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Sunshine    402
Posted (edited)

Amazing facts and detail in this 4K tour of the lunar surface!

 

Edited by Sunshine
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JAO    19

Excellent, thanks for posting, I need to see this o the big screen now!

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goodricke1    277

Now I'm not going to be able to observe Tycho without contemplating that boulder perched on its peak...

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Sunshine    402

i don't see how that boulder could be a mystery though, i would bet it was just below the surface until impact threw it in the air and it came to rest where it is no?.

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goodricke1    277
On 4/13/2018 at 00:26, Sunshine said:

i don't see how that boulder could be a mystery though, i would bet it was just below the surface until impact threw it in the air and it came to rest where it is no?.

I suppose the dynamics of crater formation are such that a large majority of boulders would be flung far away from the crust upheaval which causes the central peak. The experts seem to believe it's sufficiently statistically unusual to justify further research anyway.

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johnfosteruk    7,354

Thanks for posting this, it's wonderful. I wonder what are the chances that boulder landed there after being ejected from a nearby crater impact site. :)

 

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Alfian    1,158

Superb, many thanks. This is going to get watched and watched.

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