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JohnSadlerAstro

EOS 1000d Astro-Modification Report

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Hi,

*First of all, a massive shout-out to @LightBucket and @Gerry Casa Christiana for their extreme patience and support with this project; I would have messed up BIG time without them!

I've been increasingly aware of the limitations imposed by my 1000d's IR Cut filter, so I decided that I would modify it myself; (at no cost other than my nerves) a project which also provided a cloudy-week boost to astrophotography. I decided to use Garry Honis' instructions for the operation. (http://dslrmodifications.com/rebelmod450d1.html) The instructions are very detailed and progress well step-by-step, I would definitely recommend them to anyone who wants to do a similar mod.

I decided that I would remove the main IR cutting filter, but leave the less harsh IR filter (LPF#1) so I wouldn't need to buy any separate IR filters, etc. 

The modification process is reasonably simple in most places, but there are some more difficult points which everyone considering the mod should be aware of.

1. Ribbon Cables--especially the "hinge" type. All the 1000d cables except the one referenced as J in Garry's instructions, are easy to remove so long as you are careful. However, in my camera, the connector for cable J was slightly different to the rest, its clamp is thinner and extends further from the actual connecting pins. Essentially, it is too weak to raise if the cable is pushed in too far. I learned this very quickly when part of the plastic broke, at which point I realized that the camera would die if I tried any more.
I would strongly advise anyone completing the mod to leave cable J in place, and also the large plug connection on the right hand (shutter button) side of the camera. It is still possible (though a bit more fiddly) to remove the CMOS assembly with the main circuit board still attached, but pulled out of the way.

2. The IR Cut Filter glass is very thin. It will break. I learned the hard way when a tiny shard went into my eye which didn't come out for a few hours. Fortunately, the glass went right into the corner of my eye, or it could have been quite serious.
Wear safety glasses when dismantling and reassembling the filters.

3. The final screw put into the CMOS assembly when putting it into the camera again, (the far left hand side screw, a small size one I believe) is very difficult to put in. I lost one to the bowels of the camera while attempting to put the screw back in.
If in doubt, leave it out when it comes to impossible and unnecessary screws.

Apart for these points, everything went very well with the modification progress. (Though I was surprised when the cam turned on!) The 1000d's white balance doesn't have enough White Balance adjustability to counter the strong red bias which a modded cam gives all the images, but it's unlikely anyone uses a 2008 vintage 1000d for daytime holiday snaps, so no trouble there.

 

The very unsightly red bias was obvious immediately; I didn't have any time to take before and after images, but the results were so clear, I feel they aren't needed. I guess the really exciting moment will be the first deep-sky image!

IMG_2517.thumb.JPG.9958289832a38cf763af62eaac680bd2.JPG

 

So in summary, if you are wondering about modding a 1000d or similar, watch Garry Honis' YouTube video showing a modification. It will show you immediately if the process is something you'll be happy completing or a hopeless nightmare. If you decide to mod your cam yourself, read through the instructions fully a couple of times to familiarize yourself with the process. Be warned, it took me 5.5 hours including setup, plus several hours research! Then approach it as relaxed as you can, and follow the instructions carefully and slowly, double-checking everything. 

The best approach is that of the SAS motto:
Who dares, wins!

John

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Good job. I think Lord Baden Powell’s motto of ‘Be Prepared’ is apt here. 

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Good report! Just one thing you missed - whilst cutting out the filter, don't slice into your thumb! (Of course I did...)

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I didn't mention that no screwdriver we owned fitted, so i filed one down to fit! :D 

I'd probably be burned, Monty Python style, at the stake by Canon Ltd for abusing one of their high-quality products like I did! ;) 

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2 hours ago, JohnSadlerAstro said:

warned, it took me 5.5 hours including setup, plus several hours research!

Thank you John as i plan to do the same to my D450 in the couple of days. You have brought this process down for me to 3.5hrs?? with your great write up.

Looking forward to some images from you.

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No problem, it's been great learning and modding, and it's good that my "modding experience" has helped someone else! :) 

Edited by JohnSadlerAstro

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Been a great read John, good to see you still have your eyesight and thumbs. you will notice a difference - look forward to seeing the difference - looking for Ha filters is the next step, 2" will do I believe :happy6::happy6:  (too much pink in that room John, carpet, couch and who has pink doors.........)

@icebergahed take it slowly and carefully, we worked via Gary's instructions and video and kept notes.

Edited by Mick J
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22 hours ago, JohnSadlerAstro said:

No problem, it's been great learning and modding, and it's good that my "modding experience" has helped someone else! :) 

 

On 27/01/2018 at 20:14, JohnSadlerAstro said:

*First of all, a massive shout-out to @LightBucket and @Gerry Casa Christiana for their extreme patience and support with this project; I would have messed up BIG time without them!

Well done John!

Yes the red is perfectly natural :) the white balance can be adjusted but only back to normal yes you guessed right if you spend more money! but I only use mine for astrophotography. Yes it is a great thing to do yourself but I do have to say a steady hand is very helpful and courage! Please do publish your first picture. Do something with plenty of H Alpha where you will see a big difference. 

Gerry 

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10 hours ago, Gerry Casa Christiana said:

Do something with plenty of H Alpha where you will see a big difference. 

Based on current "clear sky rates" that probably won't be due for a couple of weeks, but I am thinking of trying the Rosette Nebula if we get a clear night soon. I already have an image from just before Christmas, so there will be a good comparison. Unfortunately, Orion is beginning to get a bit low by the time our streetlights are turned off.

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Though,, looking at the weather for tonight, I might be able to do some "lower grade" imaging earlier on in the night, humidity getting towards 100% absolute later! :D 

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