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Also known as the Theta Carinae Cluster, The Southen Pleiades is a very bright open cluster in the Carina constellation. It was discovered by Abbe Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1752.  Containing around 60 stars, IC 2602 shines with an overall magnitude of 1.9 and its brightest member is Theta Carinae with a visual magnitude of 2.7. This cluster of young blue stars is relatively close to us at "only" 479 light years.

5 May 2018

092858EC-AC16-48D8-A4B1-7F8FCBB62F1D.thumb.jpeg.6ec49d38665e5f0ae0344e4ba555bce5.jpeg

The Southern Pleiades open star cluster ( IC 2602 ) in Carina ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper )

Image details can be found here.

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