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MarsG76

Mars Dust STORM!!!!!!!!!!! 10 June 2018

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Hello again astronomers,

Looking forward to the opposition of Mars in a bit over a month from now, the one thing that has me a bit concerned is the developing dust storm on Mars, so naturally I'm keeping an eye on it and hoping, hoping hard for it to settle down...

I seen a photo today showing that the whole Mars globe is dusted out, but photos like this have turned up previously, such as on the same day I took the below picture and showed a hazed out dust ball, but obviously that was not the case, although there is definitely a dust storm developing as shown in the actual pic and "Mars Globe" simulation image.

Let's hope the Mars Clears up by August... this year.

 

Mars 10Jun18.JPG

Mars Globe  compare.JPG

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31 minutes ago, Demonperformer said:

Fingers, toes & everything else crossed! 

Yes, definitely

 

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I managed to spot some surface features plus hints of the polar cap with my 70mm refractor last night so there is still hope of some decent views this opposition :smiley:

The disk was quite crisply defined at 150x.

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4 minutes ago, John said:

I managed to spot some surface features plus hints of the polar cap with my 70mm refractor last night so there is still hope of some decent views this opposition :smiley:

The disk was quite crisply defined at 150x.

Of course, there's always hope.

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5 minutes ago, MarsG76 said:

Although the weblink address suggests the dust storm might have covered the whole planet, the article says it hasn't (just that's encircling part).

The BAA Mars Section runs a narrative on what observers are seeing

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9 minutes ago, celestron8g8 said:

Best place to keep up with true updates on Mars is from NASA where they get reports from both Rovers that are actually on Mars at this moment . 

https://mars.nasa.gov/news/8348/opportunity-hunkers-down-during-dust-storm/

They will show what is happening around each rover but won't give an overall view or indication of what we might see from Earth.

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21 minutes ago, Stu said:

They will show what is happening around each rover but won't give an overall view or indication of what we might see from Earth.

You’re absolutely right Stu

Seems that NASA is thinking the current dust storm maybe the beginning of a global one. But this would be unprecedentedly early in the Martian season (based on Earth based obs from the last 100 years), thus other folks think it will die down before the real event later in the season.

What will actually happen only time will tell 

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19 minutes ago, JeremyS said:

You’re absolutely right Stu

Seems that NASA is thinking the current dust storm maybe the beginning of a global one. But this would be unprecedentedly early in the Martian season (based on Earth based obs from the last 100 years), thus other folks think it will die down before the real event later in the season.

What will actually happen only time will tell 

I do hope so Jeremy. Will be interesting to see the latest sketches or images in to see what they show.

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Personally I hope so also , cause i'm hoping to do some viewing and maybe imaging again before I finally pull the plug . But with NASA having Rovers producing images and the Hubble I have no way to know what is actually happening now other than what they produce and latest images of Mars . Those can be found not only here but at www.spaceweather.com  . This image in their gallery is June 20th and shows a decent Mars but wondering if focus is a factor or is it dust on Mars ? http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=145363&PHPSESSID=m6746hikank4k8oda4de8fas03

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47 minutes ago, celestron8g8 said:

I have no way to know what is actually happening now other than what they produce and latest images of Mars

I think the Spaceweather link, and the BAA Mars section are probably as good as any for working out what is going on. From the rover images you will just think the whole planet is covered, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

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30 minutes ago, Stu said:

I think the Spaceweather link, and the BAA Mars section are probably as good as any for working out what is going on. From the rover images you will just think the whole planet is covered, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

There use to be alot of amateur astronomers in the USA that took good images but i rarely see sny post now so i think here imaging is coming to a real slow down and i think mainly it’s due to large amounts of LP growing across the USA ! I use to be on another forum some years back but it got closed down for lack of financial reasons . The LP is increasing here where i live which is one reason it discourages me also . Can’t get ppl to turn off back porch lights cause they all think they need light to see :( . But how i wish i were 20 yrs younger in better shape cause i would be out almost every night of clear skies ! But things change with no choice . Otherwise i think there would be alot of new pictures to be seen . I been searching the web for recent images of Mars but other than here I’m not finding any other than NASA  or Spaceweather where anyone is posting anything including other DSOs’ . What other sources do you use than can be good evidence of Mars status ?? 

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7 minutes ago, celestron8g8 said:

There use to be alot of amateur astronomers in the USA that took good images but i rarely see sny post now so i think here imaging is coming to a real slow down and i think mainly it’s due to large amounts of LP growing across the USA ! I use to be on another forum some years back but it got closed down for lack of financial reasons . The LP is increasing here where i live which is one reason it discourages me also . Can’t get ppl to turn off back porch lights cause they all think they need light to see :( . But how i wish i were 20 yrs younger in better shape cause i would be out almost every night of clear skies ! But things change with no choice . Otherwise i think there would be alot of new pictures to be seen . I been searching the web for recent images of Mars but other than here I’m not finding any other than NASA  or Spaceweather where anyone is posting anything including other DSOs’ . What other sources do you use than can be good evidence of Mars status ?? 

In general LP shouldn't interfere with planetary imaging as the planets are bright enough to cut through it. This part of the forum is where you would find any images and there do seem to be quite a few Mars images in here

https://stargazerslounge.com/forum/36-imaging-planetary/

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13 minutes ago, Stu said:

In general LP shouldn't interfere with planetary imaging as the planets are bright enough to cut through it. This part of the forum is where you would find any images and there do seem to be quite a few Mars images in here

https://stargazerslounge.com/forum/36-imaging-planetary/

Yeah i been checking it out but i was hoping there is a Pro website like NASA that gives more updates on Mars status . 

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3 minutes ago, celestron8g8 said:

Yeah i been checking it out but i was hoping there is a Pro website like NASA that gives more updates on Mars status . 

Much of the global monitoring of the planets is down to we amateur astronomers. We have a real role to play as shown by organisations such as the British Astronomical Association and ALPO. There’s probably never been a more  Exciting time to be an amateur astronomer!

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There are images on CloudyNights, the earliest on the 31st May, and also on Ice In Space.  ?

Angie

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10 hours ago, JeremyS said:

other folks think it will die down before the real event

I'm one of them... but yes, only time will tell.

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7 hours ago, celestron8g8 said:

There use to be alot of amateur astronomers in the USA that took good images but i rarely see sny post now so i think here imaging is coming to a real slow down and i think mainly it’s due to large amounts of LP growing across the USA ! I use to be on another forum some years back but it got closed down for lack of financial reasons . The LP is increasing here where i live which is one reason it discourages me also . Can’t get ppl to turn off back porch lights cause they all think they need light to see :( . But how i wish i were 20 yrs younger in better shape cause i would be out almost every night of clear skies ! But things change with no choice . Otherwise i think there would be alot of new pictures to be seen . I been searching the web for recent images of Mars but other than here I’m not finding any other than NASA  or Spaceweather where anyone is posting anything including other DSOs’ . What other sources do you use than can be good evidence of Mars status ?? 

Light pollution won't interfere with planetary observation or imaging, they're bright enough to punch through the LP... especially Mars, and Jupiter and Saturn for that matter.

I think the lack of images is a combination of Mars being a hard target and that a lot of amateurs are holding out for July and August, best chance of real nice detail.

I'd say only a small amount of imagers are avoiding Mars due to the dust storm.

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7 hours ago, JeremyS said:

Exciting time to be an amateur astronomer!

That it is indeed.

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