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25585

75 to 90mm refractors as good as TV76, but cheaper

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I would like a Tele Vue 76 or 85 but both are too expensive new. Purpose is both spotting and travel astro. The construction needs to be shock resistant, OTA not too long, and gas low light scatter, little or no chromatic aberration, and good contrast.

Can anyone recommend such an instrument? The Esprit 80 had crossed my mind, but its a bit heavy, though solidly built. Any others?

 

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11 minutes ago, 25585 said:

I would like a Tele Vue 76 or 85 but both are too expensive new. Purpose is both spotting and travel astro. The construction needs to be shock resistant, OTA not too long, and gas low light scatter, little or no chromatic aberration, and good contrast.

Can anyone recommend such an instrument? The Esprit 80 had crossed my mind, but its a bit heavy, though solidly built. Any others?

 

The equinox 80 is also a very good scope..... I had one for quite some time, it was very impressive ?

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Equinox 80 would be cool, as it has a retractable dew shield.

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28 minutes ago, 25585 said:

 

I would like a Tele Vue 76 or 85 but both are too expensive new.

 

Buy a used one then! They are built to last several lifetimes and be serviceable, used prices are much more attractive on TV scopes.

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Skywatcher ED80, explore scientific Ed triplet, and the Skywatcher equinox ed80 are the budget options that spring to mind.

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Oh, and the Ascension ED80 Triplet stocked by Opticstar looks like good value. this is the only triplet I've owned and the stars were razor sharp.

 

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The Equinox is certainly built to last. Great travel scope too. Sliding dew shield. Excellent colour correction, marginally behind the TV-85 - though it's only one fifth the price.

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