able to do quite a bit of observing from your location (both planets and DSOs). Do a little reading on internet on how to optimize your observing experience (dark adaptation, best spots for observing, shielding from direct light sources, judging the sky conditions, ....) - and be aware that observing is a skill to be learned - to more you learn how to observe - more you will be able to see.

I read that even if you are in a dark area and look south + clear sky, moonless with no clouds, you could see a bunch of stars and perhaps other objects but you won't be able see the Great Rift of the milky way 😮

(Also read that: ) The rods in our eyes are not strong enough to collect the colors so we would just see it in gray tone colors. But why, we can see fainter and further object with binoculars anyway so the great rift shouldn't be that much harder to see and wouldn't it be possible to just buy a pair of "correction" glasses which make the colors more apparent to the human eye?

Quote

One thing you won't see in the Milky Way, either in binoculars or with the naked eye, is any color. Photographs register the reddish glow of hydrogen gas, but the light is too faint to trigger the color receptors in the human eye, so all you'll see are shades of gray. <- https://www.space.com/26901-milky-way-summer-observing-tips.html

PS: The 5" dob seems much more portable and it even fits into any classical backpack (the price dif. of 100€/$ is also interesting).

Edited by StarFiveSky

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Come to Australia!!

The Milky Way is very very impressive under  good conditions......believe me.....

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, Merlin66 said:

Come to Australia!!

The Milky Way is very very impressive under  good conditions......believe me.....

Too many schnakes in the outback😁.

-----------------------------------------------

(Too hot and too far away sry but one day we'll be playing on that Didjeridu oi mate👌.

Edited by StarFiveSky

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38 minutes ago, Stub Mandrel said:

It's not bad in Shropshire and amazing on Exmoor!

Have you been to Southburningtem (I have no clue how to spell the city's name) ?

Btw your Webseite (Astronomy subsite) is awesome but I found a few typos: just before the moon picture you wrote:

Quote

My scope, mount and tripod coast £180

Perhaps cost?

And 2ndly after the image: "A Conjunction of Moon and Venus" there's a small text field (one character fits in), why?

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51 minutes ago, StarFiveSky said:

Southburningtem (I have no clue how to spell the city's name) ?

South Burlington? But that's in the USA.

51 minutes ago, StarFiveSky said:

Perhaps cost?

Maybe 😉

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Posted (edited)

This thread is mostly completed though I have a question:

I always see a star (blue-ish through my binoculars) at around 12am - 01am, ascending from left and descending to right.

(I know without any coordinates and positioning etc its pretty much impossible to find it... but that's not the point atm).

2 Days ago I looked up at the sky, as usual,  from my window (worst view, 2 houses/buildings block my view 80%, though high up in the sky a few stars are visible) and saw that same star but it was blinking ?!

Imagine seeing a blue shiny dot in the sky, everyday going the same route, but all of a sudden in the middle of night you see it blinking / getting brighter and then darker for a few times (really fast) and then it gets pretty faint / dark.

 

The next night I saw a yellow-ish star in that same spot (exaxt same position) the blue one was in 2 days ago! 

I have seen yellow stars in the night sky (i think😁) but this one feels weirder,I don't know.

Its pretty bright, like you can't miss it when you look up (from my view/pos.)

 

Edited by StarFiveSky
typo and detailing

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On 18/07/2018 at 09:10, StarFiveSky said:

I read that even if you are in a dark area and look south + clear sky, moonless with no clouds, you could see a bunch of stars and perhaps other objects but you won't be able see the Great Rift of the milky way 😮

If you are talking about the Cygnus rift, I regularly see it when down in Dorset or Devon in the U.K., probably Mag 20.5 skies and it is very clear.

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57 minutes ago, Stu said:

If you are talking about the Cygnus rift, I regularly see it when down in Dorset or Devon in the U.K., probably Mag 20.5 skies and it is very clear.

Cygnus Rift = Great Rift. Can you show exactly how it looks like for you? I'd love to see it

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5 hours ago, StarFiveSky said:

This thread is mostly completed though I have a question:

I always see a star (blue-ish through my binoculars) at around 12am - 01am, ascending from left and descending to right.

(I know without any coordinates and positioning etc its pretty much impossible to find it... but that's not the point atm).

2 Days ago I looked up at the sky, as usual,  from my window (worst view, 2 houses/buildings block my view 80%, though high up in the sky a few stars are visible) and saw that same star but it was blinking ?!

Imagine seeing a blue shiny dot in the sky, everyday going the same route, but all of a sudden in the middle of night you see it blinking / getting brighter and then darker for a few times (really fast) and then it gets pretty faint / dark.

 

The next night I saw a yellow-ish star in that same spot (exaxt same position) the blue one was in 2 days ago! 

I have seen yellow stars in the night sky (i think😁) but this one feels weirder,I don't know.

Its pretty bright, like you can't miss it when you look up (from my view/pos.)

 

Perhaps you're looking at Albireo.  It's a blue/yellow double star system in Cygnus.  It could be that the binoculars aren't providing enough magnification for a clean split, so you're seeing one component or the other dominate in color.

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Posted (edited)
22 minutes ago, Louis D said:

Perhaps you're looking at Albireo.  It's a blue/yellow double star system in Cygnus.  It could be that the binoculars aren't providing enough magnification for a clean split, so you're seeing one component or the other dominate in color.

This is most likely what I saw, a binary star and a mixture of binoculars being misused ;). 

I had the theory that shining a strong flashlight through the binoculars would extend the range of the flashlight. Could this possibly damage the binoculars ? (Just wanna experiment around with optics ;) )

 

Edited by StarFiveSky

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1 hour ago, StarFiveSky said:

I had the theory that shining a strong flashlight through the binoculars would extend the range of the flashlight. Could this possibly damage the binoculars ? (Just wanna experiment around with optics ;) )

No, you won't damage anything trying this experiment.  What you're trying to achieve is a collimated beam.  I don't know how well it would work.  The reflector in most flashlights is an approximated parabola with the bulb filament at the focus.  Newer Cree LED type flashlights use what appears to be a focusable PCX (Plano-Convex) lens in front of the LED to collimate the beam.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Louis D said:

Perhaps you're looking at Albireo.  It's a blue/yellow double star system in Cygnus.  It could be that the binoculars aren't providing enough magnification for a clean split, so you're seeing one component or the other dominate in color.

I used an app and found out that the star I mentioned before is located in the middle /mid-bottom part of boötes:

According to wikipedia, boöetis is full of binary (dual?) stars which strengthens my assumption even more.932060489_07-20-18vorm.12-16-03.thumb.png.174d018b2098ebe987e4b7f2149ab8cc.png

Edited by StarFiveSky

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