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andyo

flaming star nebula(IC405)

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15 minutes ago, ampleamp said:

If I may add one thing re magenta stars; my normal first try method now is to invert the image and use scnr at around 0.9. Inverting the image turns the magenta stars green which is where scnr kicks in. Simply then reinvert the image.

That's a really cunning plan Alistair.  I've never come across this. Very cunning!

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59 minutes ago, ampleamp said:

Don’t you two think you are having your own conversation here as I am taking notes every step of the way ?, and I’m sure I am not alone!

Thank you both for a very informative read so far and especially to Barry for his hints and tweaks, some of which never even occurred to me, such as reducing background sky saturation with curves - I have only ever darkened the sky slightly with rgb/k so definitely one for me to try. 

If I may add one thing re magenta stars; my normal first try method now is to invert the image and use scnr at around 0.9. Inverting the image turns the magenta stars green which is where scnr kicks in. Simply then reinvert the image. This isn’t as sophisticated as the formula (which I do use as well) but usually gives a pleasing result. 

Thanks to both again. 

Pleased to see others are benefiting from this post as they are very useful hints and tips from Barry which really help you get the best from your hard earned data. 

That is another interesting tip regarding the magenta stars will have a look at that thanks.

Ok below is the result of using Alistairs scnr on an inverted image to reduce the magenta on the stars, looks like its done a good job nice tip.

5a966f0f63d7c_Flamingstarnabulausingscnrtoreducemagentastars.thumb.jpg.70ee58995050e3a7a3e8b0793623f7c5.jpg

 

Edited by andyo

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12 hours ago, Barry-Wilson said:

Hi Andy

Looking very good & certainly much improved.

To help the background colour there are a couple of simply options:

1. Carry out a further DBE using a few samples, eg 6 or 7 across the background sky.

2. Extract the luminance and using that as a mask, protect the nebula and stars, and the reduce the saturation of the unprotected background sky using Curves.  You may need to invert the mask afterwards to boost the saturation of the nebula.

Barry

Hi Barry 

I used the DBE method to help balance the background colour and find that this has done an excellent job. Again I will await your input for the next step

5a967451eb6f6_Flamingstarnebulanarrowband(IC405)December2017.thumb.jpg.7f5f47a2d46d6991efadb37fef64f155.jpg

 

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30 minutes ago, andyo said:

Pleased to see others are benefiting from this post

We may remain silent but I know that I for one get the greatest value from this forum in the constructive criticism that I and others get, along with the helpful suggestions for how to improve our processing.  This image is now looking great.

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On 25/02/2018 at 22:31, Barry-Wilson said:

Hi Andy

Last post before bed :happy10:.

There is a downloadable process for removing magenta stars (it’s a Pixel Math formula). Do a Google search and then download it. You can the use it by using the Favourites menu.

Star reduction will take some time to explain & I don’t have time now. A star mask which encompasses stars of all sizes is key.

Then we can look at special masks to assist colour boosting and LHE.

TTFN

Hi Barry I tried some gentle star reduction using a few iterations of Martin B technique using the minimum filter on a star mask and then edit fade in PS. How does it look to you better or can you see any artefacts such as dark halos surrounding the stars

5a9853c2267dd_flamingstarafterstarreduction.thumb.jpg.a06a053a28f4ce74069120f962a746ba.jpg

Edited by andyo
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Blimey chaps! You are really creating a masterpiece. It is fascinating to see how the processing, err process, works.

Great image btw.

Paul

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Amazing difference. Makes me realise that I don’t understand about 90% of it though. 

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Sorry Andy for the absence - work & Devon weather at the moment!

More time tomorrow for a study and think.  Looking very good . . .

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3 hours ago, Paul73 said:

Blimey chaps! You are really creating a masterpiece. It is fascinating to see how the processing, err process, works.

Great image btw.

Paul

Amazing difference. Makes me realise that I don’t understand about 90% of it though.

 

Thanks guys getting the best out of this data is all down to Barry who has given excellent guidance regarding the processing 

Edited by andyo
wrong quote inserted

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4 minutes ago, Barry-Wilson said:

Sorry Andy for the absence - work & Devon weather at the moment!

More time tomorrow for a study and think.  Looking very good . . .

Thanks Barry. Yes know what you mean but just the weather here as not been able to get into work due to road closures there is just no way in,even the boss couldn't get in today.

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Hi Andy

I think one of the key processing disciplines to develop is to know/recognise when to stop :happy10:.  Your image needs one final step IMHO before you stop.  That is some NR for chrominance noise - the colour data is quite speckled.

For this type of NR I use either TGVDenoise in CieLab mode or Multiscale Linear Transformation in Chrominance mode.  Do you know how to use either of these tools, including support luminance masks?

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3 hours ago, Barry-Wilson said:

Hi Andy

I think one of the key processing disciplines to develop is to know/recognise when to stop :happy10:.  Your image needs one final step IMHO before you stop.  That is some NR for chrominance noise - the colour data is quite speckled.

For this type of NR I use either TGVDenoise in CieLab mode or Multiscale Linear Transformation in Chrominance mode.  Do you know how to use either of these tools, including support luminance masks?

Hi Barry I use noiseware (imagenomic) which I have as a plug in for PS it is an excellent bit of software that allows me to reduce the noise in luminance, chrominance or both giving slider controls for both adjustments. It also allows for me to set the amount of noise present for it to deal with. I have had a go with this and posted the result below to see what you think. Can reduce it further or less but I felt this was about right.

5a999db2e9f54_flamingstarafterstarandnoisereduction.thumb.jpg.6838be9923f4dac85be76d41beed9fec.jpg

 

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Top notch Andy.

Now is the time to stop and take a step back and reflect on your progress across the last few days and changed workflow.

An excellent Flaming Star Sir :headbang:.

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2 minutes ago, Barry-Wilson said:

Top notch Andy.

Now is the time to stop and take a step back and reflect on your progress across the last few days and changed workflow.

An excellent Flaming Star Sir :headbang:.

Thanks Barry your help and time has been very much appreciated. I feel that i have learnt a huge amount from your help here, which really shows in the finished image, wow! what a difference. I have copied and pasted your advice from this post into a document as my blueprint for future processing in narrowband. I believe large parts of the workflow could be transferred to RGB or HaRGB images also. Once again Barry thank you very much.:happy7:

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Looks gaseous--like a nebula, even in narrowband.  This target often looks sculpted--like an object--clay or metal.  You have  great image here.

Rodd.  

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7 hours ago, Rodd said:

Looks gaseous--like a nebula, even in narrowband.  This target often looks sculpted--like an object--clay or metal.  You have  great image here.

Rodd.  

Thanks Rodd

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