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Telescope for a rookie astronomer


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Hi everyone. I own an original starseeker 130 from orion that I had for years now .it's ok but doesn't have the power I'm looking for. I'm looking for a telescope that brings deep sky objects close and wanted to start astrophotography .ive been deciding what to get for month's now and its confusing to me. I was thinking about a orion sirius 8 inch or 10 inch atlas. I wanted to get a canon T6 Eos camera for photos. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated 

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Paboy

Have an ED80 on an EQ5 equatorial mount

Use Canon 600D camera

Will need a T-ring and extension tube to mount the camera

Have attached pic of my ED80 taken at a club field day

Scope behind mine, is also a ED80 on a EQ6 mount, and shows camera attached

John

 

Skywatcher ED80.jpg

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3 hours ago, Paboy46 said:

Hi everyone. I own an original starseeker 130 from orion that I had for years now .it's ok but doesn't have the power I'm looking for. I'm looking for a telescope that brings deep sky objects close and wanted to start astrophotography .ive been deciding what to get for month's now and its confusing to me. I was thinking about a orion sirius 8 inch or 10 inch atlas. I wanted to get a canon T6 Eos camera for photos. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated 

First off, what's your budget for everything?  Second, do you want to start with a visual or astrophotography upgrade?  Third, how keen are you on hefting heavy loads?  Fourth, how dark are your skies from where you generally observe?

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18 minutes ago, Louis D said:

First off, what's your budget for everything?  Second, do you want to start with a visual or astrophotography upgrade?  Third, how keen are you on hefting heavy loads?  Fourth, how dark are your skies from where you generally observe?

My budget for the scope and mount is 2000. I wanted it for astrophotography. Since I'm new at this I wanted my telescope to be the last one I will ever buy and Wil give me a lot of time to learn on it. I work 3 days a week 12 hour days and have a lot of time on my hands. Lifting isn't a problem. I was told the bigger the scope the better the views however my scope is the only one I've ever looked through lol. Thank you

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47 minutes ago, cletrac1922 said:

Paboy

Have an ED80 on an EQ5 equatorial mount

Use Canon 600D camera

Will need a T-ring and extension tube to mount the camera

Have attached pic of my ED80 taken at a club field day

Scope behind mine, is also a ED80 on a EQ6 mount, and shows camera attached

John

 

Skywatcher ED80.jpg

 

48 minutes ago, cletrac1922 said:

Paboy

Have an ED80 on an EQ5 equatorial mount

Use Canon 600D camera

Will need a T-ring and extension tube to mount the camera

Have attached pic of my ED80 taken at a club field day

Scope behind mine, is also a ED80 on a EQ6 mount, and shows camera attached

John

 

Skywatcher ED80.jpg

That looks like a very nice set up. My question is does that scope bring dso close for imaging and photos. As i said i know little to nothing about scopes. I've looked at pics online of nebula and galaxies and some of the equipment used,I was shocked when I seen they used a 6 inch scope for there beautiful views and thought for sure it would be a bigger scope. I wanted to spend no more than 2000 for the scope and mount, thanks a lot for your time

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Software you use to process your images

I take about 30 exposures of around 30 seconds each as eliminates star trails

Also take same number of exposures dark light, lens cap on, and assists with noise reduction

Equatorial mount also tracks the DSO you are imaging

You will gets lot of help in here

Also if there is an astronomy club near where they work, clubs also run AP workshops, and members also only happy to show you their set-up before you race out and buy something, which then does not work for you

In process of ordering a Coronado Solarmax II solar scope, with BF10 filter

Will go onto my EQ5 mount, and use for solar imaging

Pic shows solar filter attached to the ED80's

John 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Paboy46 said:

My question is does that scope bring dso close for imaging and photos.

Hi Paboy and welcome to the forum. The answer to your question is double edged I'm afraid. Telescopes only gather light and focus it - they don't necessarily enlarge it. The larger apertures will gather more light than smaller apertures and their ability to focus depends on the focal length and focal ratio of the scope (amongst other attributes).

For seeing close objects like planets you get a sharper, higher contrast view from longer focal lengths and higher focal ratios (e.g. an f-12 Maksutov with 1500mm focal length). For seeing objects deeper into space, a low focal ratio and wider aperture is more important (e.g. f-5 dobsonian with 16" aperture).

