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mikey2000

EQ6-R owners club

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57 minutes ago, AKB said:

...with a keyboard command from within Stellarium??

If, how, please?

Tony

CTRL-SHIFT-1 all at the same time syncs for me using the 0.19.3 with direct ASCOM.  CTRL-3 was the stellarium scope equivalent.

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On 19/12/2019 at 09:17, Robny said:

Just an update to this, I DID do the firmware update for my motors and they certainly sound different, not had opportunity yet to try it out, but as the noise goes......it sounds promising.

Does updating firmware help/is needed when driving through ASCOM too?

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I am a new member of the family now.  I had to send mine back today though.  SAD.. I had a bad error with guiding.  So another is on its way and then going on a road trip for a week under BORTLE one skies!!!  I do love the mount. I have just spent th last hour reading this thread. 

From what I gathered...

1. I need to update the firmware

2. I already used EQMOD successfully with it (without the HC and using 0.5 to guide)

3. This is not an UNcommon but not common issue. ( I pray it doesn't happen to me again)...  I may need to learn eqpec training. I am not permanent so i hope not)~

4.  WE LOVE OUR EQ6-r mounts.....  Did I miss anything??

 

Thank you for having me..... Dawn in Indiana US

Screen Shot 2020-02-29 at 11.12.25 PM.png

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I have the newest version of stellarium now synced perfect with my EQ6R Pro. I leave the handset at home, set up from the home position. Polar align in Sharpcap.  Turn on the scope after alignment, Start stellarium and it automatically turns on EQMOD. I slew to 2 stars, center each target, hit CTRL SHIFT 1 to center on each star and then I am good all night. EASY EASY EASY. I UNINSTALLED stellariumscope and all issues went away. BTW I connect directly from the mount head to my laptop with a regular printer cable (usb on one side and printer type hook up on the scope side. Paid 9 dollars for a really nice 10 foot one here   https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07M9J4CYH/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1

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Thought I'd add my guiding numbers to the knowledge base - had the mount for a couple of months now - conditions were calm last night and I saw the graph consistently between 0.5-0.6" RMS. I've been hapily guiding with 3 - 4 second exposures. 

 

EQ6Rguiding.PNG

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Looks good, but that being said, the numbers don't say everything, guiding results trough a 250mm FL guidescope won't be the same as at 800-1000mm FL trough a OAG.

At least, that what iv'e heard and experienced 🙂

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5 hours ago, Miguel1983 said:

Looks good, but that being said, the numbers don't say everything, guiding results trough a 250mm FL guidescope won't be the same as at 800-1000mm FL trough a OAG.

At least, that what iv'e heard and experienced 🙂

Interesting, what was the difference in your experience? I'm using an OAG at 800mm

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6 hours ago, SamAndrew said:

Interesting, what was the difference in your experience? I'm using an OAG at 800mm

Typically i have an RMS ranging from 0.5 to 0.7", when i was guiding with a guidescope this was much lower, as low as 0,1".

It's quite logical, guiding errors are going to be magnified proportional with the guidescope focal length, try astrophotography with a C11...

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Are you quoting your guide error RMS in arcseconds, or pixels, as PHD displays both.  I always use arcseconds as it is the same unit in all cases, while pixels depend on individual setups.  I have also found my guiding accuracy actually improved when using my C11/OAG when compared to my ED80 with guide scope.  My typical guiding with the guide-scope (300/60 mm, asi290mm) is around 0.8 arcsec RMS.  When using my C11 + reducer /OAG (1850mm focal length) I get 0.6 rms typical, and as low as 0.4 with good seeing. 

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Just to reiterate, using units of arc-seconds RMS is preferable when quoting guiding accuracy as it is the same for all users and hardware configurations.  Pixels on the other hand are hardware configuration dependent, and explain why you would see numerically larger error on a system where the guide system used a higher image scale (arc seconds per pixel). 

