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-ChoJin-

M31 DSLR, yet another one, First Light & my first Astrophoto ;-)

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Hello,

This is my first astrophotography with my own scope (and first light for this scope). I've always been fascinated with this galaxy, and it was my childhood dream to capture it. It finally happened ;-)

You'll find all the technical details on the description on flickr.

Overall it's the first light of my skywatcher Quattro 250mm/1000mm f4, NEQ6, with an unmodded Canon 6D.
Integration time: 1h59
Processed with PixInsight.

link to flickr for the full resolution and description: 

M31 Andromeda Galaxy -- Sur un ciel d'Aubrac

 

 

 

 

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WOW, it is just beautiful, i'm sure those with years of AP experience would be far better judges but i tell ya, on first impression, you could have fooled me that it came from some book!

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Struth your first image....?.  That is mind blowing. And as already said, you have set the bar incredibly high for your second image. No pressure. :) 

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You must be a very experienced amateur astronomer indeed to have produced this at your first attempt at Astro. Photography.
I'm sure many of our fledgling members would be very interested in your methods employed in creating this wonderful Image.
The skies must have been very kind to you
 

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Cracking job and congratulations on now having 'your own' scope. 

Bravo. :)

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That is very nice, if it were mine I would knock back the Saturation a bit and drop the blue curve to make the stars a bit whiter, otherwise it really is a very good first image.

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Glorious! Thats an amazing amount of detail, and I like the blue around the rim of the galaxy, it contrasts nicely with the yellows at the center!

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Unbelievable first shot! Beautiful!!

I'm doing something seriously wrong as I can't get anything close!
 

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Remarkable image @-ChoJin- , I assume you have had much practise with borrowed scopes? You say this is your first with your own scope?

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Very clean.  Well done.  I too would notch down the blue a bit--though that may require a modification of the other colors--hard to say.  Or, if you could manage to capture some Ha to counterpoint the blue.....Also, if you notch the brightness down in the core just a tad I think you will find that the dust lanes will be visible through the glare.  I wouldn't do an HDRcompression--but using Histogram with the rest of the image masked works well (or curves--but I like using the histogram as that maintains the color balance.)

Rodd

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I like it!  Well done.  Brave choice of instrument for a fledging amateur.

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thank you very much for all your kinds words.

regarding the intensity of the blue and the core, I have to admit I tend to like very high contrasted photograph but the other issue I have is that I dont have yet a color calibration device. I'm therefore working with an uncalibrated monitor on my (very old) macbook pro. Hopefully what you're seeing isn't too far from what I intended though...

I just ordered a print on alu dibond (I've read it was a good medium for astrophoto because of the deep black and matte finish), I'll see how the colors look like... And maybe I'll invest in a color calibration device ;-)

I also have to admit I didn't really have prior first-hand experience as a direct scope operator, but I really did my homework first. I tend to read *a lot*. I've read countless of tutorials, this forums, other forums etc. about guiding, software, pitfalls and everything I could find really prior to this.

But overall, I think I also was quite lucky (beginner lucky day syndrome). That night wasn't too windy. The skywatcher quattro 10" is very heavy and bulky, I'm pretty sure it's going to be really tricky on windy nights.

Also, I think I have to thanks the very very dark sky I had. To choose it I used google earth and a special astrophoto light pollution map for it. I then searched for the darkest area I could find in France and still car-accessible (i.e. not high up in the Alpes mountain). I zoomed in.. and I street-searched for a suitable area... So I guess we could say this is the darkest area in France ;-)

Anyway, thank you very much for your kind words.

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It truely is a nice m31 but what about the other first light images you've posted?

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5 minutes ago, Scott said:

It truely is a nice m31 but what about the other first light images you've posted?

I think it says first light with this particular kit, whereas on the other image he was using one in an observatory that his cousin owns/manages. 

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