Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

alanjgreen

9 June - Night Vision helps the Borg blow the Sharpless catalogue wide open!

Recommended Posts

Date: Sat 9th June 0020-0215       

Scope: Borg 89ED f6.7 (fl 600mm) on SkyTee-2.   Night Vision: PVS-14 with Photonis 4g INTENS.

Eyepieces: 55mm (f3.2 x11), 35mm (f5 x17)

Filters: Astronomik 6nm Ha CCD.

Introduction

We are now into June and up here in Penrith that means no darkness and about an hour of “deep dusk” before the sky brightens once again from 2am onwards. To the North the sky never goes dark at all. This creates about a 2-hour observing slot where at least I can see the main constellation stars to enable me to use the red dot finder to align the scope to something in the sky.

 

Start Low…

I had the 55mm Plossl and 6nm Ha CCD filter loaded together with my PVS-14 Night Vision Device (NVD) attached to the eyepiece with the TNVC/Televue afocal astronomy adapter. This turns my Borg into an f3.2 scope with a magnification of x11. The NVD provides a 40 degree field of view (fov).

I’ve had three sessions on Sagittarius since late May and last night after an initial alignment on Antares and a pan around the low summer targets (Lagoon, Triffid, Swan, Eagle) revealing that wet sky conditions low down were rendering the view inferior to previous sessions, we had had heavy rain around 4pm and the sky still remained in a wet state.

 

…Then Aim High!

I decided to re-align to a new target area of the Milky Way around Cygnus (higher in the sky).

I used the red dot finder to align to Deneb and started to move down using the SkyTee-2 slow-mo controls until I found the North American nebula which was bright and showing its whole structure. It was just slightly bigger that the fov of the eyepiece so I had to use the manual controls to investigate. I discovered a whole wispy section moving off the north side of the nebula that I did not know was there.

Having spent many years looking at these targets with much larger scopes, it’s hard to really comprehend how easily they are seen with tiny aperture when you add Night Vision and a decent Ha CCD filter into the equation.

Sitting to the left of the North American was the Pelican, the vertical streak of its “beak” was clearly visible alongside two other straight sections, and it looked like an “F” rotated at 45 degrees to the right. There was plenty more nebulosity on view but this basic “F” shape kept catching my eye. At the edge of the fov I could see a curvy section just off to the left of the Pelican (IC 5068) and centred it to observe it. IC 5068 appeared brighter than the Pelican and seemed to make the shape of an “opened palm of a hand that was holding the Pelican in place in the sky” :)

Next, I opened the clutches of the SkyTee-2 and changed to “nudging” the scope by hand to see what other shapes I could “discover”...

Below the North American, I bumped into a “backward C shaped nebula” (near 68 Cyg) which was almost large enough to fill the fov (Sh2-119). This nebula was less clear than the others observed so far but still easy to see.

I headed back to Deneb to start a pass into Cygnus. As I found Deneb, I immediately noticed three spread out patches of nebulosity, two were small and circular while the third was a longer streak of nebula (Sh2-115 & Sh2-112). I panned right into Cygnus. Wow, there is just so much nebula! I ended up doing a “grid sweep” style manoeuvre with the scope as I panned and stepped my way down through the Cygnus region. The star attraction was the thick black lane section around Sadr which was bright and beautiful. But there was so much more nebulosity than “just this Sadr bit!” The clouds of shape was varying in brightness and density and the size of the area covered was HUGE. Sh2-108 stood out brightly.

At one point I happened upon the Crescent nebula, it was pretty small but bright and showing the full curve (at x11) around three bright stars.

Now it was time to head left over to the Elephant Trunk and Sh2-131. I returned to the North American nebula first then used this to get my height correct as I panned left and eventually straight into the sh2-131 nebula. It appeared as a large fuzzy “brain” to fill the whole fov. The centre section was much harder to see and appeared as a “dark hole within the surrounding fuzz”. I could see several black lanes coming and going within the nebulosity and used the nearby Garnet star to try to orientate myself with Sky Safari. I do not believe that I saw the Elephant trunk within the nebula but there was plenty of darker “black bits” at other locations within sh2-131 (using a mirror diagonal was also adding confusion to my brain! [I hope to get it later in the season when I get the 20” mirror and NVD onto this target]

I panned up from sh2-131 looking for Sh2-129 (Bat wing nebula). It was easily located but was pretty faint compared to some of the other nebula that I had picked out so far.