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1 hour ago, f300v10 said:

Just to reiterate, using units of arc-seconds RMS is preferable when quoting guiding accuracy as it is the same for all users and hardware configurations.  Pixels on the other hand are hardware configuration dependent, and explain why you would see numerically larger error on a system where the guide system used a higher image scale (arc seconds per pixel). 

Alright, i'll keep that in mind, thanks for the info

 

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hello all.  read through the pages of WONDERFUL info.

 

cant seem to find Or missed it.~~. any concerns with the 6R not tracking at the zenith?  i did a flip last night on M101 and ( this happened while in texas as well). It would not track.  using EQMOD. with much success on my EQ-G's. and on this mount EXCEPT at the zenith.  the frame and focus platesolv even show trailing.  I did make sure sideral was checked on of course.  

 

then i can also hear it go back and forth and back and forth adjusting slightly after a plate solv. like it corrects. and then Uncorrects persay and fails at 1600 pixels. or 332 pixels etc...  my guiing is awesome at .6-.8 arc seconds.  I LOVE this mount the target is perfect in the middle

 

using a 127mm fract at 952mm with OAG using a 290mini.  LOVE everything but it almost like the clutches cant hold it.  etc.  FINALLY i was able to get it to go at 300 pixel error and it was fine the rest of the night.  IDEAS?

 

dont want to return this if I dont have too

 

Dawn

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, lowry_pt said:

hello all.  read through the pages of WONDERFUL info.

 

cant seem to find Or missed it.~~. any concerns with the 6R not tracking at the zenith?  i did a flip last night on M101 and ( this happened while in texas as well). It would not track.  using EQMOD. with much success on my EQ-G's. and on this mount EXCEPT at the zenith.  the frame and focus platesolv even show trailing.  I did make sure sideral was checked on of course.  

 

then i can also hear it go back and forth and back and forth adjusting slightly after a plate solv. like it corrects. and then Uncorrects persay and fails at 1600 pixels. or 332 pixels etc...  my guiing is awesome at .6-.8 arc seconds.  I LOVE this mount the target is perfect in the middle

 

using a 127mm fract at 952mm with OAG using a 290mini.  LOVE everything but it almost like the clutches cant hold it.  etc.  FINALLY i was able to get it to go at 300 pixel error and it was fine the rest of the night.  IDEAS?

 

dont want to return this if I dont have too

 

Dawn

Dawn,

Do you have limits turned on in EQMOD by chance?  If they are on and default to stop the mount at the zenith that may explain your issue.  If this is the case you can either turn them off (could be dangerous), or set them to allow the mount to go a safe time/distance past the meridian before the limit stops the mount.

Sorry, just noticed you had this issue post flip, not before flip right?  I would still double check your limits aren't set right at zenith. For the plate-solving, make sure you have the EQMOD sync set to 'Dialog mode', not append.

 

Scott

 

Edited by f300v10

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Has anyone come across the following abnormality? I am running the mount through ASCOM EQMOD via "PC Direct" and have been since I bought the scope 14 months or so ago. Tonight I have found myself in a situation where the mount slews to target and then stops tracking. I am using the same power supply that I normally use and it shows 13.4V at the mount, that dips to about 12.2V during the slew. Nevertheless using the same set up I have never had any problems previously.  I read somewhere on this forum that someone had a similar experience some time ago, but not sure if they ever solved such.

If anyone has any ideas I am all ears, I don't want to go down the route of taking it to bits as it still has nearly a years guarantee to run, subsequently if it banjaxed it'll go back to the supplier.

 

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Hello All.  

This is my very first post to stargazers Lounge!  Phew - it is amazing how this forum is buzzing with activity and all the the amazing work  I see here.  I have retired from 20+ years of corporate life at an Aerospace company and decided to teach high school here at Bush School in Seattle, WA. It is an independent school almost founded almost 100 years ago.  In my first year I have taught Mathematics and Computer Science. However, the focus for teaching will be CS, with an experiential bent. My goal is to spark interest in observational astronomy at the school and maybe even start a regular observing program. I have built and used RPIs for my CS classes - in last project the students a digital spectroscope. The image on my icon is the spectrum of mercury obtained from the spectroscopes the students built! 

