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Sunshine

Amazing book, incredible subject!

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If anyone out there is interested in an amazing read, an adventure spanning a century, and an archeological find that changes our understanding of technological history then this book is a must, 

Many have surely heard of the Antikythera Mechanism, no longer is it a mystery ripe with whimsical Alien visitation theories, but a verified and accepted game changer when it comes to understanding our technological evolution through observations of the heavens.

The latest efforts, to crack its secrets, involved scholars at the top of their fields from around the world, and an intrepid  company from Britain at the forefront of X-ray technology. the mystery has been largely cracked and results surrounding this astonishing discovery have been published in the worlds most prestigious publications.

This book is an amazing journey, chronicling it’s  discovery, and the century afterwards where many have tried to unlock its true purpose, it reads like an adventure because it is. Rarely do I ready 170 pages in one sitting, I received this 300 page  book on Friday and was done Sunday, 

It not only tells the story of the effort to crack the mechanisms mysteries, but also does a phenomenal job of explaining how ancient civilizations observed and kept records of happenings in the night sky. It’s a journey through Babylon, Ancient Greece, Roman Empire to name a few. 

Every amateur astronomer would love this book I guarantee, and no, I didn’t write it lol or benefit from sales (wish I did), I’m just passionate about what stirs me, and love to share my experiences.

 

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Just checked it out on Amazon £0.01 ... I'm not going to get much better value than that! Thanks for the recommendation.

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5 hours ago, Demonperformer said:

Just checked it out on Amazon £0.01

could that be real? wow why that cheap?, anyway i thought id give you the link to an amazing documentary on youtube by NOVA which if you're not familiar with produced award winning documentaries for over 40 years.

Ive been weened on NOVA documentaries my whole life, this episode is stunning and deals with the same subject, a riveting episode! the volume is a bit muffled for first 3 min but it opens up.

 

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It's not anecessary unusual price for second hand books on Amazon. You have to pay a coupleof quid postage, but it is stil pretty good. I've had some great bargains from them over the years. 

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Yes they did and it’s amazing, but this mechanism has now been after decades of work confirmed as being fifteen hundred years ahead of its time. Many say it’s value trumps that of the Mona Lisa, latest efforts uncover a machine of staggering complexity, incredible!

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55 minutes ago, Sunshine said:

but this mechanism has now been after decades of work confirmed as being fifteen hundred years ahead of its time.

:happy7:

Nothing is ahead of it's time, we're just obsessed with our technology and way behind in our understanding of their time!

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27 minutes ago, Stub Mandrel said:

Nothing is ahead of it's time, we're just obsessed with our technology and way behind in our understanding of their time!

Agreed, well said actually!

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20 hours ago, Sunshine said:

Yes they did and it’s amazing, but this mechanism has now been after decades of work confirmed as being fifteen hundred years ahead of its time.

Or rather sadly we might surmise that the Renaissance was fifteen hundred years behind its time.....

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