I panned down from IC1396 and located Sh2-132 which appeared as a bright patch of nebulosity.

A quick look at Sky Safari revealed that the Cave was nearby so I used Sh2-132 as a marker to pan left over to the Cave (sh2-155) and soon bumped into it. I have never seen the Cave region with such low magnification before so the view was hard to recognise! The nebula was a nice size within the fov but there was so much nebulosity that I found it hard to see “just the usual bright bit”. There was a “clear dark side” to the nebula but the nebulosity’s appearance was more of a “cloud” or “cauliflower”. I tried switching to the 35mm for more magnification but the loss of focal ratio caused some of the brightness to be lost.

By now, it was starting to get light and the sky was brightening, I decided to head for the Bubble nebula. I can only imagine how tiny it must be at x11 as I never managed to locate it!

It was time to pack up. I returned to my eye piece box to discover standing water on top, the dew was really bad!

 

Sky Safari Flight Path

Here are some screenshots from Sky Safari with my observing list highlighted

3.jpg.7885642d43750e3dc80cff8f1ff1f401.jpg

2.jpg.f212a4e702e550bd5bcf30ba5e2fb745.jpg

1.jpg.590e5254076fcd1111ad9dd95994948e.jpg

 

Conclusions

Writing this report has been a discovery in Sharpless objects! Most of those mentioned in the report are new to me and I have had to spend time using the internet just to find the names for the objects that I observed.

It is clear that there must be very few nebula beyond the reach of NV (if they have a Ha component that is) and I am looking forward to getting my big dob onto some of these tiny faint Sharpless objects (for some increased NV magnification).

However, it seems Sky Safari do not expect anyone to see these objects as it’s been a real pain to find the names this morning. Looks like I need to “search” for each Sharpless in turn and add them to an observing list to get Sky Safari to show them, a job for the next rainy day.

 

Clear Skies,

Alan

Edited by alanjgreen
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice report Alan, getting some great results despite the light nights!

I don’t think this totally solves your problem but may help.

If you do a search for Sharpless in SkySafari then it shows (on my version) 228 objects. You can then turn this into an observing list. If you then go to observing lists and select the one you’ve just created, you have the option to highlight those objects which will show all the Sharpless objects in the catalogue held by SS. It seems some that you viewed are missing but at least it shows all that are available. Might be useful.

AF9ADE5F-7D76-4BAA-988B-5288D06A7708.png

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great report, when I grow up I want night vision! :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great report Alan, you getting the most out of these grey nights with the help of your NV.

Nice objects.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great report, Alan. I bet you never imagined you’d be working your way through Sharpless objects with the Borg while the big dob sat in the shed!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Littleguy80 said:

Great report, Alan. I bet you never imagined you’d be working your way through Sharpless objects with the Borg while the big dob sat in the shed!

Ha Ha Ha, you're right :) 

Still Big Dobs chance will come once the Milky Way swings around a bit more to be better placed from the shed.

Main thing is that (1) cooling is no problem with the Borg and (2) I can get down to the southern horizon easily too, for instance last night I managed to pick off M6 for the first time with night vision, it was small but clearly a Butterfly! M7 was stuck low behind my shed so probably need another month before it clears it to pick that off.

Shows that one scope is never enough...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, alanjgreen said:

Ha Ha Ha, you're right :) 

Still Big Dobs chance will come once the Milky Way swings around a bit more to be better placed from the shed.

Main thing is that (1) cooling is no problem with the Borg and (2) I can get down to the southern horizon easily too, for instance last night I managed to pick off M6 for the first time with night vision, it was small but clearly a Butterfly! M7 was stuck low behind my shed so probably need another month before it clears it to pick that off.

Shows that one scope is never enough...

Nice one. Good points. It was definitely easier to get lower down with my old scope on the tripod compared to the dob. I’m still hoping I can get M6/M7 in the dob though.