I have been observational astronomer for a very long time and have used my Celestron NexStar 5 for 2 decades! I proposed that the school purchase a Telescope for their experiential programs.  The school is now a proud owner of a Skywatcher Quattro 8" Newtonian Telescope and a EQ6-R Pro mount.  After much research, I built a RPI 4 system using the INDI/KSTARS/EKOS software to control the mount and for astro photography.  I have obtained a ZWO ASI 224MC as a guide/planetary camera.  The FOV is so small that I have not had much luck with it on the Quattro. Simple things like how to get the star image focused on the 224MC stumps me. I am also struggling with the workflow - what comes first, second etc) for setting up for a night of astro photography.  

I was wondering if I could get some guidance on this.  Maybe there are users here of F4 newts that can give me some tips? My equipment so far - Skywatcher Quattro 8" Newt, EQ6-R Pro Mount, Skywatcher Coma Corrector, an old Rebel XT DSLR, ZWO ASI 224MC Camera for guiding and planeray photos, INDI/EKOS/KSTARS Software on RPI4. I plan to use the finder (9x50) scope of the skywatcher as a guide scope. 

Thank you so much!  Excited to be here.

- dru
 

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Some nice kit! Congrats!  As an observational astronomer, you have a head start as you will have heard a lot of the terminology before...

 

F4 Newts are quite rare.  I had enough money to buy one a few years ago but got nervous and settled for a good old 200PDS - the f5 version of the quattro.  I read a few bits about how hard it is to collimate a F4 newtonian and I'm still a bit new to all this.

So that's Step 1.  Make sure the scope is nicely collimated, to avoid weird star shapes.  Step 1 also includes making sure the coma corrector is spaced exacltly correctly, to ensure round stars across the whole view.  My own corrector needed about 0,5mm of shimming to get it just right across a whole 4/3" sensor.  With a DSLR size sensor, it's even more critical unless you are happy to crop off the edges of each frame.

 

Step 2.  Get your RPI4 talking nicely to the mount, so it can send Slew commands and some kind of sync to a planetarium app. (I use Windows 10 so can't help here.  On Windows EQMOD and Stellarium work nicely for me here)  

 

Step 3.  Get Guiding working.  PHD2 is fine for me on Windows 10 and I believe they have a Linux version.  Without guiding, you will be disappointed in the long run.  The EQ6-R is very guidable (is that a word?) I use a QHY camera with a tiny sensor through the 9x50 with suitable adapter as my guidescope.  Guiding accuracy to 0.5" is easily achievable with this mound if the seeing is good.

 

Step 4.  Get your imaging software working nicely with your camera.  I use APT and it's fine for imaging sessions with a variety of different exposures, filters and even plate solving.

 

Step 4a. Get plate solving working.  Saves a lot of time and you can easily carry on imaging the *exact* same patch of sky night after night.

 

Step 5 Practise processing.  That's even more time consuming!

 

 

So, I spent about six months getting the scope/mount/camera/guiding working all under computer control, but I was new to all this stuff.  You have good kit but might yearn for a proper astro camera instead of a DSLR.

 

That's the basic stuff, the foundations. If they won't work, you'll be scratching your head wondering what to do.  On any particular night, you have a few steps to go through as you pull the rig out of the shed and get ready to go.

 

Step 1:  Plonk the whole rig down in just the right spot, all wired up and powered up.  Hopefully this will be the same spot over and over leading to easy polar alignment.

Step 2: Polar alignment.  Use whatever means you prefer.  On windows 10, SharpCap does the job in minutes.

