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Kidderminster newbie


Ande
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12 minutes ago, Ande said:

Wow!! That’s very kind of you. And reassuring to know that I’m in the same vicinity as someone with a wealth of knowledge. I may well take you up on your generous offer.  Thank you ? 

No problemo :) 

Im on the imaging side of things, but I have been known to use an eyepiece a few times. ..lol.

Are you DY10 or DY11? 

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13 minutes ago, Ande said:

From what I can gather, GOTO systems seem to have got a lot friendlier over the last 10 years or so.  I think the big dilemma for me is either get a GOTO and see lots more, but poorer quality, or go fully manual and demonstrate my complete ineptitude at sky navigation, but see the odd thing in all it’s glory ?

There’s no substitute for learning your way around the sky, otherwise the show will be over soon once the scope shows you everything. For me, looking for Uranus one night with my lightbridge for the better part of an hour was more fun than most movies these days. Once I found it, the little greenish orb it was, almost indistinguishable from nearby stars, it was amazing.

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4 hours ago, rwilkey said:

Hi Ande and a warm welcome from me!  When I bought my first scope I went for the biggest one I could see and afford (at an exhibition), this happened to be the 200P and an EQ5 mount, dead pleased with the results it gives so the 250PX should offer you great views, good luck!

Thanks for the welcome. Really pleased that your scope is serving you well. I haven’t entirely ruled out a 200P myself yet.  I know quite a few on here seem to suggest going for the 200P instead and using the saved money to buy better eyepieces etc.  My head is currently spinning with all of the permutations of choice ?

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3 minutes ago, Uranium235 said:

No problemo :) 

Im on the imaging side of things, but I have been known to use an eyepiece a few times. ..lol.

Are you DY10 or DY11? 

 

If all goes well, I’d love to migrate across to the imaging side.  I’m in DY10.  Right by the Cavalier pub.

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5 minutes ago, Sunshine said:

There’s no substitute for learning your way around the sky, otherwise the show will be over soon once the scope shows you everything. For me, looking for Uranus one night with my lightbridge for the better part of an hour was more fun than most movies these days. Once I found it, the little greenish orb it was, almost indistinguishable from nearby stars, it was amazing.

 I just hope I can get through the steep learning curve to be able to reach that point.   Sounds amazing ?

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3 minutes ago, Ande said:

 

If all goes well, I’d love to migrate across to the imaging side.  I’m in DY10.  Right by the Cavalier pub.

Ahh, other side of town then! Shouldn't be a problem, just a 5min drive for me.

Shame the weather is so dire, no breaks in the cloud due for at least a week.

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29 minutes ago, Ande said:

 I just hope I can get through the steep learning curve to be able to reach that point.   Sounds amazing ?

Oh no my friend, do not fear at all, if you approach it as a task or a mountain you must climb then it becomes a job and not a beautiful hobby. You have time, peek at the sky through your scope and allow yourself time to learn about just how incredible the objects you saw are. Little by little you’ll see, it’s not a upward curve you must scale, it’s an experience you enjoy at your own leisure. Forget about how much you need to learn and just allow yourself the time to watch and wonder, the knowledge you need regarding scopes and procedures will slowly present themselves to you and this forum is here for that.  This hobby is absolutely not about who knows more than who, it’s about what you take from the experience. I once looked through a large scope years ago at M57, 24 inch dob, the owner never stopped spewing about the details of M57 and his scopes perfect mirror as I watched M57, everything went in one ear and out the other because I was just so taken by the stunning sight, he knew so much more than I, but it mattered nothing to me, I won’t forget that.

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1 hour ago, Sunshine said:

Oh no my friend, do not fear at all, if you approach it as a task or a mountain you must climb then it becomes a job and not a beautiful hobby. You have time, peek at the sky through your scope and allow yourself time to learn about just how incredible the objects you saw are. Little by little you’ll see, it’s not a upward curve you must scale, it’s an experience you enjoy at your own leisure. Forget about how much you need to learn and just allow yourself the time to watch and wonder, the knowledge you need regarding scopes and procedures will slowly present themselves to you and this forum is here for that.  This hobby is absolutely not about who knows more than who, it’s about what you take from the experience. I once looked through a large scope years ago at M57, 24 inch dob, the owner never stopped spewing about the details of M57 and his scopes perfect mirror as I watched M57, everything went in one ear and out the other because I was just so taken by the stunning sight, he knew so much more than I, but it mattered nothing to me, I won’t forget that.

That’s a wonderful  way of looking at things. I guess even peering at the moon is reward in itself, and requires no pre-knowledge. Anything beyond that is a bonus. Let a beautiful journey begin ?

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1 hour ago, swag72 said:

Hi and welcome to SGL - This is a great place to be, so settle down and enjoy the ride. Remember, none of us were born knowing any of this stuff, so if you get stuck just ask :)

Thank you Sara.  I think that, although this forum is incredibly welcoming, the vast wealth of knowledge that so many possess and demonstrate can be a tad intimidating. I’ll just take things slowly, and see what gems I pick up along the way ?

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3 hours ago, Ande said:

That’s a wonderful  way of looking at things. I guess even peering at the moon is reward in itself, and requires no pre-knowledge. Anything beyond that is a bonus. Let a beautiful journey begin ?