I read a really interesting article recently that put forward the idea of one eyepiece and multiple scopes. Change the scale but keep the exit pupil the same. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ask Santa for a copy of.... 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Astrophotography-Sky-Atlas-Charles-Bracken/dp/1517687802

the NV users skychart (apart from the reflection nebulae). Cygnus has too much nebulapus fluff in. Pity you didn’t get across to ngc7822 /ced 214 in Cepheus, rarely ever mentioned even by imagers.

cool stuff, seems like you’re a convert now!

PEter

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By alanjgreen
      Equipment Used:
      Scope: 20” f3.6 Lukehurst Dob with Paracorr (fl = 2089mm & f4.1).
      Night Vision: PVS-14 with Photonis 4g INTENS.
      Eyepiece: Plossl 55mm (f2 x38).
       
      Background.
      In spring 2019 I created a Sky Safari observing list of 214 highest brightness galaxies in the night sky above.
      I have observed 134 of the 214 (the others have not been well placed over my garden when I have been outside).
      In my first pass through these 134 galaxies, they were graded 0-3 (where 3 means "clear spiral arms" and 0 means "nothing to see here!")
      I have now completed a second pass through the grade 2 and grade 3 galaxies. This has resulted in some movement between bands based on my now greater experience and having a better idea of what I expect to see.
      My latest graded lists contain 38 grade 3 galaxies and 30 grade 2 galaxies (when combined this gives a list of the best galaxies to view when using military night vision technology combined with a low power eyepiece (using the TeleVue PVS-14 adapter).
      [Note that lower power eyepieces give the best spiral arm results as they “increase the effective focal ratio” of the telescope/night vision system which really helps increase the detail seen at the eyepiece.]
      As we are still in galaxy season 2020, now seemed a good time to re-publish my findings so others have the opportunity to observe some of these fantastic galaxies before they become “unavailable” for another 10 months…
       
      Grade 3 galaxies (the best of the best).
      M51 M61 M64 M65 M66 M81 M90 M91 M94 M95 M96 M99 M100 M101 M106 M109 NGC891 NGC2403 NGC2903 NGC3184 NGC3628 NGC3631 NGC3726 NGC3893 NGC3953 NGC4051 NGC4216 NGC4274 NGC4449 NGC4559 NGC4565 NGC4618 NGC4725 NGC5248 NGC5371 NGC5746 NGC5907 NGC6946  
      Grade 2 galaxies (good but the arms are not quite there…)
      M82 M88 M98 M104 NGC2537 NGC2768 NGC3294 NGC3344 NGC3373 NGC3596 NGC3646 NGC3675 NGC3718 NGC3729 NGC3813 NGC3938 NGC4013 NGC4214 NGC4293 NGC4389 NGC4490 NGC4517 NGC4535 NGC4625 NGC4762 NGC5005 NGC5364 NGC5383 NGC5775 NGC6015 Hopefully someone will find this useful information, next time they plan a galaxy observing session...
      Note that my dobsonian uses an Astrodevices Nexus unit which I control using Sky Safari. Here are my exported observing lists (which you can import into your Sky Safari app should you wish to do so?)
      Grade 3 Galaxies.skylist
      Grade 2 Galaxies.skylist
      1. email them to your phone/ipad,
      2. read the email on your mobile device and after clicking on the attachment, you should be offered the chance to “send to Sky Safari” by your email app…
      3.Sky Safari will open and give a message “Observing List Created”.
       
      Clear Skies,
      Alan
       
    • By alanjgreen
      Date: Friday 20th March 2020. 2300-0305hrs.
      Scope: 20” f3.6 Lukehurst Dob with Paracorr (fl = 2089mm & f4.1).
      Night Vision: PVS-14 with Photonis 4g INTENS.
      Eyepieces: Panoptic 27mm (f4 x77), DeLite 18.2mm (f5.8 x115).
       
      Introduction.
      Unbelievably, I just completed my third straight night outside observing Hickson Galaxy Groups and Supernovae. After months of thin gruel, I am beside myself although a little tired it must be said!
      Conditions last night were the best so far and my results improved as a result...
       
