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The Jewel Box ( NGC 4755 ) is an open cluster of mostly hot young blue-white stars that appears to the unaided eye as a bright 4th magnitude star close to the Southern Cross. Only visible from southern latitudes, the Jewel Box was first recorded by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1751 and was later described by Sir John Herschel as "a casket of variously coloured precious stones" - hence the name "Jewel Box".

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The Jewel Box open star cluster ( ngc 4755 ) in Curx  ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper )

Please see here for image details.

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16 hours ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

Beautiful. 

Cheers Paul.

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