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NGC 1528 at 150x

0C7A95C2-A19C-4E95-98B7-4CF6C4C6C233.thumb.png.8609e2136e29c6c276218c50f8cf47ee.png

Spent just under 45 minutes at the eyepiece, so ran up against the issue of field rotation (really for first time in my limited sketching experience) and realized the importance of not only anchoring features to certain areas within the eyepiece, but also (and probably more importantly) using the relative locations between 3 and 4 stars at a time to make as accurate a sketch as possible.

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Nice sketch, Rick. It looks like a very good target for sketches, with a reasonable number of stars and some interesting patterns.

Good points about anchoring the sketch. When I sketch (which is rare, and certainly produces nothing I would care to share on a public forum!), I find that I always have to start with the outside and then fill in the middle - otherwise I tend to run out of space at the edge and stand no chance of getting proportions anything like right.

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Thanks! Trust me, I don’t have too much I care to share in public either!! :happy8:

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On 04/03/2018 at 05:15, Demonperformer said:

Nice sketch, Rick. It looks like a very good target for sketches, with a reasonable number of stars and some interesting patterns.

Good points about anchoring the sketch. When I sketch (which is rare, and certainly produces nothing I would care to share on a public forum!), I find that I always have to start with the outside and then fill in the middle - otherwise I tend to run out of space at the edge and stand no chance of getting proportions anything like right.

Don't be shy! I bet your sketches are better than you think, and may inspire others to have a go! And even if the end result isn't what you'd like it to be, you've almost certainly seen more detail in the object you're looking at than you'd have seen had you only looked at it.

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On 05/03/2018 at 03:43, RJ901 said:

Thanks! Trust me, I don’t have too much I care to share in public either!! :happy8:

Rick, if you're other sketches are anything like this one, then they are certainly worth sharing. Great sketch and observation! I look forward to seeing more in the future! :thumbsup:

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12 minutes ago, mikeDnight said:

I bet your sketches are better than you think

Trust someone who has seen them ... they aren't!

13 minutes ago, mikeDnight said:

you've almost certainly seen more detail in the object you're looking at than you'd have seen had you only looked at it

Totally agree with you on this. Most of my time is spent imaging, which nicely circumvents the problem of my (lack of) ability. When doing visual, I do like to make "paper" recordings (little crosses in their rough positions) or sometimes use a dictophone to do a voice recording, detailing what I am seeing. Same principle, I am forcing myself to actually see what I am looking at.

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4 hours ago, Demonperformer said:

or sometimes use a dictophone to do a voice recording, detailing what I am seeing.

Love this idea! Thanks!

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