Step 3. Get an initial alignment using platesolving.  Try to get aligned on a nice bright star near Tonight's Target to allow for focusing.

Step 4: Focusing.  Use a bhatinov mask (google bhatinov mask generator and laser cut one yourself or splash some cash and buy a ready made one).  Sharpcap has a builtin focusing routine that really helps here.  Basically use Live View.

Step 5. Shoot!  Use platesolving to frame the target precisely, start guiding and then get shooting.

 

 

Sounds easy eh?

 

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Dru,

Firstly welcome to the lounge and clear skies. Although I am not a reflecting telescope user it is my understanding that an f4 Newtonian has to collimated quite precisely due to the very steep light cone within the system. I hope I am not endeavouring to teach my grandmother to suck eggs here. There also may be some spacing issues between the camera and the focuser. There are some serious experts on here and I am positive they will be along soon. With regard to the work flow I use propriety software available on line and well tested. The following software may prove useful. Cartes du Ciel a well regarded planetarium program.

https://www.ap-i.net/skychart/en/start

PHD. (Press here Dummy) a guiding program. Where one can set parameters to suit ones guiding individual arrangements/equipment.

https://openphdguiding.org/

Astro-photography tool (APT) Free to try and available for a very small fee that will automatically control a Canon (or Nikon) camera from ones desk top.

https://astrophotography.app/

In order to get the software to work you would also need to have the latest incarnation of ASCOM

https://ascom-standards.org/

And EQMOD “drivers” for your particular mount.

http://eq-mod.sourceforge.net/

For post processing

deepskystacker.free.fr/english/index.html

and:

https://www.gimp.org/

As good as photo shop and free.

 

My work flow is then as follows. (Others may differ)

1)      Polar alignment, get the mount as close as possible to the celestial pole, there are features within PHD (above) to allow one to do so very accurately. Although for a permanent set up drift alignment with the NCP would be the preferred method and is regarded as the “gold standard”.

2)      Start CDC and ensure the screen shows the area around the NCP, you can set parameters within CDC to replicate the “view” that your guide camera and imaging camera replicate.

3)      Connect CDC to the mount, I go via the handset through a USB to serial converter setting the handset to “PC DIRECT”

4)      Start APT and connect the mount and the camera and focuser (if you have one)

 

(note: I feed all the data and photographic streams via a powered USB hub on the telescope dovetail so I only have 2 feeds to the mount, power and data. That is having built a power distribution box that resides again on the dovetail)

 

5)      Start the camera on “live view” via APT, if the alignment is fairly good and dependent on the field of view of the imaging camera you should have Polaris on the screen.

6)      Use the “focus aid” tab to find your best focus ( I focus from my desk top so can utilise the “auto focus” tab). Some people use a “Bahtinov” mask on the front of the telescope; there is a Bahtinov grabber within APT.

7)      Slew to an area of the sky as close to the celestial equator as possible, and then plate solve via APT and the imaging camera; sync the co-ordinates to CDC.

😎      Start the guide camera and ensure that it is focused, ( there is some consideration that a slightly out of  focus star is better)

9)      Calibrate the guiding set up via PHD.

10)  Stop PHD once the calibration is complete and it has started to guide.

11)  Slew to the potential target, plate solve again via APT to centre target.

12)  I tend to do a second calibration via PHD as the guiding parameters can alter dependent upon the altitude and subsequent atmospheric displacement of target object/ mount inconsistencies etc. (As soon as PHD is happy it will start guiding)

13)   Commence imaging run, don’t forget the calibration frames.

 

Enjoy

 

K

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Posted (edited)

Hi @cnarayan and welcome! Your set up is almost identical to my own except I have recently purchased the 10" big brother to your 8" quattro so I can probably help you out. 

