Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

MarsG76

I think I discovered a NEW SUPERNOVA!!!! Where to Report?

Recommended Posts

Totally agree, even if it was the reflection of the rearview mirror of the Tesla, it was VERY intriguing ;)

We can even give it a name, - something like MG-USO "Unknown Shining Object" :) 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great thread. It doesn't really count as a false alarm in my book; it looks to be something real, that the big boys have taken seriously so it's all excellent stuff :) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow that is impressive! Maybe report it to the BAA. The BAA is the British Astronomical Association  https://britastro.org/ .

Edited by Dave1
Just read through the whole 3 pages instead of just the first page! So it was a false alarm, better luck next time.
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be interested in the results - I remember finding a similar transient "star" that came and went between subs a few years ago and have always wondered what it was.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It might be worth asking around to see if anyone else was observing the target at around the same time.  It's a common target so there is a chance.  You never know.  If you can see it in two different setups then you'd confirm it was real. 

It doesn't look like a cosmic ray as they tend not to look exactly like stars.  I would have expected optic ghosting to be observed in all frames.  If the mount 'bounced' then you should see the effect on other bright stars if you stretch the image.  Shock breakout is OK but looking at the article you need a Type II supernova.  That requires a massive star.  If we assume that the carina nebula is 'relatively' opaque then it is unlikely we would be seeing a star in another galaxy. Therefore the massive star would be in the Carina Nebula and we should see it.  That scenario probably can hence likely be ruled out. 

Perhaps my best proposed solution is maybe a White Dwarf and a cool companion.  It's effectively a CV with the White Dwarf stripping material from the cool companion which then erupts briefly.  It would also be difficult to see (especially if the WD is cool).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Whirlwind said:

It might be worth asking around to see if anyone else was observing the target at around the same time.  It's a common target so there is a chance.  You never know.  If you can see it in two different setups then you'd confirm it was real.

This strikes me as an excellent idea (perhaps because I was just about to suggest it myself :) Fascinating thread regardless of the outcome.

James

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, RolandKol said:

MG-USO "Unknown Shining Object"

I like it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Shibby said:

I'd be interested in the results - I remember finding a similar transient "star" that came and went between subs a few years ago and have always wondered what it was.

That might be it also, unfortunately for us, a transient star in unconfirmable...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Whirlwind said:

It might be worth asking around to see if anyone else was observing the target at around the same time.  It's a common target so there is a chance.  You never know.  If you can see it in two different setups then you'd confirm it was real. 

A SGL user, hjw, in Melbourne image the area the next evening and the object was gone.

I also posted on "Ice in Space" forum and posted the coords, to date no one reported any thing, and lastly, I imaged the area in RGB, OIII and another SII exposure from 9pm till 6am and none of my subs showed the object... I dare say that the object is gone, or maybe temporarily asleep...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Whirlwind said:

It doesn't look like a cosmic ray as they tend not to look exactly like stars.  I would have expected optic ghosting to be observed in all frames.  If the mount 'bounced' then you should see the effect on other bright stars if you stretch the image.  Shock breakout is OK but looking at the article you need a Type II supernova.  That requires a massive star.  If we assume that the carina nebula is 'relatively' opaque then it is unlikely we would be seeing a star in another galaxy. Therefore the massive star would be in the Carina Nebula and we should see it.  That scenario probably can hence likely be ruled out. 

Perhaps my best proposed solution is maybe a White Dwarf and a cool companion.  It's effectively a CV with the White Dwarf stripping material from the cool companion which then erupts briefly.  It would also be difficult to see (especially if the WD is cool).

I completely agree with you statement about ghosting, telescope bounce and cosmic ray...

Dwarf stripping material is very interesting... like I stated above, HJW in Melbourne image the area the next night and I image that night between clouds and the night after 9pm-6am in RGB, OIII and SII and the object is gone...

Perhaps it'll flare up again in the future... this time being caught by many others and also the pros.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, tooth_dr said:

But we saw it here first on SGL!

Exactly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just found this thread and it was very exciting reading! Please keep us updated about Jeff's analysis of your subs and his suggestion of what it could have been - and could still be....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, gorann said:

I just found this thread and it was very exciting reading! Please keep us updated about Jeff's analysis of your subs and his suggestion of what it could have been - and could still be....

As soon as I have something new, I'll update here...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 26/03/2018 at 01:42, wok said:

Holy cow... the coords are very near my reported object except that I reported on 9th March not 21st... than where's my credit for reporting and sending a photo first???

How dodgy!!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you sure it is the same thing?

Observations reported to the AAVSO:
2018 March 15.34 UT, <17.0 V (ASAS-SN; ATel #11454);
20.32, >10 V (brighter than 10 V (saturated); ASAS-SN, discovery; ATel #11454);
21.44380, 6.5 (R. Stubbings, Tetoora Road, VIC, Australia);

If I am reading these stats correctly, this object was fainter than 17th mag on 15th March and had brightened to brighter than 10th mag on 20th March. And it certainly seems to have hung around longer than yours did. Maybe your object was some kind of preliminary rumbling [do objects like this have those?]? Was this one of the organisations to whom you reported your findings? Might be worth having a quiet word    [aavso@aavso.org], as you clearly have copies of communications earlier in the month about your object.

 

Edited by Demonperformer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Demonperformer said:

Are you sure it is the same thing?

