Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_annual.thumb.jpg.3fc34f695a81b16210333189a3162ac7.jpg

Amateur astronomer or recreational sky observer


jambouk
 Share

Recommended Posts

Well if ever there was a case of pigeon-holing this must be it.

I play golf, but I'm never called "a golfer".  I play off 3 handicap and used to play Kent League, so does this mean I am highly skilled so could actually qualify as an "amateur golfer" or in reality am I just someone who plays golf to a reasonable standard?  However, I cycle and am always called "a cyclist".  In neither hobby do I contribute towards its enhancement or public awareness, I just enjoy doing them.   

Hobby snobbery?

Edited by RayD
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both articles say that amateur astronomy involves "work" and they're probably right, but most of us already have jobs and the last thing we need when we think we've got a gentle hobby is to make it into another "job". I reckon the best description of our pastime lies in the title of this forum - stargazers.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, KenG said:

Both articles say that amateur astronomy involves "work" and they're probably right, but most of us already have jobs and the last thing we need when we think we've got a gentle hobby is to make it into another "job". I reckon the best description of our pastime lies in the title of this forum - stargazers.

Absolutely! If you work, you want relaxation therapy, not more stress. I stopped using equatorial mounts with all their hassels for that reason. Dobsonians are really a step up from binoculars if used in leisurely stargazing, with less strain on neck & shoulder. 

See what can be seen, look it up & enjoy the escapism!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

I think the word amateur itself is to blame. Most people when they hear it, it has implications of being new, a novice, not being very good at what it is you do, inexperienced. 

None of which I believe to be true. 

Unfortunately, Paul, every one of those is true for me :happy11:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, RayD said:

Unfortunately, Paul, every one of those is true for me :happy11:

Which part you having trouble with?. Pointing a scope to the night sky or looking through an EP?. 

LOL. 

It's not rocket science. 

I'm just kidding Ray. 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

*warning kids.... Never point a telescope at the sky during the day without proper solar safety filters in place*. 

We can do it because we are experienced seasoned professional amateur occasional recreational observering stargazer astronomers. 

Am I gonna have to type that every time I wanna say I was out with my scope today/ last night?. 

 

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

*warning kids.... Never point a telescope at the sky during the day without proper solar safety filters in place*. 

We can do it because we are experienced seasoned professional amateur occasional recreational observering stargazer astronomers. 

Am I gonna have to type that every time I wanna say I was out with my scope today/ last night?. 

 

The most expensive business card in the world........... Probably! 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

I think the word amateur itself is to blame. Most people when they hear it, it has implications of being new, a novice, not being very good at what it is you do, inexperienced. 

 

I resemble that remark :D

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

*warning kids.... Never point a telescope at the sky during the day without proper solar safety filters in place*. 

We can do it because we are experienced seasoned professional amateur occasional recreational observering stargazer astronomers. 

Am I gonna have to type that every time I wanna say I was out with my scope today/ last night?. 

 

Yup. 

And kids use fracs projecting the sun as lasers to burn things, generally or to experiment. And in the air with a powerful lamp through the OG through a small eye lens eye piece. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, niallk said:

Richard Feynman:

"A poet once said, “The whole universe is in a glass of wine.” We will probably never know in what sense he said that, for poets do not write to be understood. But it is true that if we look in glass of wine closely enough we see the entire universe. There are the things of physics: the twisting liquid which evaporates depending on the wind and weather, the reflections in the glass, and our imagination adds the atoms. The glass is a distillation of the earth’s rocks, and in its composition we see the secrets of the universe’s age, and the evolution of the stars. What strange array of chemicals are in the wine? How did they come to be? There are the ferments, the enzymes, the substrates, and the products. There in wine is found the great generalization: all life is fermentation. Nobody can discover the chemistry of wine without discovering the cause of much disease. How vivid is the claret, pressing its existence into the consciousness that watches it! If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts — physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on — remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let us give one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!"

Not familiar with that quote but I'm glad I am now Niiallk; thanks for sharing it,  it's typical Feynman poetic and challenging, love it . :) 

Jim 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was called a Geek a couple of weeks ago by someone i don't know because of a t-shirt i was wearing. I wasn't offended. They loved the t-shirt.

It was a physics/Star Wars t-shirt, so not even to do with astronomy.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a recreational sky observer.  When I have the time and it's clear I like go outside and have a closer look at things I've read about.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been a "Stargazer" for over 60 years, I made astronomical equipment professionally for 35 years and I am now an unpaid "provider". At all times I've usually been referred to as Peter.   :icon_biggrin:

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Me looking through scope;

"Isn't that colourful

"Nice pattern (mentally joins star/dots)

"Smear on the eyepiece! Or mirror! Nope, nope, must be in the sky. No clouds so must be an object of some sort. 

