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blurhit

blurry image with vivitar 60 x 700?

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Posted (edited)

So my dad knows how much I like astronomy and bought me a vivitar refractor telescope.

Though mars, the moon, jupiter etc all look like blurry images. I've tried all the lenses, watched a ton of tutorials, but all astros look like blurry stars with different colors.

any tips?

Edited by blurhit

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Posted (edited)

Is it this telescope?

 https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/757193-USA/Vivitar_VIV_TEL_60700_TEL_60700_Telescope.html

Focussing is not easy if the mount is unstable, and the mount on this telescope does look a little unstable.

Your best chance for a decent image is with the 12.5 mm eyepiece. That will give you 700/12.5 = 56 times magnification. A 60 mm telescope, if it is a good one, will handle magnifications of up to 120 times.

The 4 mm eyepiece will give 175 times. With the Barlow, the 12.5 mm eyepiece will give 168 times, and the 4 mm 525 times. These three magnifications are too much for the telescope. Too much magnification makes the images dim and blurry.

-

Here's a tip or two for getting a better experience:

Try weighting down the tripod to make it more stable. Hang a bucket with some sand or a few bricks or stones from the centre. Also use the telescope with the 12.5 mm eyepiece only. Learn to focus on distant landmarks and after that the Moon.

You will probably get brighter and sharper images with a lower power eyepiece like the 23mm svbony (the 23 mm vite is the same). It's not bad at all. Neither is it expensive. It will give you a magnification of about 30 times. It's this one: 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Top-SVBONY-23mm-Lens-Wide-Angle-62-Aspheric-Eyepiece-for-1-25-31-7mm-Telescopes/131891183264?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D44039%26meid%3D88f23e2eb23f47f4a0462694034b079d%26pid%3D100011%26rk%3D6%26rkt%3D12%26sd%3D131891173575%26itm%3D131891183264&_trksid=p2047675.c100011.m1850

 

 

Edited by Ruud
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You might be able to see the moons around Jupiter with that scope, but not sure if you will be able to see details on the planet itself.

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Unfortunately it may be that your kit is not at fault but rather that you are experiencing the effects of atmospheric seeing during your viewing. Our turbulent atmosphere can cause the effects you are describing. However, you should be able to get good views of the Moon despite this. Ensure you have carefully adjusted the Focuser for the best view and use a low power eyepiece as suggested above.

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Try focusing it on terrestrial targets during the day using just the diagonal and longest eyepiece. If you can get focus on objects in the distance then that position will not be far from where you need the focuser at night. Closer object will require the focuser to be moved outwards. You can also use this time to align your finderscope so that at night you know you are definitely pointing the scope at the right thing.

When using it at night remember that the focuser is a focuser and not a zoom. The point of best focus will be when things are smallest. Try to observe things when they are at their highest in the sky to reduce atmospheric effects. You also need to be outside, and if possible you should observe from and view over areas of vegetation rather than man made structures which will retain heat and cause thermals longer into the night.

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18 hours ago, Ruud said:

Is it this telescope?

 https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/757193-USA/Vivitar_VIV_TEL_60700_TEL_60700_Telescope.html

Focussing is not easy if the mount is unstable, and the mount on this telescope does look a little unstable.

Your best chance for a decent image is with the 12.5 mm eyepiece. That will give you 700/12.5 = 56 times magnification. A 60 mm telescope, if it is a good one, will handle magnifications of up to 120 times.

The 4 mm eyepiece will give 175 times. With the Barlow, the 12.5 mm eyepiece will give 168 times, and the 4 mm 525 times. These three magnifications are too much for the telescope. Too much magnification makes the images dim and blurry.

-

Here's a tip or two for getting a better experience:

Try weighting down the tripod to make it more stable. Hang a bucket with some sand or a few bricks or stones from the centre. Also use the telescope with the 12.5 mm eyepiece only. Learn to focus on distant landmarks and after that the Moon.

You will probably get brighter and sharper images with a lower power eyepiece like the 23mm svbony (the 23 mm vite is the same). It's not bad at all. Neither is it expensive. It will give you a magnification of about 30 times. It's this one: 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Top-SVBONY-23mm-Lens-Wide-Angle-62-Aspheric-Eyepiece-for-1-25-31-7mm-Telescopes/131891183264?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D44039%26meid%3D88f23e2eb23f47f4a0462694034b079d%26pid%3D100011%26rk%3D6%26rkt%3D12%26sd%3D131891173575%26itm%3D131891183264&_trksid=p2047675.c100011.m1850

 

 

Yes that is the telescope.

Thank you all for all your tips. I am really trying to learn and highly appreciate this, and hopefully will be able to enjoy stargazing with dad. I'll give all your tips a go today, and will provide feedback.

 Any help is accepted.

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