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1st decent Saturn for two years and 1st light for the ADC


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Saturn along with all the outer planets has been a chore to image all year, due to the low altitude. I had a bit of a eureka moment the other evening though.

At the bottom of the garden is a gap between the nearby conifers and even nearer cherry tree. Its only around 20 degrees width of sky, good for an hour or so of imaging time, but more importantly its right where the Planets transit the Meridian.

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So last night I waited up for Saturn to appear in the gap (12:30) and there it was at a lofty 15 degrees, compared to 8 degrees in the other garden window.

1st capture was with my C9.25 and asi290mm using a 642 Proplanet filter.

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The next two captures were same scope, but using my OSC asi224mc camera. The 2nd is with a ADC for the 1st time as well.

The ADC image is clearly improved from the 1st. I simply popped the ADC in the Barlow, with the nylon thumb screw level to the horizon and adjusted the 2 knobs until the image on the screen looked better. The red/blue edges top and bottom disappeared very quickly to be honest.

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ADC fitted

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Not great images by any means, but certainly better than any of mine recently.

And definitely a spot to maybe catch the Mars opposition.

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I thought that the first colour image was with the ADC, until I spotted the second image! Mine look like your first one, that just shows you the difference it really does make. 

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Must have a big garden Pete if you only just found that niche! ;) The ADC certainly makes things better either visually or for imaging when lower down in the sky. I use mine quite extensively too. 

Edited by Knighty2112
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3 minutes ago, Aussie Dave said:

A nice result Pete. The ADC seems to be the goods. Do you RGB align in AutoStakkert or RegiStax?

I aligned in Registax 6 and processed there as well. Not sure this hot humid weather is helping much to be honest in terms of image quality.

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I think the main drawback is the elevation for everyone that far north Pete. I know what it's like when you want to do some planetary. The tides will eventually turn and we'll have the planets low in the sky, something I don't want to think about.

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I recently received the Zwo ADC (as the planets are going to be low for a couple of years), but have yet to try it out for imaging with the C9.25. I did have a quick go last night visually with my ST80, for practice adjusting it and I thought it made a big difference. I might try and get out tonight and give it a proper go after seeing your results.

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1 hour ago, Pete Presland said:

The next two captures were same scope, but using my OSC asi224mc camera. The 2nd is with a ADC for the 1st time as well.

The ADC image is clearly improved from the 1st. I simply popped the ADC in the Barlow, with the nylon thumb screw level to the horizon and adjusted the 2 knobs until the image on the screen looked better. The red/blue edges top and bottom disappeared very quickly to be honest.

Pete, a great report and example on what a difference the ADC makes. Glad you found that transit sky hole ?. Geof

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