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Registax 6 Lunar Ghost Images


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Hello,

I am new to Registax 6.  Tried stacking lunar eclipse photos (used JPG images, could not get right exposure with video).  Used stock settings and reduced points to only 40.  I keep getting ghost images after stacking.

What can I do to eliminate this?

Thank You,
Michal

Stack 001.jpg

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Hello

In Registax 6 you can use in "Alignment Setup" the function "Align by centre of gravity"

You have a cross and click on it just one time. After click on button "Align".

Clear skies.

Luc

Edited by CATLUC
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Hmmm.....still having issues.  Tried the alignment setup in Registax and tried Autostakkert (image attached). Neither worked.  I suspect it is the dim areas / lack of contrast in the lunar totality image that is causing problems.  I will need to investigate my settings further.

Proc Tota_g4_ap226.tif

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I think you may be right when you say lack of contrast - most stackers need some definite "marks" to stack on.  When stacking full disc solar images (JPEG's from a DSLR camera) I use PIPP to centre and crop the images and then Registax 5 (not 6) to stack.  The trick for such low contrast, featureless images seems to be to use a single large align point and place it so there is a decent amount of border of the disc within the align box - Something like this:

Capture.JPG.ac826512fb94be5182047f363263e046.JPG

I can usually "persuade" it to stack with this technique.

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