      Hicksons (3 new to me).
      I spent yesterday making an updated Sky Safari observing list. My aim was to edit the “full Hickson observing list”, remove all those that I have observed to produce a “To Do Hickson” observing list. I will add the steps taken to do this at the bottom of this report in case anyone is wondering how this is done?
      Hickson 54 – Sky Safari lists this as having one member IC700. I centred the target in the 27mm Eyepiece (with Night Vision device attached) and immediately saw a long thin edge-on galaxy patch. This thin line is in-fact made of 4 galaxies but I was unable to split the line on this occasion. Hickson 50 – (“The faintest Hickson” according to what I have read while doing research the last couple of days). It is also not present in Sky Safari when you search for “Hickson”! I used galaxy “PGC 2485269” to locate the correct area of sky to search for Hickson 50. As I look into the eyepiece a tiny double patch caught my eye straight away! With time, I got glimpses of a third patch to the right of the first two. I knew that I was looking for a pentagon shape of galaxies and there seemed to be a general faint glow in the area where all these galaxies are hiding. I waited but none of the others came into view.😀 Hickson 62 – Sky Safari has a major fail for several of the Hickson catalogue in that it shows them as having too many members (20+) in some cases. I nudged around the oversized Sky Safari search area and came upon a patch of three tiny galaxies, checking my Ipad Sky Safari showed NGC4761, NGC4759, NGC4764 and some research this morning confirms these findings.😀 I came upon a great website detailing the Hickson galaxy group members:
      https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.deepsky-visuell.de/Projekte/HCG34_66.htm&prev=search
      This information is really useful and I thank the author for publishing this data for me to find!😀
       
      Supernovae (6 from 7 attempted).
      Okay, onto the main diet for the evening…
      IC738/SN2020vg - SUCCESS. Repeating my observation from the previous night, the galaxy was once again tough to find. Once you have it then the elongated core can be seen within with the 18.2mm eyepiece. Images don't show a split so I am marking this one as a success.  PGC 041887/SN2020cdm – SUCCESS. I located the galaxy successfully in the 35mm, 27mm and 18.2mm eyepieces. It is located to the right of a small, mid-brightness “Xmas tree” star formation. A small patch is easily seen. Then it’s a case of letting the patch drift across the fov many times and watch for activity within using averted vision. With the 18.2mm eyepiece I was able to get 3 of 4 glimpses of a dot within the galaxy patch. NGC5371/SN2020bio – FAIL. I spent a long time on this large side-on galaxy but there was no sign of the Supernova in any eyepiece. I even tried an Ethos 10mm (conventional eyeball viewing) for greater magnification but the SN was not seen. I now doubt my observation from 18 March too. UGC9945/SN2019zhs – SUCCESS. With the 27mm eyepiece I quickly found the galaxy and could see the core within. Using the 18.2mm eyepiece I got occasional glimpses of two dots within the galaxy disk. PGC056547/SN2020dxa – SUCCESS. This is an easy target and it was nice after the work I had to put in on some of the previous ones! With the 18.2mm two dots within a dust patch are easily seen. UGC10661/SN2020awa – SUCCESS. The galaxy sits within a small triangle of stars (one corner of the triangle has 2 stars). With the 18.2mm eyepiece I could make out a dot within. PGC062161/SN2020duu – SUCCESS. This is another fairly easy one. It took a bit of time to find the edge-on galaxy. But once you have it there is a clear dot on the leading edge as it drifts across the fov.  
      Conclusions.
      After having two nights of not much sleep, I needed to pace myself last night. I delayed going out until 2300hrs so as to be able to stay out later without getting tired too soon. I am pleased to say that it was also warmer last night than the previous two nights (when I had to wipe of ice from the scope before packing away for the night).
      Perseverance is key with supernovae, you need to try them a few times to get the “lay of the land”. It’s amazing how you become familiar with the star patterns in the fov of the supernova’s parent galaxy. It’s like visiting an old friend by the third night. But it takes patience and concentration to get the faintest targets to pop into view and I was pretty tired by the time I packed up just after 3am.
       
