Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_constellations.thumb.jpg.6034fe99df7fe590f77a776877551964.jpg

alan potts

Connection to house

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Jkulin said:

I run Cat 5 to my pier and that then connects through a socket in my lean-to shed, which on the other side has a router for connection to our TV equipment and then runs around the outside of the home along the damp course into my office where my server is, altogether about 100 ft and it is perfect.

I did try Wi-Fi and repeaters but the signal was so temperamental that running a cable was the simplest solution.

Agreed running a cable sounds best it is just difficult for me to hide it I have a massive amount of concrete between me and the obsey, so airborn may be the only way. Still that is a good few ideas for me to kick around once the snow has cleared off, minus 24 last night.

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With those sort of temperatures makes sure you get insulated cable, it's not too much of a problem if they are static, but I roll mine away at the end of each night so they do stiffen up.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a permanent above-ground cable run I'd probably use a support wire strung between buildings or poles and use that to support the data cable.  Use a cable designed for outdoor use.  Many indoor network cables do not have UV-stable sheathing.

These days I very rarely run a single cable anywhere.  Two makes life easier if one fails or you have some other problem.

Oh, if you're running enough cable it's often cheaper to buy it as a reel, too.  Every time we've had the floors up to get at wiring or plumbing here I've dropped more network cable in (solid stone walls make for poor wifi signals).  I reckon I probably have half a kilometre of network cable terminating in our cellar now (where I am about to plug it all into a switch).

James

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree with the support wire and UV resistant cabling. I would future proof and go for Cat 6 cable. cost wise, not much more than Cat 5 these days.

Steve

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a fair while now since I had to worry about this stuff for anything other than my own house, but as far as I recall to have a "cat 6 compliant" installation, you have to meet all sorts of other requirements such as minimum bend radius, not untwisting the conductors, maximum length of sheath that can be stripped and so on.  The plugs are different too, because alternate wires are offset from each other inside the plug, though that's no big deal unless you're making up your own cables (which I usually do).  There's a reduced cable length limit for speeds above what could be carried on cat5e too, I think.  And I think there's some requirement for earthing at both ends, which might be interesting from an electrical point of view (for example what happens if both ends aren't at the same earth potential?).

For those reasons I've never bothered with cat6.  If you foresee a future need for a 10Gb/s network, perhaps it's worth it.

I have a need to run a network connection to outbuildings at some point.  I'm pondering the idea of using fibre instead of copper, but if I do that it will be in a duct in a trench rather than overhead.

James

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, JamesF said:

It's a fair while now since I had to worry about this stuff for anything other than my own house, but as far as I recall to have a "cat 6 compliant" installation, you have to meet all sorts of other requirements such as minimum bend radius, not untwisting the conductors, maximum length of sheath that can be stripped and so on.  The plugs are different too, because alternate wires are offset from each other inside the plug, though that's no big deal unless you're making up your own cables (which I usually do).  There's a reduced cable length limit for speeds above what could be carried on cat5e too, I think.  And I think there's some requirement for earthing at both ends, which might be interesting from an electrical point of view (for example what happens if both ends aren't at the same earth potential?).

For those reasons I've never bothered with cat6.  If you foresee a future need for a 10Gb/s network, perhaps it's worth it.

I have a need to run a network connection to outbuildings at some point.  I'm pondering the idea of using fibre instead of copper, but if I do that it will be in a duct in a trench rather than overhead.

James

James,

i have a very good friend that is a IT expert out here so I am sure he can get me the cable and probably help out though many a time he comes to see me and gets dragged away by someone for his skills. You are not going to see those network speeds here with a telescope, my internet is about 1mb/s though maybe you don't actually mean that. Still plenty of things here that have been suggested that I can think about.

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 01/03/2018 at 16:19, alan potts said:

Agreed running a cable sounds best it is just difficult for me to hide it I have a massive amount of concrete between me and the obsey, so airborn may be the only way. Still that is a good few ideas for me to kick around once the snow has cleared off, minus 24 last night.

Alan

Why you think of ground only? ;) go up the fence if possible!
I use Team Viewer from work to connect to my Home PC, and I totaly hate it... slow... Some programs do not represent pictures properly....

Four 15metre USB cables are cheaper and faster than one Notebook on Team Viewer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roland,

Surprised to hear your issues with Teamviewer...

I have an ol' Win7 laptop in the observatory, 30m of Cat5 back to the home office and can easily and effectively work with the home Win10 system. No issues, no drama.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Devlo Powerline units. One in my shed and one in the house connected to my router. I sit in my warm living room, watching TV and chatting wit my wife while keeping an eye on my laptop screen Teamviewer to see how my images are downloading from my scope to my laptop in the shed. 

Something similar to this  - Powerline Starter kit

There are faster units at cost.

But they are great. No CAT5 etc. As long as the sheds power comes from your house junction box, you should be OK. 

I setup this way with my Devlo units : - Inset the main using into a wall power socket next to your router. Put a short CAT5 cable from that unit to your router. Plug the other unit into the power socket in the shed with your computer that controls the scope. Put a Cat5 cable from computer into that second unit, else use WiFi to connect to it. Back in the house, press the little button on the unit to have it search. Then outside to shed, press button on unit in shed within 2 minutes!. Hey presto, We have internet in the shed. Sorted :)

Hope this helps....Also save drilling holes ;)

 

Good luck.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Star101 said:

I use Devlo Powerline units. One in my shed and one in the house connected to my router. I sit in my warm living room, watching TV and chatting wit my wife while keeping an eye on my laptop screen Teamviewer to see how my images are downloading from my scope to my laptop in the shed. 

