Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_dslr_mirrorlesss_winners.thumb.jpg.9deb4a8db27e7485a7bb99d98667c94e.jpg

Recommended Posts

Also known as the Theta Carinae Cluster, The Southen Pleiades is a very bright open cluster in the Carina constellation. It was discovered by Abbe Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1752.  Containing around 60 stars, IC 2602 shines with an overall magnitude of 1.9 and its brightest member is Theta Carinae with a visual magnitude of 2.7. This cluster of young blue stars is relatively close to us at "only" 479 light years.

5 May 2018

 

9C627407-230D-4D23-A5A4-80FFD0FAD23A.thumb.jpeg.7df7cd3a764ec11e82c9d81903776165.jpeg

The Southern Pleiades ( IC 2602 ) in Carina ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper )

.........

Image details:

Orientation: North is up

Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ).
Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x.
Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7

Mount: Skywatcher EQ8
Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 

Camera:
Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels)

Location:
Blue Mountains, Australia 
Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map )

Capture ( 5 May 2018 ):
14 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/30th sec to 240 sec ) all at ISO250.
( 22 x 240sec + at least 10 each forthe other durations )

Processing:
Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark
Integration in 14 sets
HDR combination 

Pixinsight May 2018

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

Again, beautiful. Nice to see diffraction spikes. Amazing colour. 

Thanks Paul.

The background is quite a bit darker than I like but I had to hide a rather nasty reflection / lens flare artefact caused by the very bright star Theta Carinae ( +2.7 ).  If I get chance I will reframe and take some more long exposure subs - hopefully this will move the problem to somewhere else in the image and I will be able to eliminate it by sigma clipping or, as a last resort, by cutting out and replacing the 'damaged' portion of the image.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By markastro
      Hi,
       
          Looking for a 12" DOB (or larger) which can be transported to Prestwick, Ayrshire. Any brand, as long as the telescope is optically sound and in good working order. I'm a reliable buyer who has bought and sold on this site before.
       
      Thanks,
       
      Mark
    • By rorymultistorey
      So I picked up a classic... a 1970's - 80's edmund optics f6 150mm newtonian...

      ... like this one but mine has a different mount. It was cheap. Very good condition. The focuser is pants. The mechanics of the secondary holder is (IMHO) brilliant and apparently the primary is 1/10th wave.
      But its f6 and I trhink I'd rather swap it out for a faster synta f5 mirror. .  The thing is its a one shot job bc to make the f5 mirror work I will have to saw off a good few cm from the barrel of the scope.
      So the question is: Is a high quality f6 mirror better than a faster synta f5 mirror for wide deep space astrophotograhy?
       
      All comments gratefully received. 😉 
    • By UKAstroBill
      The weather has been so bad I have had the time to finish a video on using astro filters with the Nikon Z bodies and Nikon camera lenses. There is a manual alternative to the FTZ allowing 1.25 inch filters to be fitted between camera and F-mount lenses, and for some lenses and end of lens solution make sense. FAstroTZ is described here:
       
       
       
    • By Asghar
      Hi all,
       
      I'm pretty new to astronomy and need help deciding if I should buy the following telescope or not, mainly if there is anything visibly missing by looking at the photos?
       
      Thanks in advance!



    • By AstroRuz
      Skywatcher 150/1200 f8 planetary Newtonian.
      Bought this originally intending to set up a planetary rig but circumstances call for sale.
      Will come with eyepieces and a collimation eyepiece. Not used by myself and has seen very little use. Mirrors in good condition
      Collection only
      £50



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.