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Any Web resources showing what Jupiter looks like continually?


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I was observing Jupiter on Friday 4 May (about midnight) and it was looking really interesting, some shapes in one of the equatorial bands were very intriguing. I wondered what they were, maybe a swirl, or the GRS. I'd like to know what I was looking at. I don't even know which equatorial band was the NEB and which was the SEB.

Are there any resources that record what Jupiter looks like at a given date / time that I could refer to and learn from?

Thanks for the help.

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I cannot think of any online resource, (hopefully someone will be along with an answer). If you have access to an iPhone or iPad there is Jupiter Moons, (and for Saturn, Saturn Moons). Both apps will help with the identity of their moons.

I don't know how long you have been interested in astronomy, but with most 'scopes, the view is... South at the top and North at the bottom. 

Edited by Philip R
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SkySafari does a relatively good job of depicting the general orientation and rotation of the planet as well as the orbit and position of the four Galilean moons. It will not, however, show you any new developments in storm paterns.

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SkySafari shows Jupiter very well. To illustrate this here’s a screen shot from SkySafari 6 Pro from 12:30am on the 7th May, with an actual image I took with my C8 SCT at the same time. It may not show actual live views, but for the GRS it shows when it is showing at least.

5C8133CD-1A4D-4A70-888C-0D93032467B0.thumb.jpeg.8a4421332cd3f5da52ef84d4140c4ca4.jpeg6C6B5B19-4871-41D1-AD39-3AA317A0B92D.thumb.jpeg.1d806ad68ccbf4e4690f6dbc8acdba8d.jpeg

 

Edited by Knighty2112
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I use Jovemoons app. It shows in real time (you can set any date/time too) both the GRS and the position of the moons, you can also check the times of next transits. Very simple and easy to use. 

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As said, none of the apps show real time updates on objects such as festoons, barges or white ovals etc. The GRS predictions are pretty accurate, as are the Galilean moon and shadow transits.

I use SkySafari (inevitably!) but JupiterMoons is a good app. There is a slight issue with GRS timing on Stellarium in that you have to correctly set the position relative to the meridian in order for the timing to be correct. I think there was also a question about whether the time is as it happens or as it is seen on Earth; there can be 35 mins or so light travel time to account for. SkySafari and JupiterMoons always seem to be correct as seen here.

In terms of orientation, newts generally put the view upside down, although the actual angle varies depending on how you have the OTA rotated in its rings. Refractors/SCTs and Maks, assuming used with a mirror or prism diagonal just left/right reverse the view. You can work out NEB and SEB from this hopefully. 

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I tend to use this.

http://www.shallowsky.com/jupiter/

Just noticeds that you were looking for more detail that moons and GRS. Unfortunately that's not really available - because it is al cloud Jupiter changes all the time and most of the features are not in any way permanent. If you want to get a better idea of what you are looking at a good idea would be to start by learning the names of the main belts and zones and the kinds of features. A good link is: http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9781852337506-c1.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-458517-p52086630

From there, why not try sketching what you see? You should be able to hone your observing skills as you identify the features and learn more about the planet.

Hope this helps.

Billy.

Edited by billyharris72
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Thanks for the help everyone.

I guess I was looking for a website where enthusiasts uploaded their pictures of Jupiter on a regular basis so I can get a clearer view of what I actually saw near to the time I was observing.

The SkySafari app does do a good job showing the GRS, but I find Knighty2112's image most helpful (thanks for that!). Based on that, I think I was seeing some of those knotty swirls  in the NEB.

I mostly use a baader amici prism which gives a correct orientation. I know is not ideal but it is the best I have. Someday I might get another diagonal:)

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56 minutes ago, billyharris72 said:

I tend to use this.

http://www.shallowsky.com/jupiter/

Just noticeds that you were looking for more detail that moons and GRS. Unfortunately that's not really available - because it is al cloud Jupiter changes all the time and most of the features are not in any way permanent. If you want to get a better idea of what you are looking at a good idea would be to start by learning the names of the main belts and zones and the kinds of features. A good link is: http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9781852337506-c1.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-458517-p52086630

From there, why not try sketching what you see? You should be able to hone your observing skills as you identify the features and learn more about the planet.

Hope this helps.

Billy.

Thanks Billy. These are great resources. I do like looking for shadow transits especially for some reason and this the shallowsky website is nice and simple to use. The pdf has some great charts, especially the one showing what a festoon or nodule are. Good advice about trying to draw what I see too.

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1 hour ago, PurpleFringe said:

but I find Knighty2112's image most helpful (thanks for that!).

That’s exactly what I do ie go and look in the planetary imaging section and try to find images from around the time I was observing. Would be great to be able to produce a dated/timed resource showing Jupiter images from everyone who posts to try to replicate what you are after. Big job though!

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You can get latest happenings in the outer planets from BAA web site or from http://pvol2.ehu.eus/pvol2/ e.g. Jupiter alert: Convective outbreak in Jupiter's South Temperate Belt 2018. 

To get the latest images available use the 'search data' option.

Edited by melsmore
Added 'search data'
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8 hours ago, melsmore said:

You can get latest happenings in the outer planets from BAA web site or from http://pvol2.ehu.eus/pvol2/ e.g. Jupiter alert: Convective outbreak in Jupiter's South Temperate Belt 2018. 

To get the latest images available use the 'search data' option.

Woohoo, this has to be the winner. Thank you that's exactly what I was looking for. Now bookmarked:) There's a picture from just after midnight on the 5th May that looks like what I saw. Well it has a lot more detail, but the shapes are right. They were festoons:)

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