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I often love to play youtube lectures in the background as i work on my home improvement projects, only problem with that is many times my attention gets so focussed on the computer screen that i fail to see paint dripping from my brush onto the carpet, that did happen!. Anyway, here's a great lecture from the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics which is just a couple hours drive from my home about the weirdest stars known, some fascinating facts here with a dose of humour.

 

Edited by Sunshine
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