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alecras2345
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Hi im Ash, im 39 from North Wales.   I'm interested in Astronomy, I'm more interested in knowing the facts than actually going out observing.   I've been interested in Astronomy for a few years but getting nowhere with learning the facts.

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Welcome to the forum Ash! You've come to the right place if you want to learn more, there are many experienced members here (not including me!). Combining observation with learning facts would be the best way to go in my opinion, as observation can lead to many questions, which can then lead to more fact-checking. :)

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 I am typing facts for myself to learn about the sun, moon and things that are in our solar system. I'm using the Nasa website as it's probably the most reliable source, what do you think? I type into the search box Sun and it comes up with information about the sun. Here is what i've typed so far. I want to type facts on our moon next

Sun – Hot ball of glowing gases
Main gases – Hydrogen, Helium
Sun shines – Nuclear Fusion 
Surface - Photosphere
Outer atmosphere– Corona
Core temp – 15 million degrees celsius 
Surface temp – 6,000 celsius 
Sun/Earth – 92.96 million miles
Sunspots- Magnetic field lines breaking through the surface
Solar eclipse - Moon between Earth
and Sun

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3 minutes ago, alecras2345 said:

 I am typing facts for myself to learn about the sun, moon and things that are in our solar system. I'm using the Nasa website as it's probably the most reliable source, what do you think? I type into the search box Sun and it comes up with information about the sun. Here is what i've typed so far. I want to type facts on our moon next

Sun – Hot ball of glowing gases
Main gases – Hydrogen, Helium
Sun shines – Nuclear Fusion 
Surface - Photosphere
Outer atmosphere– Corona
Core temp – 15 million degrees celsius 
Surface temp – 6,000 celsius 
Sun/Earth – 92.96 million miles
Sunspots- Magnetic field lines breaking through the surface
Solar eclipse - Moon between Earth
and Sun

Hi welcome to SGL!

Hope you don't mind but I would like to make a correction! The Sun is not made of gas (idk why NASA says gas) but rather plasma. An entire different state of matter that occurs when you heat up gas to such a temperature that it's electrons break away from the nucleus.

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16 minutes ago, alecras2345 said:

 I am typing facts for myself to learn about the sun, moon and things that are in our solar system. I'm using the Nasa website as it's probably the most reliable source, what do you think? I type into the search box Sun and it comes up with information about the sun. Here is what i've typed so far. I want to type facts on our moon next

Sun – Hot ball of glowing gases
Main gases – Hydrogen, Helium
Sun shines – Nuclear Fusion 
Surface - Photosphere
Outer atmosphere– Corona
Core temp – 15 million degrees celsius 
Surface temp – 6,000 celsius 
Sun/Earth – 92.96 million miles
Sunspots- Magnetic field lines breaking through the surface
Solar eclipse - Moon between Earth
and Sun

You asked the same question in this thread

 

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Hi, Ash. Welcome to the forum.

Yes, I think it’s more than OK to use NASA as a source for ‘facts’.

Galen’s point above is valid but perhaps a little harsh. To my mind, the words ‘glowing gases’ could be forgiven/accepted as describing plasma - which is ionised gas, as Galen writes.

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4 hours ago, Galen Gilmore said:

Hope you don't mind but I would like to make a correction! The Sun is not made of gas (idk why NASA says gas) but rather plasma. An entire different state of matter that occurs when you heat up gas to such a temperature that it's electrons break away from the nucleus.

Ah yes... as unforgettably noted here:

 

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2 hours ago, Floater said:

Hi, Ash. Welcome to the forum.

Yes, I think it’s more than OK to use NASA as a source for ‘facts’.

Galen’s point above is valid but perhaps a little harsh. To my mind, the words ‘glowing gases’ could be forgiven/accepted as describing plasma - which is ionised gas, as Galen writes.

Apologies for appearing to be harsh, not my intention.

In my opinion gasses and Plasma shouldn't be interchanged due to the fact they have completely different properties. It would be like comparing Liquid water and water vapor, they have the same H2O compound but have different properties. 

Not attempting to start an argument, just stating my opinion. You are of course free to use whatever wording you would like.

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Opinions are free to be expressed, there are no restrictions.
Unfortunately some who differ in opinion from others, go off on an argumentative rant, 
but as long as that doesn't happen, everything is good. 
At best, it is best to agree to disagree :).

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I have started facts on the moon from https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/moons/e...moon/overview/ . Do these sound ok, do i need to add important facts?

Earth/Moon distance approx– 238,855 miles
Moving about an inch further away from earth each year
Synchronous rotation – Same side always faces Earth
Orbit – 27 days
No atmosphere
Lunar eclipse – moon passes into Earths shadow during full moon
Diameter – 2,158 miles
 

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