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Swithin StCleeve

star maps for binocular astronomy?

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Swithin StCleeve said:

Would you expect to find most of the objects that are in the Sky at Night maps, with 8x40s?

Short answer: Yes.

TL;DNR version: I am aware that a lot of what people think are 10x50s are, in fact, internally stopped to 10x42 or less (one was 10x39!), and the 15x70s are often stopped to 15x62. Also, experience and reasonably good skies aid my observations (and deteriorating eyesight hinders them).  For this reason, I check all the "10x50" objects with 42mm or less (nowadays usually 6.5x32) and the "15x70" objects with 50mm or less. However, I may use the appropriate magnification for e.g. splitting doubles.

Edited by BinocularSky

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That's a really useful resource, thanks Steve (I finally had chance to have a good look at it today).

When did the 'Binocular Tour' feature start in the Sky at Night magazine? I think the earliest I have is June 2017.

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On 10/04/2018 at 19:26, Swithin StCleeve said:

When did the 'Binocular Tour' feature start in the Sky at Night magazine?

April 2013.

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Posted (edited)
On 4/2/2018 at 21:24, Swithin StCleeve said:

I noticed in the Sky at Night magazine, Steven Tonkins does a 'binocular tour' every month. I don't subscribe, (I've always bought Astronomy Now), but I think I may start getting Sky at Night regularly, because his binocular sky maps are pretty fantastic.

The bonus content has black on white printable maps.

Edited by broadway
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On 02/04/2018 at 21:24, Swithin StCleeve said:

I took advantage of the FSO offer of the Opticron 10X50s for £99, they should arrive tomorrow. I can't wait to start using them! My old pair of 10x50s got knocked out of line a while ago, and I've been using some little rubbish Argos things that are about as much use as looking down a toilet roll tube.
I noticed in the Sky at Night magazine, Steven Tonkins does a 'binocular tour' every month. I don't subscribe, (I've always bought Astronomy Now), but I think I may start getting Sky at Night regularly, because his binocular sky maps are pretty fantastic. Cassiopeia is in this month, and there's quite a few objects in there I've put on my 'next clear sky' list. I've ordered a copy of his book on the strength of these charts. Does anyone have it? Does it have maps comparable to the ones in Sky at Night? I've searched my old magazine pile for back-issues of the Sky at Night, and I've found a couple more. Gemini and Cygnus.
What maps do you guys use when you're  binocular observing?
 

I have found that using the PSA Pocket Sky Atlas usually matches up well with what I can see with a pair of 10 x 50 binoculars, which is around mag 9.0.

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This also means that the PSA Pocket Sky Atlas is useful if one is browsing the sky with a finderscope, typically 8x50 or 9x50.

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