@KevS and @mikey2000 are right about collimation but once collimated my f4 scope seems to hold collimation fairly well so don't be put off. If you haven't got a cheshire eyepiece I would get one ASAP to make the job a lot easier.  At the very least you should definitely get an ordinary eyepiece in there and check how things look to your eye before attaching the camera but as a long time observational astronomer I'd guess you've probably already done that and that things aren't too bad in that regard. In that case I would resist the urge to fiddle with collimation for now, it is not a complicated procedure but getting it right is a skill and you need to develop an eye for it.

Kstars/Ekos/Indi on the rpi4 will serve you well although as with any software there is a learning curve so persevere! The pi4 is powerful enough to control everything including hosting an astrometry server for fast plate solving which is invaluable but we can worry about that later. To start with  let's get you focused!  

I'm assuming that you've already been able to use ekos to perform a capture with the zwo and this was how you found out you couldn't get focus. If so then I would simply get an eyepiece in the scope, get venus nicely centred and start tracking with the handset. Swap out the eyepiece for the zwo, load up kstars etc and get a live video feed from the camera then turn the focuser back and forward slowly throughout its full travel and you should be able to find focus. Apologies if that sounds patronising,  just pitching it at a nice high level to start with.

There are various ways to get a video feed in ekos, I tend to use the loop function in the guide module (the one with the compass icon) but there is a live view option in the "CCD" capture module too (camera icon). You may need to play with  exposure settings or frame rates in ekos but with something as bright as venus you shouldn't have to fiddle too much to get an image you can work with for focusing. After that you can slew to a nice bright star, fine tune focus and lock the focuser. When you're done make a note of where the focuser tube is in its travel, some people use a marker on the focus tube for future reference.

I've made a fair few assumptions there so if you have any questions or need me to steer you more on the specifics let me know. I'll not get into workflow details as the other guys have given a good overview but happy to help out with tips for your setup if you have more specific questions.

Good luck and clear skies!

Mark

Ps When you eventually switch the zwo to the guide scope there will be more fiddling to do but that's part of the fun!

Edited by mercandrea

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Mercandria, KevS, and Mikey2000:  

Oh my gosh!  Thank you so much for the exceptionally warm welcome! I am absolutely floored by the thoughtful and kind responses to my note from everyone. I just want to say thank you from the bottom of my heart to offer help.  Also, my students (9-12th graders) from Bush School thank you for helping me to help them.  Just brilliant!  Where can I possibly see some of the pictures you have taken - Are you posting somewhere like Astrobin etc?

I hope all of you are keeping healthy and safe during these extraordinary times we are in due to the coronavirus epidemc. Astronomy and sky watching especially is a godsend as it is mostly a solitary hobby - at least for now.

Let me comment about what I "think" I know and have handled already with the setup. I will "grade" my own comfort level of these topics below on a 4.0 grading scale. If you see that I have erred - please call me out! My students call me out on a regular basis - I am used to it!

A. CL:2.0 - I see that this is a common theme in all of your feedback so far. I have now attempted to collimate the Quattro now 3 times.  I noticed that the secondary mirror was off alignment with the primary when I got the scope.  I used the Hotek laser to figure this out.  It seems to happen when I move the OTA back and forth on the rings to try and achieve balance.  I am hopeless at balancing. See point #C below. I then have tried to star collimate. Honestly, this is a a little dubious.  The instructions say that we have to see concentric diffration circles when focusing in and out. I have noticed that moving my eye back and forth on the eyepiece I can get the circles to be concentric! Also the FOV is very small with my 16 mm Televue Nagler Type 6 eye piece. I have a 25 mm plossl as well which is not much better for this scope?  I think the collimation is fine.  

B. CL:3.0 - I have polar aligned the scope many times using the built-in polar scope and it seems to be OK. There seems to be no alignment issue of the polar scope with respect to the mount - so that is a plus. The internal reticle is off a bit from vertical - 12:00 clock seems to be at the 1:08 AM position - a minor irrtitation. I just read the clock face in my head.  When the scope is loaded with weights and the Telescope it is really hard to engage the lever to move the scope higher in altitude. Any tips here can be helpful. If I keep the scope at the same place each day - this part is a cinch with only monor adjustments needed.  I am using PS Align Pro and my HC to set clock time for Polaris in the outer circle. 