      Clear Skies,
      Alan
       
      How to edit a Sky Safari observing list using Ipad & PC.
      Search for “Hickson” in Sky Safari Scroll to bottom of list and choose “create observing list” Use search to open the new observing list and scroll down to the bottom and choose “email observing list” On your PC, save the email attachment to desktop and add “.txt” to the end of the filename Edit the file with Notepad. Remove unwanted objects and save the file Remove “.txt” from the filename and email the file back to your Ipad On the Ipad, choose the email attachment and then choose “Sky Safari” when it asks what app you want to open the attachment with...
    • By alanjgreen
      Date: Sunday 1st March 2020. (2240-0220am)
      Scope: 20” f3.6 Lukehurst Dob with Paracorr (fl = 2089mm & f4.1).
      Night Vision: PVS-14 with Photonis 4g INTENS.
      Eyepieces: Plossl 55mm (f2 x38), Panoptic 35mm (f3 x60), Panoptic 27mm (f4 x77), DeLite 18.2mm (f5.8 x115).
      Filters: Baader 610nm Red Filter
      Moon: 39%
       
      Introduction.
      Wow, it’s already March and I’ve just completed my first real session of any note in 2020! The weather in the UK has been pants since Christmas. I have managed a couple of two hour dashes between the clouds but that is not enough time to really get into a session and do any real observing on any more than a few objects so I have mainly been observing the more famous and brightest night sky objects.
       
      Galaxy season is here!
      Yay, my favourite observing season is here. With all this down time, I at least had an observing plan to follow when the opportunity finally came. I had created observing lists in Sky Safari of the Hickson and ARP catalogs.
       
      Making a start on the Hickson catalog with Night Vision.
      There was a 39% moon in the West so I had to deploy a Baader 610nm Red filter to the front of my Paracorr2 to remove the unwanted moonlight from my view.
      On the first object, I tested out all the eyepieces listed above to see which produced the “best” view. There is a trade-off with night vision devices of image brightness and image magnification and I wanted to identify the best eyepiece option up-front as I intended to attach my eyepiece heater tape and then stick with the one eyepiece for the session.
      I settled on the Panoptic 35mm as my chosen eyepiece as it was giving decent image brightness resulting in more galaxy halo and the magnification (x60) was enough to provide something to see from these tiny objects.
       
      Hickson 37 – I could see three galaxies in a row close to two field stars. One galaxy was a longer edge-on and one had a bright core with faint halo. I found the fourth group member nearby just the other side of a field star although this one was a challenge to hold in vision for long. The final galaxy was glimpses occasionally with a real effort and concentration needed.
      Hickson 44 – Two small bright galaxies were immediately obvious, I soon located a third slightly separated galaxy of mid-brightness out in front. The final galaxy was the faintest of the four and was sited at 90 degrees to the side. All four galaxies were easily seen in direct vision.
      Hickson 46 – This group was hard to locate initially then I spotted two cores appearing close together in the field of view. After letting my eye settle in the other two galaxies appeared one on either side of the first two.
      Hickson 47 – Two cores were immediately obvious in the fov then one more emerged lower (near a field star). I did get glimpses of the fourth member which was in close to the third galaxy staggered to one side.
      Hickson 38 – Another group that was tough to find. Found just above left of two bright stars. Time reveals three galaxies in a triangle formation. The lower galaxy was the easiest with a nice halo. The upper two were smaller and fainter.
      Hickson 36 – The toughest so far! I found a possible very faint patch just below 6 stars. It looked like two groups of three galaxies but looking at images this morning then this looks incorrect so this goes down as a fail.
      Hickson 35 – Found inside a triangle of field stars. Three galaxies easily seen in a flat triangle formation. There was a possible fourth galaxy glimpsed to the left which was fainter.
      Hickson 41 – Two galaxies easily seen (one has a core and halo). The third was tough and appeared just under the fainter of the first two. No sign of the fourth member.
      Hickson 60 – A small patch is easily seen in the fov. One core dot is seen within the patch off–centre.
      Hickson 56 – This tiny group is located next to two much larger and brighter galaxies (NGC 3718, 3729) that overpower your vision as you reach the eyepiece. Once I was settled on my actual target then I saw two tiny bright galaxies first. Then the third was seen slightly separated to the RHS. Then one appeared LHS fainter giving a 3+1 appearance to the group.
      Hickson 55 – The small patch was quickly located in the fov. I could see two dot cores appearing on and off within the patch but not much more.
      Hickson 49 – not found.
      Hickson 61 (Box Galaxies) – A nice sight. Three bright galaxies make up three corners of the “box”. A fainter larger galaxy sits at the other corner. The two brightest galaxies were at the top side. The bright lower galaxy has a halo.
      Hickson 51 – Five galaxies are easily seen in the fov, appearing as 3+2. The galaxies appeared well spaced but were small.
      Hickson 57 (Copeland Septet) – A very nice galaxy group! I could see 7 galaxies appearing as 3+3+1 formation. All easily seen.
      Hickson 53 – I saw three galaxies in the fov in a 1+2 formation. The fourth member (off to the right) was not seen.
      Hickson 52 – Two galaxies were easily seen. Another galaxy is glimpsed intermittently near to the second galaxy with time at the eyepiece.
      Hickson 59 – 3 of 5 galaxies seen. Two are bright and easily seen. The third appeared at a right angle to the first two with the gain turned up.
      Hickson 58 – Four galaxies are easily seen in a 2+2 formation. The fifth needed further exploration but clouds starting passing and my session was cut off in its prime!
       
