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NGC3941 New Supernova in Ursa Major SN2018pv


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Magnitude 12.7 supernova ( 2018pv ) found in NGC3941

 

2018pv (= AT2018pu), TNS discovered 2018/02/03.631 by Masaki Tsuboi 
Found in NGC 3941 at R.A. = 11h52m55s.700, Decl. = +36°59'11".60 
Located 4".1 east and 0".8 north of the center of NGC 3941 (K. Itagaki image) (Giancarlo Cortini image) (K. Itagaki image) (Manfred Mrotzek image) (K. Itagaki image
Mag 12.7:2/9, Type Ia (z=0.003100) (References: ATEL 11278)

 

data from

http://www.rochesterastronomy.org/supernova.html#2018pv

Edited by alanjgreen
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Well spotted. Well placed and bright! AND a clear forecast fit tomorrow!

Can you sign up for updates? Pop onto the site now and again to see if anything is happening, but these are generally short lived events.

Paul

 

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2 minutes ago, Paul73 said:

Well spotted. Well placed and bright! AND a clear forecast fit tomorrow!

Can you sign up for updates? Pop onto the site now and again to see if anything is happening, but these are generally short lived events.

Paul

 

Type 1a supernova should be good for a couple of months

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This photo by G. Cortini shows it very close to the centre of the galaxy, and possibly still brightening ?

https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?depth=1&hl=en&prev=search&rurl=translate.google.co.uk&sl=es&sp=nmt4&u=http://www.astronomerstelegram.org/%3Fread%3D11278&usg=ALkJrhgUV0n2_Q_3yKm38uYZLCcSFZqdqA

andrew

NGC 3941 + 2018 pv

 

 

Edited by andrew63
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Not sure re the brightening bit? It seems to have been lurking at approx mag 12 to 12.5 for about a week.

Hope that it stays around for a clear spell without a moon......

SN 2018pv

Image by Super Nova Hunter extraordinaire, Mr Itagaki.

 

Paul

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So who has observed this one? 

Alan, Jon and I managed to get it from our respective back gardens last night.

Well worth a go if you are in the area.

A star exploding with such power that it outshines its host galaxy.

If that ain’t worth a look, I don’t know what is!

Paul

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1 hour ago, Paul73 said:

So who has observed this one? 

Alan, Jon and I managed to get it from our respective back gardens last night.

Well worth a go if you are in the area.

A star exploding with such power that it outshines its host galaxy.

If that ain’t worth a look, I don’t know what is!

Paul

And this explosion actually happened 83 million years ago! 

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I observed the SN twice this past week from my backyard in southeast Pennsylvania. Skies here are okay, though not like some of my darker sites I drive to north of us.

First night was just using my 102mm f/6.5 refractor, and the supernova (at or near maximum) was quite easy.
Second night was this past Friday and this time with my 208mm f/3.9 newt the SN was very bright, and seem to overwhelm much of the galaxy.

Would have loved to taken one of my big guns (22" f/4.5 or 12.5" f/4.8 dobs, 8" f/9 refractor), but my van was in the shop for repairs. Now weather forecast here are bad for the next week. Even got 6" of snow last night.

I should add that two of my club (Chesmont Astronomical Society) members viewed the SN last Monday from one of our best dark sites. Using 22" f/3.6 and 25" f/4 dobs they said the SN was blazing. In fact the owner of the 25" said it was his favorite SN since the one in Messier 82 a couple years ago.  
    
 

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