Observations reported to the AAVSO:
2018 March 15.34 UT, <17.0 V (ASAS-SN; ATel #11454);
20.32, >10 V (brighter than 10 V (saturated); ASAS-SN, discovery; ATel #11454);
21.44380, 6.5 (R. Stubbings, Tetoora Road, VIC, Australia);

If I am reading these stats correctly, this object was fainter than 17th mag on 15th March and had brightened to brighter than 10th mag on 20th March. And it certainly seems to have hung around longer than yours did. Maybe your object was some kind of preliminary rumbling [do objects like this have those?]? Was this one of the organisations to whom you reported your findings? Might be worth having a quiet word    [aavso@aavso.org], as you clearly have copies of communications earlier in the month about your object.

 

Not sure.. of course I will image the same area tonight to see if anything flared up in the area I reported on 10th March... The coordinates on this report are close to my one but, still far enough away to be a different object, and certainly out of the FOV of my 40D at 2032mm FL.

Before I continue on the nebula I'm imaging now.. a not commonly imaged nebula below the Carina, I'll move the scope onto eta Carine for 30 or so minutes to have a look for any changes.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they were not one of the organisations you contacted, I would still be inclined to get in touch if this object is very near to the coordinates you had. The likelihood of two completely unrelated events happening in such close (line of sight) proximity in such a short space of time I would say is unlikely [OK, if the universe is big enough everything is going to happen at some point].

The evidence you have suggests that your event came and went within the space of about 30 minutes. Maybe all such 'novae' have a precursor event, but they have not been seen before because they last such a short time and no one has ever been looking in precisely the right place at precisely the right time. Your observation still has the potential to increase our scientific knowledge of the universe ... and may prove to be even more important than merely discovering another 'run-of-the-mill' supernova.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to party poop, but to my eye that location is the other side of the nebula? - I may be wrong...

Can you upload a astrometry.net platesolve of your image (or one without any annotation)

 

Edited by Stub Mandrel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 26/03/2018 at 18:07, Demonperformer said:

If they were not one of the organisations you contacted, I would still be inclined to get in touch if this object is very near to the coordinates you had. The likelihood of two completely unrelated events happening in such close (line of sight) proximity in such a short space of time I would say is unlikely [OK, if the universe is big enough everything is going to happen at some point].

The evidence you have suggests that your event came and went within the space of about 30 minutes. Maybe all such 'novae' have a precursor event, but they have not been seen before because they last such a short time and no one has ever been looking in precisely the right place at precisely the right time. Your observation still has the potential to increase our scientific knowledge of the universe ... and may prove to be even more important than merely discovering another 'run-of-the-mill' supernova.

It was one of the organizations that I contacted but as pointed out by Stub Mendrel, it was close to the location of my image but a different part of the Nebula. 

On 26/03/2018 at 19:57, Stub Mandrel said:

Sorry to party poop, but to my eye that location is the other side of the nebula? - I may be wrong...

Can you upload a astrometry.net platesolve of your image (or one without any annotation)

 

You are right... close but no cigar...

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 26/03/2018 at 21:56, hjw said:

There is a picture on the APOD website: https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180325.html .

It's raining here right now, so no chance to have a go at it :(

Well it might last another few days.

Clear skies

HJ

I imaged the Nebula again on 27th to see any changes, this time through a focal reducer and the nova was just out of the FOV...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By MarsG76
      Thor's Helmet Nebula, NGC 2359, located in the constellation Canis Major.
      This image total exposure time (of used subs) was 35 hours through HAlpha and OIII narrowband filters and was imaged through a 8" SCT at 2032mm focal length using a astro-modded and cooled DSLR.
      This image was a bit of a challenge with the Australian bushfires sending a lot of smoke into the atmosphere, causing me to throw out a lot of failed subs. 35 hours are the selected best subs I used on this image but have spent a lot more time in tracking this nebula from 30 November 2019 until 4 January 2020.
    • By MarsG76
      The Sculptor Galaxy, also known as the Silver Coin or Silver Dollar Galaxy, NGC 253, an intermediate, starburst spiral galaxy in the constellation Sculptor, about 11.4 million LY away, undergoing a period of intense star formation.
      This photo was imaged in natural color through my 8" Celestron SCT at 2032mm focal length using my astro-modded and cooled canon 40D DSLR and tracked with a CGEM mount.
      I imaged this galaxy when the moon was nearly at first quarter and in the same general direction as the galaxy, so I used the Neodymium filter (AKA Moon and Skyglow filter) instead of the UV/IR Cut filter to try and control the moon glare, I think it worked.
      Total exposure time was 5 hours 41 minutes.
       
    • By MarsG76
      Object name: "Southern Triangulum" Galaxy
      Constellation: Sculptor
      Object ID: NGC300
      Exposure Date: 28 September - 24 October 2019
      Distance: ~6.3 million LY
      Exposures: RGB: 15x60s, 17x120s, 15x150s, 1x180s, 6x300s, 39x450s, 54x630s UHCLPR: 10x180s, 3x900s, 8x1200s, 5x1500s, 2x1800s Nd: 10x900s, 11x1200s, 27x1050s HII: 10x1200s, 12x1350s, 14x1500s @ ISO1600 (51h01m30s)
      Telescope: Celestron C8
      Focal length: 2032mm
      Camera: Full Spectrum Modded & Cooled Canon 40D
      Guiding: Celestron Off Axis Guider/PHD2 Guiding
      Mount: CGEM
       
    • By MarsG76
      The Orion Nebula imaged in RGB through a Celestron 8" SCT at F10 (2032mm FL) using a full spectrum modded and cooled Canon 40D. Tracked using a Celestron CGEM mount. Total exposure time was 1 hour and 24 minutes.
    • By MarsG76
      The Omega Nebula, aka The swan Nebula, M17/NGC6618 imaged in Narrowband and combined in Hubble palette style. The photo was imaged with a astromodded and cooled DSLR through a 8" SCT across multiple networks gets from 28 July - 8 August 2019.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.