      Epilogue
      I make that 18 Hicksons attempted last night which seems like a good start and I am pleased with that.
      Most of the observations were taken with the Moon up so it will be interesting to try them again on a new moon to see if more can be seen…
      It was great to be back outside after nearly two months of slim pickings!
       
      Clear Skies,
      Alan
       
       
      Some Technical Background (Voluntary reading!).
      This section is added for anyone wondering why I was only using x60 magnification with my setup and maybe “more would be seen with greater magnification?”.
      While that would be true with traditional observing, night vision is best used with eyepieces with large exit pupils as the more light you get into the device then the more light it has to work with. Longer focal length eyepieces (greater than 27mm) also have a side-effect of increasing the effective focal ratio of your telescope system (as far as the attached night vision device is concerned) and as the NVD works at f1.2 then the closer we can get to that speed the better the results will be.
      So the facts are that the 55mm Plossl with always show the brightest view possible with the most galaxy details possible seen within that view.
      But when tiny objects are tightly packed then you may need more magnification to separate them (this is usually true for supernovae hunting for example).
      But as you increase magnification and decrease the exit pupil/effective focal ratio of the system then galaxy detail will be lost from the view. I only ever view galaxies where I hope to see the spiral arms with the 55mm Plossl as I want maximum brightness and fastest effective focal ratio.
    • By alanjgreen
      Date: Wednesday 18th March 2020. 2200-0240am
      Scope: 20” f3.6 Lukehurst Dob with Paracorr (fl = 2089mm & f4.1).
      Night Vision: PVS-14 with Photonis 4g INTENS.
      Eyepieces: Plossl 55mm (f2 x38), Panoptic 35mm (f3 x60), Panoptic 27mm (f4 x77), DeLite 18.2mm (f5.8 x115).
       
      Introduction.
      This is turning out to be a poor year for observing. It’s been another two weeks of cloud or full moon blocking me from getting outside for the last 17 nights!
      The good news is that a clear spell has landed over the UK and new moon is approaching...
      Last night I was out for four hours and had drawn up an observing plan of 12 current supernovae and also had my Hickson galaxy group observing list to continue working on.
       
