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Saganite

Hyginus Rille

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I set up my big refractor, Andromeda, for an evening of relaxing Moon gazing and to try out a couple of pairs of eyepieces in my bino. I started with my favourites, 24 & 19 Pans and spent more than an hour just revelling in the sharpness and the clarity of the expansive views that these deliver. The 19 mm Pans ,giving 100x, were my favourites on this outing, showing me the whole globe rich in detail, from pole to pole without need to re focus, and coupled with  lots of warm clothing, and an old EQ6 tracking doggedly, I was able to just sit and soak it all up. The desire not to change anything was strong, but I had wanted to try my newly acquired 13mm Naglers for a longer time than I had thus far managed, so they were next into the bino, and more of the same comfortable enjoyment followed, but at 146X , and it was a tad more engrossing as the increase in power had not caused the view to deteriorate at all, the view was still stable. I was able to see not only the lunar V & X, but the small craters that are punched into their shapes.

I decided to take a look at the Hyginus Rille, with the interesting Hyginus at the intersection. This crater is one of a handful thought not to have been formed by impact, as it does not have a raised rim, but to be of  volcanic origin, possibly a Caldera. I raised the power to 190X with a couple of 10mm eyepieces, and seeing some detail in the Rilles, I pushed my luck and raised it to 272X with my pair of MRG 7mm units. Amazingly the surface was still fairly stable, but I had reached my limit at 'native focus' and without fiddling with the bino and using the various OCS options, which I definitely did not wish to do, I could not explore the possibilities any further.I could see  what I thought were craterlets in the Rilles ( I counted  seven maybe 8 of the larger ones, but there are more than 20), and became quite absorbed. 

I later discovered that they are in fact ' collapse pits' in the 3km wide flat -floored Rilles, a feature well known to geologists here on Earth, that form where sub- surface lava flows.

This crater was one of a number thought to exhibit the TLP ( Transient Lunar Phenomena), such as gas venting.

My intention when I set up my scope some 4 hours earlier was to have a look around at well known ' friends' in the night sky, but  ultimately,I could not drag myself away from Luna tonight. :happy11:

Edited by Saganite
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Lovely report Steve. We were looking at similar areas last night in the Tak. Not so much detail as you were getting, but really nice views of rilles around Triesnecker too, @PeterW was showing me around :). Pic from MoonMap Pro really shows what you were describing about Hyginus

IMG_7164.PNG

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Very nice binoview, even if the seeing was a little wobbly at times. I like the triesneker rilles. Tried for the Hadley Rilke, but it was still deep in shadow when we looked.

Peter

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I was really quite surprised how good the seeing was, as lately I have made do with 80X to 120X. I must say that the Meade 7's are very good, although they were the only units for which I had to adjust the bino to achieve a single image, not much though. I look forward now to Plato craterlets.:grin:

Thanks for the map Stu.

Edited by Saganite
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Nice report. :) I was imaging the moon with my ZWO for the first time last night, so only  looked at the moon through a medium power EP, so never noticed the Hyginus rille when looking through the scope, but did manage to catch it well in the images I took. Think this is the first time I have noticed it. 

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37 minutes ago, Saganite said:

I was really quite surprised how good the seeing was, as lately I have made do with 80X to 120X. I must say that the Meade 7's are very good, although they were the only units for which I had to adjust the bino to achieve a single image, not much though. I look forward now to Plato craterlets.:grin:

Thanks for the map Stu.

Glad the 7s are working out Steve. As you know I couldn't get them to merge so I'm pleased we selected the closest match for yours to make the pair. Higher power is always more difficult to merge but as long as you can, all is good!

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