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Bright smudge NW of Sinus Iridium (I think)

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At 22:15 BST  this evening I was taking a tour of the terminator and, as I was studying the vicinity of what I think was Sinus Iridium I saw a very bright smudge to its North West. I managed quite sharp focus on the crater edges but the bright smudge woukd not resolve.

Studying my lunar map I beleieve the smudge was either on the edge of Foucault or Hacpalus (Foucault if Hacpalus was disected by the terminator).

I have no idea what I was looking at but, it looked almost like ejecta catching the sun as it settled back to the lunar surface.

Madness I know but.........

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Oh wow, not madness! if i recall some 800+ years ago five monks from Canterbury witnessed the impact which is now Giordano Bruno crater, if you actually witnessed even the smallest impact or the remnants of, still settling.

I’d hate to jump to conclusions, but you may be one of the most privileged few, if indeed, an impact is what you saw.

Edited by Sunshine
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