C CL:2.5 - I then lock all my Alt-Azimuth bolts and my RA/DEC cluthches as tightly as I can.  I have noticed slippage here and at one time my scope had slipped all thw way down - luckily nothing was damaged. Any tips here?  I do what I can with scope balancing, but it seems quite hard to get correctly especially that I have now started add and subtract devices like eye pieces and DSLR's etc.  BTB.  I am attempting to use my finder scope of the Quattro as a guide scope with my ASI224MC attached to it - no luck with focusing here. I have not attempted to guide at all yet. I noticed that Mikey2000 had this specific point in the signature - I am eager to get any feedback.  I have attached a picture of how I did it.

D. CL:3.5 - I usually do a 1-star Align with my HC first using Arcturus which comes up over the horzon at my lattitude just as I am setting up.  This is a backup as I can revert back to optical viewing using the HC if my RPI setup misbehaves.  I have been able to verify that the pointing accuracy is quite good and better than my NexStar 5. Aligning through Ekos module is another matter - see below.

E. CL:3.8 - Setting up the PI4 - netowrking, wireless, modules installation, communication to the scope using the direct USB on mount, VNC, Camera with USB3 and the like. I built a custom PI for this purpose with Astroberry software including KStars, Indi, Ekos, OaCapture.  Also communicating with KStars on a remore laptop and iPad as well. I intend to run Plate Solving (haven't really attempted this yet) and Phd2 guiding from the remote system - is this correct? Any feedback here will be helpful. 

F. CL:2.0 - Focusing on the camera. This is an impossible task! I would like to get a view of what I am looking at to achieve focus. I will definitely use a Bahtinov mask as KevS had suggested viusually. But how do you do it on the Camera?  I figured out how to get a live view - maybe that's the key to it?

G. CL:1.0 - Guiding - Not attempted this one yet. I think I need to confidently get my ZWO ASI 224MC installed on the 9x50 Finder Scope as a guide scope to work first. I have attached a picture of how I attached the camera to the Finder scope.

 

Here are some specific items:

Mikey - I have attached a picture I took of Mizar and Alcor with a DSLR I attached with the coma corrector to the focuser. I really could use your collective wisdom with this one!  I have attached a picture of Mizar/Alcor taken with my DSLR.  I focused the best I could.  I do not know if this says anything about collimation. But the diffraction spikes on Mizar was cool and I was able to get some 12th mag stars on this 1-sec exposure.   Thank you for workflow.  That is very instructive indeed, also ominous!

KevS - Thank you for all of the links!  That was fantastic.  Long nights of reading when the clouds are out - which is most of the time in Seattle!

Mercandria - I am very happy to note that you have not one but 2 Quattros - Wow.  There is a lot I could learn from you.  Right now Balancing seems to be a big issue mechanically speaking.  Do you have any tricks for that.  I tried your ides on focusing except not outside.  I fooled the mount into thinking that my wife' sewing machine was a target.  I attached the ZWO to the finder scope and got it show me a live view with the exposure set to a low 0.015 seconds.  I took a picture of fine threads (no quite pinpoint but a really small target) and was able to move the focus from one thread to the other by fine adjustment.   I have attached it here. Thank you so much for the offer of help.  I appreciate it very much!

I wanted to finish this note with my goals for observing. My personal goal is to learn enough and teach Observing, Astrophotography of the Moon, Planets Galaxies and Nebulae, Spectral Analysis of Stars to students, to develop an appreciation for our ephemeral existence in the Universe and to protect our Planet so that they and future genertions can look out and wonder. I hope to establish a regular observing program at my School. 

