Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

Kyuzumaki

New to mono imaging filter advice

Recommended Posts

Just wanted a bit of advice regarding mono imaging. I have a few filters that came with my second hand scope. They are all revelation filters I know these are not top quality but has anyone used these for imaging? I was looking at a light pollution filter found this on eBay 

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F370861000046

im sure it’s not perfect but has anyone tried them or similar?

at some point in the future I do plan to buy good filters and make a filter wheel but before spending more I want to make the most of what I have unless it’s entirely futile to try

Edited by Kyuzumaki

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 26.03.2018 at 13:38, Kyuzumaki said:

Just wanted a bit of advice regarding mono imaging. I have a few filters that came with my second hand scope. They are all revelation filters I know these are not top quality but has anyone used these for imaging? I was looking at a light pollution filter found this on eBay 

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F370861000046

im sure it’s not perfect but has anyone tried them or similar?

at some point in the future I do plan to buy good filters and make a filter wheel but before spending more I want to make the most of what I have unless it’s entirely futile to try

that's not a LP filter, it is a moon filter.

And why do you need a LP filter for mono imaging? Is it for luminance? Do you already have narrowband filters or just RGB? Of course starting with what you have already in hand is the best option.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the filters in that photo. Not sure what #8 or the ND one are useful for. All seem to be from the same set.

I found a different light pollution filter by SVBONY which seems to cut the correct frequencies. Someone on the web had one tested altgough it’s a bit more broad spectrum than the high end ones.

 

 

C9D83F1D-25C3-451E-A8DC-1324A891C551.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

visual filters and imaging filters are different. It is hard to judge from these photos but they look like visual filters to me. Maybe you can ask the retailer who sells these filters to be certain.

 

Btw you don't need a LP filter if you are going to image mono. You should have narrowband filters first and then maybe you can use the LP filter as luminance. Or do you just want to get a black and white photo?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just looked them up, the #56 filter is for planetary.  96 looks like a Moon filter.  I too am pretty sure these are observing filters.  

Carole 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a lot of street lights nearby so the logic was simply to remove the sky glow which is prevalent in all my images. (Filter was only £15 so not much lost if it sucks)

They are all sold as observing filters. But I already own these :happy11: so thought they might do for a while. What’s the difference between observing and imaging filters except for cost?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, HunterHarling said:

Imaging filters have anti reflective coatings to reduce halos.

and light transmission is also better. they give more accurate color too. there is a reason why they cost more.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Kyuzumaki said:

I have a lot of street lights nearby so the logic was simply to remove the sky glow which is prevalent in all my images. (Filter was only £15 so not much lost if it sucks)

They are all sold as observing filters. But I already own these :happy11: so thought they might do for a while. What’s the difference between observing and imaging filters except for cost?

There are several differences. The bandpasses of a set of imaging RGB filters are designed to work together to produce a natural colour image in which colour balance is respected and good colour separation is still maximized. The idea is to get the right overall colour and have good colour contrast.

Visual filters are not intended to work together since you can't look through two or three at once! They are designed to increase contrast on specific targets in what becomes roughly monochromatic light.

The more expensive CCD filters are interferometric. They reflect those wavelengths which they seek to exclude. The cheaper CCD filters and (so far as I'm aware) the visual colour filters are absorption filters. I've used both for CCD imaging and, while the interferometric ones are certainly better (giving higher transparency and better colour separation) you can certainly work with less expensive absorption filters - but they should be imaging filters.

Olly

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By yltansg
      Hi,
      I would like to share with you an article written by me on high-resolution solar imaging in different wavelengths.  Glad that the European Physics Journal (EPJ) Web of Conferences published it. You can read it at:   

      https://www.epj-conferences.org/articles/epjconf/abs/2020/16/epjconf_seaan2020_01002/epjconf_seaan2020_01002.html
      You can see the different layers of the Sun in high-resolution images using different setups.  
       
      Best regards.
      Alfred 
    • By Horizon_Brave
      So...a question...let's say you want to shoot in a slightly light polluted area...but you also want to use the IR/UV cut filter...how can you use both then? You can only apply one filter at a time...so are is this a sort of 'pick your poison'? So you can't have IR/UV filtered along with Light pollution as well?
      For example here:
      https://expertphotography.com/best-astrophotography-filters/
       
      There's a ton of great filters...but how is it possible if you need a light pollution filter because of the area you're in..but you also want to cut IR/UV ? It seems like you can only do one at a time.
       
       
      Thanks all..
    • By inFINNity Deck
      As I have replaced them with new-style versions, I have two old-style ZWO 36mm unmounted narrowband filters for sale:
      - H-alpha
      - S-II
      They are pre-2018, so with both sides silver instead of yellow&purple, and come in the original, but opened, packaging. Condition like new.
      Attached images have been made with them. Any decent price will do.
      Nicolàs
       



    • By Ed in UK
      Although I've had my scope for a couple of years it hasn't had much use and I'm pretty much still inexperienced.
      The other night I was looking at M13 which pretty much matches everyone's description of a fuzzy ball. I couldn't really say that I could start to resolve any of the stars, maximum magnication was x100.
      Would a Ultra High Contrast Filter help?
      If so any recommendation please.
      TIA.
      Ed
    • By mih
      Hi, I'm a beginner and I want to buy something for my telescope. I have a Bresser 6 inch Newtonian(750mm focal length) I have 2 lenses, 9mm, 25mm, a moon filter and a 2x barlow. What would be the next thing to get? I was thinking maybe a solar filter, a light pollution filter since i am stuck at home, idk. What are your thoughts on this?
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.