An amazing journey it is sir! As mentioned, you will find what you see far more fascinating if you allow yourself time to read about, watch YouTube videos and documentaries about the universe and it’s wonders. 

Before you even head out, check and see what the night sky has to offer that day by way of sky apps, have a game plan, a small list of targets so when you head out you’re not wondering what to look for. 

This will make your sessions more fruitful and less time fumbling about in the dark, spotting the most well known and visible constellations like Orion provides a stepping stone to other constellations nearby. Once you know which constellation you’re looking at, use an app for example to figure out what targets it has to offer, make sure your viewfinder is aligned to your scope and pay attention to the targets position relative to stars you can see with your naked eye and on your app and point your scope in that direction. Use a low power eyepiece at first to locate your target, only then you can increase power. 

Finding a target like the dumbbell nebula in a high power eyepiece is like trying to spot a fly through a straw.

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Dunno about Ben-Hur, but greetings from a Kidderminster exile now living  where the chariot riding Boudicca kicked out all of his mates. The former chariot racing circuit being the only road in Colchester without potholes.

Loads of dark sky around 'Kiddy' so get a portable scope and head into the Servern valley corridor between the Ludlow Road and Bridgnorth Road. Loads of little car parks along the river. 

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10 hours ago, noah4x4 said:

Dunno about Ben-Hur, but greetings from a Kidderminster exile now living  where the chariot riding Boudicca kicked out all of his mates. The former chariot racing circuit being the only road in Colchester without potholes.

Loads of dark sky around 'Kiddy' so get a portable scope and head into the Servern valley corridor between the Ludlow Road and Bridgnorth Road. Loads of little car parks along the river. 

Thanks Noah4x4. I’ll definitely bear that area in mind. Not far to drive at all. Sounds like a very firm option too ?

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10 hours ago, Sunshine said:

An amazing journey it is sir! As mentioned, you will find what you see far more fascinating if you allow yourself time to read about, watch YouTube videos and documentaries about the universe and it’s wonders. 

Before you even head out, check and see what the night sky has to offer that day by way of sky apps, have a game plan, a small list of targets so when you head out you’re not wondering what to look for. 

This will make your sessions more fruitful and less time fumbling about in the dark, spotting the most well known and visible constellations like Orion provides a stepping stone to other constellations nearby. Once you know which constellation you’re looking at, use an app for example to figure out what targets it has to offer, make sure your viewfinder is aligned to your scope and pay attention to the targets position relative to stars you can see with your naked eye and on your app and point your scope in that direction. Use a low power eyepiece at first to locate your target, only then you can increase power. 

Finding a target like the dumbbell nebula in a high power eyepiece is like trying to spot a fly through a straw.

Many thanks Sunshine. Some great tips there, all of which I shall try to take forward with me. I’m really looking forward to getting started. Currently going through a bit of a choice crisis though. Although I’m convinced that the 250px would offer me the best image quality for the money I have, I’m not altogether sure it’s going to be practical.  My garden is more of a yard, meaning that the window of sky available to me is quite restricted. If I buy a large dob, it’s going to be tricky to take out on trips as I only have a little Fiat 500. So I’m now considering a mak, maybe as a first scope, and, if all goes well, then purchasing a dob for home use only. 

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4 hours ago, Ande said:

Many thanks Sunshine. Some great tips there, all of which I shall try to take forward with me. I’m really looking forward to getting started. Currently going through a bit of a choice crisis though. Although I’m convinced that the 250px would offer me the best image quality for the money I have, I’m not altogether sure it’s going to be practical.  My garden is more of a yard, meaning that the window of sky available to me is quite restricted. If I buy a large dob, it’s going to be tricky to take out on trips as I only have a little Fiat 500. So I’m now considering a mak, maybe as a first scope, and, if all goes well, then purchasing a dob for home use only. 

Without a smigeon of a doubt, anyone here would tell you, choose the scope you know you’ll be using the most given your circumstances. The golden rule in this hobby is widely recognized as “your best scope is the one you use most” regardless of technical specifications and type.

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That web site does not seem to be working ,,,,

Please try wolvas.org.uk we are a vert friendly bunch, also I run an astronomy group at Perton Library in South Staffs, next meeting is this Thursday at 7pm we welcome beginners and are happy to give advice on a scope.

Steve

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Hi Steve.  Thanks for the Carolian suggestion. I had a little peep at their website a few days ago, but I work strange patterns.  They meet up every second Wednesday of the month which rules me out this month and next, as I work in Devon for many days at a time. I’m in Devon until Friday, so I shall be unable to attend your meeting either.  Work is a real [removed word].

Regarding the Meade, I sold it quite some years ago as I just couldn’t find the time to get to grips with it.  I’m planning to order my ‘scope on Thursday, whilst here, and then get back home on Friday and hope it arrives. It’s a tiny bit frustrating as I’m working only a couple of miles away from the Marsh Barton estate where FLO are based.  If I had a car that was a hell of a lot bigger, I’d pop round and pick it up ?

Many thanks for the offer of the ETX rundown. I’d have bitten your hand off if I still had it.

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