We are extremely lucky to be inhabiting the Solar System at our specific location in our Milky Way. I wonder about civilizations that might exist inside a Globular Cluster for example - Will they ever get to see the sky like we do, will they learn about the atomic structure of matter, know that the calcium in their bones and iron in their blood came from a Supernove, discover other galaxies or the glow from the big bang? 

 

Thank you all very much!

- dru

 

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Posted (edited)

I think before trying to learn how to do photography, if it were me, I would first try learning how to align the scope and mount with a 3 star alignment, with a 32mm Plossl visually, make sure you understand how to do that and can do that repeatably and reliably, then learn how to collimate the scope, at 50x, then 100, then 200x in focus then at 400x in focus, then learn how to polar align the mount, and then think about attempting to get a camera to focus through the scope without an eyepiece. In that order. Just my 2p worth.

Regards,
AG

Edited by Live_Steam_Mad

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Dru - about the 9x50.  It was hard to focus!  I got this done during daytime, pointing at a distant horizon object and using camera live view software.  Coarse focus obtained by sliding the camera in and out of the adapter then fine focus by fiddling with the nurled ring on the objective end of the 9x50.   Both 'rings' at that end can be loosened then adjusted. I forget exactly how as once it was done, I tightened it and don't dare touch it again!  Good focus is all you need for guiding, not exact focus.  Depending on your camera etc, maybe you will need a spacer.   Search elsewhere in this forum - there are many experts here who don't have Eq6R mounts 🙂

 

The DSLR star pic shows 'ok' focus but not exact.  The smaller stars look misfocussed/donutty.  Definitely get a bhatinov mask and use live view.

Here's my 9x50 setup .  Just for fun, I also show the cardboard baffle I made.  It stops dew building up on the objective.  I also had to make a carboard baffle to help avoid dew buildup on my 200pds secondary mirror (and the cardboard helps avoid annoying reflections from domestic lighting...  I ended up buying a secondary mirror dew heater to avoid fogging on the secondary on those more humid nights...)

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Hi all, excellent thread ... Just wondering if the EQ6R will handle a C8 EDGE / ASI 1600mm / filter wheel etc, £1200 is a lot of money if it still can't guide my gear ? imaging scale is 0.56 so a big ask 🙂

 

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How heavy is that scope?   Skywatcher report an official payload of 20KG for astrophotography.   I use the same camera/wheel as you on a 200PDS.  My scope weighs 8KG on it's own, not including camera, guidescope and guide cam.  I routinely get guide RMS of 0.7".  Sometimes worse, sometimes better.  I believe I am usually "seeing limited"  I think my record was a sustained 0.45" 🙂     I image at 0.74" pixel size and usually get results that keep me happy.    For me, I'm convinced the atmosphere is the limit, not the mount.  Also, my big scope acts as a lovely sail on slightly breezy night - you can see exactly when the wind gusted ...

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2 hours ago, knobby said:

Hi all, excellent thread ... Just wondering if the EQ6R will handle a C8 EDGE / ASI 1600mm / filter wheel etc, £1200 is a lot of money if it still can't guide my gear ? imaging scale is 0.56 so a big ask 🙂

 

Last night I was imaging with a 150PL (which is similar weight to the C8 because of the long tube), ASI1600, filter wheel plus a DSLR on a ball mount with a double battery pack on the counterweight bar. Focal length is 'only' 1200mm  but my imaging scale is 0.64" so I think yours might be a bit smaller than 0.56"?

Anyroad up... that's on an HEQ5 and my guiding tops out at 0.59" when the seeing is good and the wind isn't gusty, but to be honest I get tight, round stars and lots of detail. The EQ6 achieves similar accuracy, but it can take a greater payload so my thought is either HEQ5 or EQ6R will handle the C8. The EQ6 has teh potential to take much bigger scopes but will be better in a wind as well I suspect.

I think you would have to go to an EQ8 or similar to do better.

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