To "enlarge" what you see in the scope we use eyepieces of different focal lengths and magnifications. Magnification is given by scope focal length divided by eyepiece length. So a fl=1000mm scope with a 10mm eyepiece will magnify 100x. We also use barlow lenses typically 2x and 3x to further multiply the magnification factor. How far you can go with magnification depends on the atmospheric transparency and how "clear" the weather is - what we call "the seeing".

When it comes to photography however, this is mostly done at the prime focus of the telescope, and you are looking for a scope that focuses two or more wavelengths of light at the same focal point to achieve good colour. Also desireable is as flat a field as possible, little or no chromatic aberation, and coma free. Then it comes down to image scale and how many pixels are used to record the photons of light being captured by the camera. Telescopes with lower focal ratios will gather light faster than those with longer focal ratios - amateur astro imaging tends to be done around f-5, preferably with the clarity/contrast provided by refractors, though some use reflectors as well. The focal ratio determines how long it takes to capture an image, lower fr = faster capture and requires lower exposure times. Magnifying adaptors are sometimes, but rarely, used.

I would recommend a good read of AP imaging principles before getting a scope/camera combination. And do go along to your local astro soc where you'll get loads of advice and see examples of equipment used for both observing and imaging. A good book for amateur AP is "Making Every Photon Count" by Steve Richards. :)

Edited by brantuk
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10 hours ago, Paboy46 said:

Hi everyone. I own an original starseeker 130 from orion that I had for years now .it's ok but doesn't have the power I'm looking for. I'm looking for a telescope that brings deep sky objects close and wanted to start astrophotography .ive been deciding what to get for month's now and its confusing to me. I was thinking about a orion sirius 8 inch or 10 inch atlas. I wanted to get a canon T6 Eos camera for photos. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated 

Please be aware that the SuperWASP professional sky survey which imaged hundreds of thousands of stars in a search for exoplanets used 135mm lenses. So don't assume that you need a 10" aperture for deep sky astrophotography.  Evidently many amateur astrophotographers  use something like a 80mm apochromatic, so hold on buying the big reflector.

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Hi Paboy.

I would echo the comments above - big does not necessarily mean better and certainly does not mean easier.

Many DSOs (especially nebulae) are extensive - check out the imaging deep sky board and see how many 'mosaics' are produced to capture an object. Bigger telescopes result in smaller fov, exaserbating the problem. Yes, big telescopes can produce a bigger image on the chip, but along with that goes the problem of increased guiding accuracy - made doubly difficult because a big telescope weighs more and puts more strain on the guiding system.

For visual, I am not going to deny that a big dob goes a long way to ticking all the boxes, but there is a reason so many of the good imagers on the forum use a small, well corrected refractor with what may seem like an 'overkill' mount.

+1 for Making Every Photon Count - in the end it will save you a lot of money and heartache.

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I am new to this as well. I m looking at different types of scopes, but there are so many to chose from. Any recommendations? I m on the same boat as vacuum and would like to get a scope that will cost a little more now, but will last for years. I don t want to get a average scope, and have to get a better one within a year or so.

 

I am mostly interested in seeing moon crates, saturn rings, cloud bands of jupiter, and some other galaxies. My budget is between 1 and 2K.

I m looking at a few different scopes out there: celestron vx8" schmidt cassegrain,  celestron nexstar 8se computerized, skywatcher pro ed 100mm doublet apo refractor, and the skywatcher goto collapssable dobsonian 10".

 

My first thought was to get the 10 inch scope since it has the biggest aperture. However, i learned that the focal ration a f/5i.  would it be better to see deep sky objects instead of saturn, moon and galaxies?

 

i appreciate any recommendations.

 

Thanks

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I have no regrets about buying my Skywatcher Skyliner 250PX collapsable Dob. The base has a diameter of 53cm, so you have to use a "wide knee waddle" to get it through narrow doorways and over steps. I like the Synscan system, as long as you do not accept a suggested alignment star obscured by a roof, fence, or tree (I now have a table of most suitable bright alignment stars for each month). The 10" mirror works well with most objects, although the Moon is a bit bright. My Skymax 127 Mak is slightly faster to get out and set up, but the Skyliner certainly has the edge when looking at dimmer objects.

Geoff 

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