"What constellation am I looking towards again?"

Etc. Etc. 

 

Edited by 25585
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, 25585 said:

Me looking through scope;

"Isn't that colourful

"Nice pattern (mentally joins star/dots)

"Smear on the eyepiece! Or mirror! Nope, nope, must be in the sky. No clouds so must be an object of some sort. 

"What constellation am I looking towards again?

Etc. Etc. 

 

We reciting poetry now? LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting thread. To me, professional means more to do with your attitude towards a subject than whether or not you get paid for it. Thus, many amateurs are actually unpaid professionals even if doing it for recreational purposes.

I also think amateur astronomers do contribute to science albeit in a small way. By buying stuff (some of us are definitely professional at that!) we are raising awareness and increasing the popularity of the hobby, and contributing to the growth of the industry. Agreed, not every newcomer sticks with it but it's the same in all hobbies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Similar Content

    • By MarsG76
      NGC 6334, an emission nebula and star-forming region located in the constellation Scorpius, also known as the Cat's Paw Nebula, Bear Claw Nebula or Gum 64. The nebula lies at an estimated distance of about 4,350 light-years from Earth.
      This image was taken from my backyard in Bortle 4-5 skies through a 80mm refractor at F6.25 (500mm focal length) with a QHY268M camera through 7nm H-Alpha, SII and OIII narrowband filters.
      Total exposure time was 18 hours and 15 minutes. Subs captured were HII: 15x600s OIII: 21x1200s and SII: 15x1800s @ HGC:62 on multiple nights between 31st May & 11 June 2021.
    • By Kitsunegari
      So i have confirmed that I am the first amateur in the world to image flux tubes in calcium light.
      accurate pointers added to the first image,  this was not the first time I have captured these;  But it is the first time I have looked into this indepth.     
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_tube
       
       
       
       
       
       
      here are my previous images recorded on November 5th 2020, this was  the first time i ever captured flux tube's, and I had no idea I was the first amateur to image these in calcium light.
         
       
       
      Captured with an explore scientific 127mm x 1200mm,  a skybender, and a meade #140 barlow operating at 3x using a basler aca1920-155um camera and a basler aca720-520 camera    Seeing conditions were obviously more favorable last year and I intend to look for these with a bigger scope.
       
      Processed with Imppg (thank you @GreatAttractor))
       
    • By MarsG76
      This is NGC3603 and NGC3576 (AKA The "Statue of Liberty" nebula), a massive H-Alpha region containing a very compact open cluster, located in the constellation "Carina" about 20,000LY away.
      I took this photo during two nights, 14th and 15th March 2021. Imaged using a active cooled and full spectrum modded Canon 40D DSLR attached to a 80mm f6.25 refractor on a CGEM equatorial mount.
      Total exposure time was 3 Hours and 31 minutes in natural color through UV/IR Cut filtered subs from a semi rural sky.
      RGB: 19x60s, 19x120s, 18x180s and 20x300s subs @ ISO1600.
    • By MarsG76
      This is NGC3603 and NGC3576 (AKA The "Statue of Liberty" nebula), a massive H-Alpha region containing a very compact open cluster, located in the constellation "Carina" about 20,000LY away.
      I took this photo on multiple nights, between 19th February and 15th March 2021.
      Imaged using my cooled and full spectrum modded Canon 40D DSLR attached to a Bosma 80mm f6.25 refractor on a CGEM equatorial mount.
      Total exposure time was 22 Hours and 1 minute using 7nm HII, OIII and SII Narrowband filters and stars are from natural color (UV/IR Cut filter) subs... imaged from a semi rural sky.
      HII: 6x600s, 6x900s and 4x1200s subs,
      OIII: 10x900s, 8x1200s and 1x1800s subs
      SII: 18x1800s subs
      RGB: 19x60s, 19x120s, 18x180s and 20x300s subs @ ISO1600.
       
    • By Alipentouce
      Hello everyone, I hope you are all OK.
      I just signed up for this magnificent website and I thought asking you guys some questions could be helpful.
      Well, astronomy isn't my college major but I've studied a lot about it and I consider myself an amateur astronomer.
      I needed to buy my first ever telescope and I can't decide which to buy!?
      Considering a Celestron Powerseeker50AZ and a Celestron FirstScope, Which one do you think is suitable for me and why?
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.