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After the perma-rain for Plymouth finally breaking last night, I got 1st light using my newly acquired 'defective' Canon 75-300 lens mounted to my CCD via a Geoptik adapter.

Below images are made up of 16 x 300s subs ran through PI and very messily processed.  Have done 2.  The 1st I used TGV on, which I have never used and know nothing about, which may be evident in the image.

The second has had 1 pass of noise reduction on it.

Both stretched and curved.

Option 1 - 5acfd067a045f_HeartNebulaHaOption1.thumb.jpg.04d7adcdcf1336388b270a2523ef1ff1.jpg

Option 2 - 5acfd08bce617_HeartNebulaHaOption2.thumb.jpg.4670af70a6536e35aae0aa846007f169.jpg

Have not used flats on these as my flat box was playing me up last night and as it was 0100 when clouds came in, I could not be bothered to mess around and just wanted to pack up and get some sleep before work.

On the whole I am pleased with what I have achieved.  Is probably only the third or fourth time I have used my CCD in anger and got a decent result out.

Next step is to try again and this time get some flats to help improve things...and learn a bit more about processing NB images in PI too

Thanks for looking

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