Something similar to this  - Powerline Starter kit

There are faster units at cost.

But they are great. No CAT5 etc. As long as the sheds power comes from your house junction box, you should be OK. 

I setup this way with my Devlo units : - Inset the main using into a wall power socket next to your router. Put a short CAT5 cable from that unit to your router. Plug the other unit into the power socket in the shed with your computer that controls the scope. Put a Cat5 cable from computer into that second unit, else use WiFi to connect to it. Back in the house, press the little button on the unit to have it search. Then outside to shed, press button on unit in shed within 2 minutes!. Hey presto, We have internet in the shed. Sorted :)

Hope this helps....Also save drilling holes ;)

 

Good luck.

Need to check this out with a quilified person, this is Bulgaria and the power system whilst done correctly is completely different to thre way we do this in UK. Power to the obsey goes through two other fuse boards before it goes out into the obsey, all that is of course underground and about 50m of cables altogether. I do have an IT mate to ask about this and will.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I am in UK and run mine in similar way as Alan Potts, using Netgear Powerline adapters through the mains cable. Goes through fuse in summer house without any problems. Control with Teamviewer. Takes 10 mins to get set up in the dome then come in doors to operate and keep an eye on things.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks to all that took time to make suggestions and try to help.

I had a drink with my IT mate who really is excellent, well at least he impresses me. He told me due to the construction of my house and something to do with the resonant fequency of plaster board and stone walls many of these items were a waste of time for me and would break after 3-5 years anyway maybe soon due to the massive temperature range here -26ish to +41ish. The plug in system that uses the power cables are a none starter for many reason here, mainly due to the less than brilliant power supply.

So it's cable laying time, that he said here is much quicker and will last much longer and can be set up to work in seconds, it's also cheapest as it's made here by ABB cables, you may even have it in your own systems somewhere.

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a simple note that the latest version of Teanviewer free edition now allows peer to peer connection via LAN or Wifi and does not require internet if you so choose. It all happens locally and not on far away servers which introduces delays or dropouts.

The new GUI is quite good and simple and it handles all the handshaking. Only Windows 10 pro version allows Remote Desktop control. Home version has only connectivity but not control.

Can't wait for a clear night to test the new found wire free session. Everything works find in room to room wifi connection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2018-03-01 at 11:15, alan potts said:

I would need to get top advice on this, it is Bulgaria we are talking about here, though my system was done by someone that knows what he's doing, the trouble is he is close to 70 now and my not be up on such systems.

Alan

These are not complicated, and I am sure are available in Bulgaria

https://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/d-link-refurbished-dhp-309avre-powerline-av500-network-kit/6000195966809?cmpid=sem_pla_google_en_none_6000195966809_1000320038305526000189936486_1282&cmpid=sem_pla_google_en_none_869128514_43896172956_None&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIovLDkPiR2gIVBlgNCh0XbwKkEAYYASABEgI3P_D_BwE

 

You connect one to your internet router in the house using an ethernet cable and plug into power in the house, the second goes in your observatory.

Key things to remember is plug directly into power, do not use a power bar. The only time I have seen this not work is when a second fuse panel was installed in an older house and created two separate power circuits in the house

 

M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, nucdoc said:

These are not complicated, and I am sure are available in Bulgaria

https://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/d-link-refurbished-dhp-309avre-powerline-av500-network-kit/6000195966809?cmpid=sem_pla_google_en_none_6000195966809_1000320038305526000189936486_1282&cmpid=sem_pla_google_en_none_869128514_43896172956_None&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIovLDkPiR2gIVBlgNCh0XbwKkEAYYASABEgI3P_D_BwE

 

You connect one to your internet router in the house using an ethernet cable and plug into power in the house, the second goes in your observatory.

Key things to remember is plug directly into power, do not use a power bar. The only time I have seen this not work is when a second fuse panel was installed in an older house and created two separate power circuits in the house

 

M

I have a very good friend here that is an IT expert and he has told me cable is the best way by far for a whole load of reasons, not the easiest but the fastest, I also using this system have to go through two fuse boards before it gets to the observatory so maybe there lies another problem. Interesingly one of the black marks he said against it was temperature range here minus 30 to plus 42, no good for the electronics, though I also would not think it would do cable much good.

Alan 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been remotely accessing & controlling my setup from the house over Wi-Fi for a while now. The distance between the AP and scope PC is about 15m. I used to use team viewer but this started to demand a commercial licence and so I moved to MS Remote Desktop and this works a treat. The Wi-Fi connection has been much improved since I ditched the AP/extender combo and got myself a mesh Wi-Fi network, this works really well so far 😁

HTH, Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve been using TeamViewer over a Cat5 cable to the observatory for almost ten years. No issues, no drama.

If you’re using TeamViewer as an individual there is no commercial license required.

I’m using the the latest V13 with no issues.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been thinking about this too, though yet to do anything about it - was thinking of using teamviewer from my laptop to a tablet so I can obsess about my guiding in comfort rather than trekking outside every advert break.

I image from a completely no-wifi, ethernet, nothing site though (rural Spain), so was thinking of making one of the devices a wifi mobile hotspot and having the other link to it - maybe that would work for you too ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.