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MikeODay

A Cluster of Pearls in the Southern Skies ( NGC 3766 - "The Pearl Cluster" )

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Shimmering like a pearl to the naked eye, this open cluster of mostly young blue stars ( known as the "Pearl Cluster" ) is approximately 5500  light years from Earth and was discovered by Abbe Lacaille in 1752 from South Africa.  

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A Cluster of Pearls in the Southern Skies ( NGC 3766 " The Pearl Cluster" ) 
( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be found here )

This HDR image is constructed from 11 sets of exposures ranging from 1/4 sec ( to capture the centre of the brighter stars ) through to 240 seconds ( for the fainter stars of the Milky Way ).  Total exposure time was around 5 hours.

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Image details can be found here

 

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      The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy ( NGC 1365 ) - Chart   ( please click/tap on image see larger and sharper version )
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      General Catalogue -  GC 731
      John Herschel ( Cape of Good Hope ) # 2552 - Nov 28, 29 1837
      Principal Galaxy Catlogue - PCG 13179
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      IRAS 03317-3618
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      DEC (2000.0) -36 deg 8' 36.5"
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      60 Mly distance
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      Image Plate Solution
      ===================================
      Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px ( full size image )
      Rotation .......... -0.003 deg  ( North is up )
      Field of view ..... 58' 37" x 38' 55"
      Image center ...... RA: 03 33 36  Dec: -36 08 27
      ===================================
       
       
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