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M81 and M82 LHaRGB data captured between 9-13 February 2018. 12x10 min (2 hours) each HaRGB; 24x10 min (4 hours) L for a total of 12 hours.

5a8da3187e18e_M81M82_LHaRGB(FM)-IFN.thumb.jpg.bea666c3c8c2c15de5a9317ae83aae28.jpg

Maybe I overstretched the luminance trying to get at the IFN, which is barely visible - at least I'm trying to convince myself that a hint of it's in there....!!

Edited by geoflewis
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4 minutes ago, Peco4321 said:

That's a cracking image. Beautiful target. 

Thanks Peter, your feedback is much appreciated.

Cheers, Geof

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1 minute ago, bob-c said:

very nice .

              bob.

Thanks Bob,

Geof

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4 hours ago, Victor Boesen said:

The IFN is indeed visible. Great capture!

Hi Victor, thanks for your confirmation. Regards, Geof

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2 hours ago, Whistlin Bob said:

Lovely image- wonderful delicate structure on M81.

Go on.... what's IFN?

Thanks Bob, I appreciate the comments.

The faint smudges around both galaxies, but most noticable around M81, are what is known as the Integrated Flux Nebula (IFN). IFN are galactic latitude nebulae which lie beyond the main body of our Milk Way galaxy, being illuminated not by a single star (as most nebula in the plane of the Galaxy are) but by the energy from the integrated flux of all the stars in the Milky Way. These nebulae clouds, an important component of the interstellar medium, are composed of dust particles, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and other elements (source Wikipedia).

I hope that helps. Actually this whole region shows a lot of IFN in deeper exposures, or better processed data, so it's worth looking at better images than mine :happy7:

Regards, Geof

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Nicely done, I think there is some IFN there, or in keeping with the competition theme, it could be exhaust gases from the Millennium Falcon...:icon_biggrin:

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19 minutes ago, tomato said:

Nicely done, I think there is some IFN there, or in keeping with the competition theme, it could be exhaust gases from the Millennium Falcon...:icon_biggrin:

Now there's a thought.... :icon_biggrin:, thanks for the feedback

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9 hours ago, geoflewis said:

I hope that helps....

Thanks Geoff- yes it does. I was drawn to this hobby by the beauty of the images, but keep finding myself accidently learning more about the theory and loving it (well, the bits I can understand anyway). Who would have thought you could sit in Norfolk as an amateur and image interstellar dust and Millennium Falcon exhaust gasses!!!?

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2 minutes ago, Whistlin Bob said:

Who would have thought you could sit in Norfolk as an amateur and image interstellar dust and Millennium Falcon exhaust gasses!!!?

Feeling the Force.... :wink2:

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On 3/4/2018 at 06:29, geoflewis said:

The faint smudges around both galaxies, but most noticable around M81, are what is known as the Integrated Flux Nebula (IFN)

That's awesome. I was wondering what those smudges might have been before scrolling down. Great work!!

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29 minutes ago, RJ901 said:

That's awesome. I was wondering what those smudges might have been before scrolling down. Great work!!

Thanks RJ901. With 12 hours of data I knew that there should be some in there somewhere but I found it very difficult to get at it. A method that I use to see what might be lurking in my images is the Equalize function in PS, which performs an horrendous stretch, also exacerbating any noise, but the structure of IFN all over this region can then be more clearly seen as in this luminence only data from my image.

5a9f15dbcf879_M81M82_Lum(FM)_PS(Equalize).thumb.jpg.3d8a699b0af480c906e7cd89acc2eac7.jpg

The challenge for me is to find a better way to reveal the IFN without the noise; my processing skills aren't there yet.... The squiggly loop of IFN just to the right of M81 is known as Arp's Loop, which I did just get to show in my finished LHaRGB image.

Regards, Geof

Edited by geoflewis

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