      Supernovae (2 from 4).
      Unfortunately conditions were not perfect and visibility was not good to the low down south where a number of supernovae targets are located. But I attempted the targets that were well placed and available to me…
      NGC 3395/SN ASASSN-19aea – With the 18.2mm DeLite it was easy to find the two interacting galaxies. One galaxy was clearly larger and had a faint curved appearance where the arms were partially visible. There are 3 faint stars close-by for orientation and the galaxy next to the single star is the one with the SN. This larger galaxy definitely had a bright core which was elongated but I could not split the SN from the core. I tried the 27mm Panoptic (for increased brightness with the night vision device) and the field stars were easier to see but I could still not split the core & SN. FAIL. NGC 5371/SN2020bio – My first attempt before midnight was a fail. The galaxy was easily seen in the 27mm eyepiece and its large too. I matched field stars to my view for orientation but there was no sign of the SN.  I revisited this galaxy after 1am and this time the view was improved and I did get glimpses of a faint dot coming and going (mainly going) in the location of the SN! SUCCESS. 😀 PGC 056547/SN2020dxa – This one was easy to find and see! With the 27mm eyepiece you can see two dots (clearly separated) within the tiny galaxy patch. There is a double star above pointing the way to the galaxy and (unfortunately) there is a bright field star LHS causing reflections in the fov! SUCCESS. 😀 UGC 10661/SN2020awa – This galaxy is hard to find. It sits in a small field star triangle (one corner of the triangle has two stars, the other corners are single stars). I tried both 18.2mm and 27mm eyepieces but I could not split the SN from the galaxy core. FAIL.  
      Hicksons (7 new to me).
      Hickson 68 – With the 55mm eyepiece, I could easily see three galaxies straight off (two bright galaxies in a pair with the third separate below). Looking around I could also find two tiny smudges to the RHS (each separate). Hickson 70 – With the 27mm eyepiece, I could see three galaxies that appeared evenly spaced in a line. There was a close pair of galaxies just below them (uneven brightness). Then one additional faint fuzzy off to the RHS. 6 galaxies. Hickson 71 – 27mm eyepiece. Three stars close together are see next to two galaxies that a gap RHS to a tiny galaxy smudge. The last galaxy is in-between (in the gap) and very faint indeed (cannot be held in direct vision). Hickson 69 – 27mm eyepiece. Three galaxies in a triangle formation are easily seen. Wow, there are so many galaxies in and around the fov that I feel overwhelmed by the sheer number and have to keep checking Sky Safari to see if I have the right ones targeted!😀 Hickson 66 – 27mm eyepiece. 3 of 4 seen. Three tiny galaxies seen in a tiny patch in a 2+1 formation. Hickson 45 – 27mm eyepiece. A pair of tiny galaxies are found in-between 2 field stars. There is a possible third galaxy faintly seen underneath. Hickson 49 – On March 1st I failed to find this object (due to the moon) but tonight I found it. 😀There is a very tiny patch of faint fuzzies! There seems to be several very close together. I could see two cores intermittently from within the tiny patch.  
      Epilogue.
      Cloud started rolling over in patches and I was having to pick my spots (of clear sky) which was painful. With more clear night forecast, I decided to go to bed instead.
       
      Clear Skies,
      Alan
    • By alanjgreen
      Scope: 20” f3.6 Lukehurst Dob with Paracorr (fl = 2089mm & f4.1).
      Night Vision: PVS-14 with Photonis 4g INTENS.
      Eyepieces: DeLite 18.2mm (f5.8 x115).
       
      I was out supernovae hunting last night with three SN targets planned
      1= NGC109/SN2019upw
      2= UGC11860/SN2019tua
      3= UGC11979/SN2019tgm
       
      I am happy to report that I observed 2 out of 3. Here are some notes to help others.
       
      NGC109 /  SN2019upw

      This one is fairly straightforward as there are few field stars in the area. Once you find the three brighter stars in a triangle then the galaxy is easily seen in the centre. There are 4 faint stars on one side of the galaxy and one on the other. The SN is separate from the core. As I was only using x115 magnification then the split was not straightforward and time was needed to wait and observe for the split to come and go!
       
      UGC11860/SN2019tua

      This galaxy was really well placed at the zenith at around 1830 last night. The galaxy was not seen but the SN is there. It takes time to find the right spot but there is a field star "3D cube" just above, once you find the cube then you can find the SN. (See stars marked A,B,C,D on my diagram, the Supernova is X).
       
      UGC11979/SN2019tgm

      This is the toughest, there are so many field stars that it is hard to find what to match to the internet images. Anyway, it turned out that I was looking in the wrong place but the stars I drew do match the images so I was just a small way off. 
      Look carefully at my sketch and there are two rows of field stars (the 3+2 and the 3, the middle star of the lower 3 is a double), if you can find these two rows of stars at the eyepiece then the SN is in-between these rows as shown by the blue box (added this morning). I was looking further up in a tight cluster of stars where the tiny galaxy appeared to be (my mistake!).
       
      Happy hunting!
      Alan
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.