Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

Sign in to follow this  
Bluecloudyeagle

Mercury - Venus conjunction, march 2018

Recommended Posts

Luckily had a really clear evening with no clouds on the western horizon :D I'll try to catch the Venus- Uranus conjunction too at the end of this month 

IMG_4264.JPG

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's fantastic. First clear evening we get i must get out there with the binos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/7/2018 at 20:18, Hayduke27 said:

Cool photo!

thanks :)

On 3/7/2018 at 21:37, russ said:

That's fantastic. First clear evening we get i must get out there with the binos.

thanks! :)

On 3/8/2018 at 01:36, Pete Presland said:

Fabulous capture. I was watching the same view a few hours later tonight from very here in the UK

thank you! that's great!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      yesterday evening after doing the sketch of the three-day old moon, we had a wonderful twilight scene with Venus and the Moon over here.
      So I did a pastel sketch how I recalled it afterwards:

      Clear skies!
      Achim
    • By ShrewView
      With the extra time I have at the moment, and the weather being so good, I’ve been catching up on a few jobs I’ve been meaning to do. One of these is the re-spotting and recollimation of the mirror on my newt. I found I didn’t have any ring binder re-enforcers but made something similar by hole punching a self-adhesive label and carefully cutting out.

      With the collimation done and the sun setting I was keen to see whether my time had been well spent. I think it was November when I last had a proper evening of astro, my efforts earlier this week got hazed out, so I was looking forward to this!

      First up was Venus in the early twilight. Using my binoviewers and a couple of filters in combination (a ND0.9 and the baader neodinium) I got some encouragement with some good sharp views. I could almost swear I could see a little detail but I’m sure that was just wishful thinking. I also tried a UHC and O111 filters as I had some, but they didn’t show anything better. In fact, the O111 had the peculiar effect that after a few minutes observing a bright green target, when I came to look up at Venus by eye, it appeared a bright and angry orange colour, like Arcturus on steroids.

      After Venus I chose M45 and then the open clusters in Auriga and this was where my earlier work really showed its value. So many pin sharp little stars, far more than I recall when I last viewed these targets. I always feel surprised at how good these targets are though with M37 and 38 the best of them, being a bit more compact.

      I also had my new TS80mm frac out to see what I could catch and to compare views of the same targets. All were pleasing, albeit smaller in scale. I was also glad to be able to spot M65 and 66 in Leo. Obviously not as good as in the bigger newt which will show the triplet of galaxies in the same field. Still, I’m happy to know I can pick those up in my local skies with this little scope. It bodes well for darker sky trips in future.

      I followed up with some globs and ended with M13 in Hercules. Always a favourite, but by now a thin film of ice was settling on the scopes and my chair so it was time to call it a night.

      I’ve been really cheerful today as a result of getting some scope time in, which just shows the value of a good hobby in times like these.

      Thanks for reading.

    • By JBR1194
      Hello
      I recently purchased a new celestron telescope and set it up last night to use for the first time. I live in UK, around 8/9pm-ish I took my telescope outside to view Venus in the western sky as it was v bright, perfect opportunity.
      After finding Venus and increasing the focus I realised that there was something like a large black circle in the centre of the bright blue/white ring of light. Before focussing, it appeared to be just v bright light. 
      I am wondering if anyone can explain to me why this black circle appeared on / in front of Venus.  I thought it looked like a moon, which is obviously incorrect but it looked that way. Is it possibly sulphuric clouds of Venus absorbing light? 
      Any information/help is much appreciated
      happy observing, all!
    • By alanjgreen
      Just bagged 10 minutes between the clouds and got to see the Mercury shadow transit!
      Its so long since I used the Lunt that I took a few seconds to get back into the groove of tuning the double stack and letting some air into the tuner as it was flat.
      Not much else on the disc - 3 x sets of proms, 3 tiny filaments, saw one small bright flux patch briefly.
      But the Mercury shadow was nice and clear and a decent sized patch too.
      Just got back inside before it started spotting with rain! Fingers crossed for another clear patch later ...
      Alan
    • By ian61
      We are hoping to observe the transit in school (Don’t panic - we have done several transits and partial eclipses in the past so we are fine on the safety aspects - thanks). However does anyone know how I can get hold of some links to use in advance of the day that we can use to put some professional feeds up on the large screen tellies we have linked up to the computer systems these days – I am told that links on YouTube are the easiest to handle on the slightly clunky system we have to control them.
      My question comes from reminiscing with colleges that my daughter and I had stayed up to watch first contact of the last transit of Venus live from Hawaii before swapping to Mt Wilson. (We were also up before dawn on top of the local hill fort as the sun rose having lugged an old 4” reflector up there.) Of course at the time we were just browsing through the internet not taking good note of sites we were on.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.