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Centaurus A Galaxy


MarsG76
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Hi all,

I had a bit of luck with weather so after the little one is asleep, I was able to sneak a few imaging nights. The great thing about permanent setups is that from night to night, imaging can be resumed within minutes with saved than recalled coordinates.

 

Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is a galaxy in the constellation of Centaurus.

 

At 13 million LY, NGC 5128 is one of the closest radio galaxies to Earth and is also the fifth-brightest in the sky, making it an ideal amateur astronomy target.

 

The galaxy is only visible from below very low northern latitudes but is best seen or imaged from the southern hemisphere.

 

This image was taken with a NexStar 8SE 8" SCT at 2032mm focal length, PHD2 autoguided CGEM using a astronomy modded Canon 40D DSLR controlled by APT.

 

It consists of 40 x 300 sec, 30 x 600 sec and 20 x 900 sec ISO800 subs.

 

Clear Skies.

NGC5128_March 2018 Frame.jpg

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On 21 March 2018 at 03:22, Sunshine said:

WOW thats really awesome, can't wait to get my feet wet in AP this summer!

Be careful... It's both frustrating and addictive... You'll start to despise clouds... Haha

in all seriousness.. It's a great hobby.. Problem solving with nice visual rewards... Looking forward to seeing your images.

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On 21 March 2018 at 05:27, carastro said:

Lovely image, I love this target, but its in the wrong hemisphere for me. :crybaby2:

Carole 

I know what you mean... I'd love to see and image M51 and M82... 

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On 21 March 2018 at 05:37, cfpendock said:

For such a long focal length that is stunning.

Chris

Thanks, I'm still wondering whether imaging at 2032mm reveals any more detail than imaging via a FR at 1280mm which would half the imaging time needed for the same object sub brightness.

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1 hour ago, MarsG76 said:

I'm still wondering whether imaging at 2032mm reveals any more detail than imaging via a FR at 1280mm which would half the imaging time needed for the same object sub brightness.

Not sure about that, but I won't argue.  I often image smaller stuff at 2800mm, but even with binned subs there is no way that the seeing where I live is good enough to show really fine detail.  I have also noted that some character from the south of France who regularly posts on this forum seems to get at least as much detail as me when using his TEC140, which is less than half the focal length.  I suppose it's just possible he could have more expertise......

Chris

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4 minutes ago, cfpendock said:

Not sure about that, but I won't argue.  I often image smaller stuff at 2800mm, but even with binned subs there is no way that the seeing where I live is good enough to show really fine detail.  I have also noted that some character from the south of France who regularly posts on this forum seems to get at least as much detail as me when using his TEC140, which is less than half the focal length.  I suppose it's just possible he could have more expertise......

Chris

Or clearer skies... using my kit and seeing, I think that most nights, seeing and guiding accuracy will be between 0.5"-0.8", the rare exceptional nights I did get 0.38" RMS guiding....but still at those levels, a higher focal length than say 1500mm will not reveal any more detail. 

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16 hours ago, tooth_dr said:

Thats one of the best I've seen you produce, simply stunning, and from a 40d, I'll get there some day

Thank you... practice... DSLRs are very capable of some good AP... especially modded... the biggest factor to decent images are polar alignment, Tracking accurately and of course, sky conditions...

Surely a CCD would be more sensitive and a higher res due to cooling and being BW, but my next project is to cool the 40D... I wonder what difference that will make.

 

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    • By MarsG76
      Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is a galaxy in the constellation of Centaurus. It was discovered in 1826 by Scottish astronomer James Dunlop from his home in Parramatta, in New South Wales, Australia.
      At 13 million LY, NGC 5128 is one of the closest radio galaxies to Earth and is also the fifth-brightest in the sky, making it an ideal amateur astronomy target.
      The galaxy is only visible from below very low northern latitudes but is best seen or imaged from the southern hemisphere.
      This image was taken with a NexStar 8SE 8" SCT at 2032mm focal length, PHD2 autoguided CGEM using a astronomy modded Canon 40D DSLR controlled by APT.
      It consists of 40 x 300 sec, 30 x 600 sec and 20 x 900 sec ISO800 subs.
    • By MikeODay
      Galaxy Centaurus A ( NGC 5128 ) in the southern constellation Centaurus 
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      ............
      Updated again - to try to bring out more faint detail ...

      ............
      Updated images ...


      .............
      Originals ...

       

      ( 100% crop )
      Centaurus A is relatively near to us in the local group of galaxies and is around 11 Million light years away. The unusual shape of Centaurus A is believed to be due to an ancient collision between a large elliptical galaxy and a much smaller spiral galaxy. 
      With an apparent magnitude of +6.8, Centaurus A is the fifth brightest galaxy in the night sky and in the middle of the 20th century it was identified as being the strongest radio source in the Centaurus constellation.
      Details:
      Galaxy - Centaurus A ( NGC 5128 )
      Image ( Nova.astrometry.net ):
      Center (RA, hms): 13h 25m 28.924s
      Center (Dec, dms): -43° 01' 25.486"
      Size: 60.5 x 41.1 arcmin
      Orientation: Up is -89.9 degrees E of N
      Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ).
      Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x.
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      Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT
      Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 
      Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels)
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      HDR combination of eight sets of exposures (27, 28 & 29 April 2017):
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      16 x 15 sec ISO 800
      16 x 8 sec ISO 800
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      Links:
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      photo.net/photos/MikeODay
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    • By codeman
      Centaurus A or NGC 5128 is a galaxy in the constellation of Centaurus. Its a Radio galaxy around 10-16 Mly away.
      The image info:
      Telescope: ASA 12'' F3.6
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